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View Full Version : Wampler Faux Spring Reverb - Anything Better?


hardys
05-23-2013, 09:01 AM
I've been listening to a lot of spring reverb pedal video demos on the web, and so far, the Wampler sounds the closest I've heard to a real spring reverb tank.

Is there any other pedal out there that does the spring thing as good or better than the Faux Spring?

HowardMusic
05-24-2013, 09:41 AM
How about the Subdecay Spring Theory ?

youandme
05-24-2013, 09:50 AM
No.

FenderBigot
05-24-2013, 09:52 AM
Hard to beat that Wampler. I had one that I used in front of a Mesa TA15, sounded very real to me... And I am a bit of a Fender spring 'verb snob.

dukeh62
05-24-2013, 09:56 AM
I own a real '64 fender tank, and the Wampler is the closest I've found. Tried the Subdecay (and many others) and found it REALLY bright.

jazzfromhell
05-24-2013, 11:49 AM
The Hardwire RV7 actually has a very good Spring reverb in it. I havent compared it to the Wampler but for spring sounds its my absolute favorite.

youandme
05-24-2013, 11:52 AM
No.

kwaping
05-24-2013, 12:04 PM
Did you try the Solid Gold FX Surf Rider?

LqdSndDist
05-24-2013, 12:39 PM
Boss FVR-1 if you want a drippier sound. The Wampler is great for sounding like the built in reverb in a combo amp.

Really just depends if when you say "Fender reverb" if your talking something like a big external spring tank, or a smaller combo tank. Big difference between the 63 tank and a Deluxe for example

LqdSndDist
05-24-2013, 12:41 PM
Did you try the Solid Gold FX Surf Rider?

Its my goal to make people stop thinking the Surf Rider is a spring reverb, its not. I bought it thinking it was, and was very disappointed.

They actually don't even say it has a spring sound specifically in the marketing, but the name makes people think it does. Thats why I bought one and I assumed with a name like Surf Rider it had to be a spring type reverb. Right ? Wrong.

It is a Belton brick based reverb, not a spring emulation. Its got the typical Belton pre-delay and it can get kind of a cool retro reverb sound, which does sound great, but is has ZERO DRIP

Simple test; Crank up the reverb and just slap the strings, what do you hear ? A slapback delay sound.

It does not do the percussive "drip" effect of a real tank because the Belton Brick can't do that.

Snufkinoob
05-24-2013, 02:49 PM
No.
No.

Have you compared the Wampler to other spring reverb pedals? How have you come to this decision? Twice no less.


The Hardwire RV7 actually has a very good Spring reverb in it. I havent compared it to the Wampler but for spring sounds its my absolute favorite.

Yes. Surprisingly good for a mass produced pedal. I've been through about 20 reverb pedals and have settled on the RV-7 for Spring.

Its my goal to make people stop thinking the Surf Rider is a spring reverb, its not. I bought it thinking it was, and was very disappointed.

They actually don't even say it has a spring sound specifically in the marketing, but the name makes people think it does. Thats why I bought one and I assumed with a name like Surf Rider it had to be a spring type reverb. Right ? Wrong.

It is a Belton brick based reverb, not a spring emulation. Its got the typical Belton pre-delay and it can get kind of a cool retro reverb sound, which does sound great, but is has ZERO DRIP

Simple test; Crank up the reverb and just slap the strings, what do you hear ? A slapback delay sound.

It does not do the percussive "drip" effect of a real tank because the Belton Brick can't do that.

Yes, you're right. They don't model spring reverb like digitech/Boss/Subdecay etc, etc. The whole belton brick = spring reverb is just marketing talk, however they are still pretty good.

FWIW The Mr. Springgy smooths out that delay-like decay, so is pretty good, but for me the Super Surf gets nice and loud, and the option to put on the second layer is quite unique, and you can get fairly 'neutral' reverb sounds with it so have been my favourite. Not sure how the Wampler compares, but all belton reverbs sound fundamentally the same. Mr. Springgy has a smoothed out, long decay, SS has an extra layer and a volume boost, EQD Ghost Echo you can adjust the pre-delay slightly. Not sure what the Wampler offers as being a little different.

For what it's worth I wrote this comparison between the RV-7 and SG Surf: http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showthread.php?t=1211308

I still have both and wouldn't part with either.

hardys
05-24-2013, 03:27 PM
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the Wampler uses a Belton Brick, right?

papersun
05-24-2013, 03:34 PM
No.
No.
:munch

Texas Jake
05-24-2013, 03:52 PM
Haven't tried the Wampler but I do have a Subdecay. It nails the sound of my Fender '63 reverb unit to a "T". In a live setting, it would be nearly impossible to tell the two apart. I have some other Wampler pedals and they do what they do really well. I doubt you could go wrong with either one. And either one would be easier to haul and more reliable than a true spring reverb tank. After re-tubing, replacing the tank, and other repairs, it decided to retire mine and go with a pedal.

The Subdecay is awesome but I ultimately ended up with a Flint. The spring reverb is maybe a notch below the Subdecay but the harmonic trem is amazing. Again, I doubt you'd be able to tell the difference in a live setting.

kracdown
05-24-2013, 06:14 PM
My favorite is the Flint. Haven't played through one that sounds more real.

hollowhero
05-24-2013, 06:41 PM
I'd recommend the hardwire rv-7 or supernatural for their spring or plate sounds. Pick up the supernatural if you want a really long spring sound, rv-7 otherwise

Boss FVR-1 if you want a drippier sound. The Wampler is great for sounding like the built in reverb in a combo amp.

Really just depends if when you say "Fender reverb" if your talking something like a big external spring tank, or a smaller combo tank. Big difference between the 63 tank and a Deluxe for example

I've heard many times that the fvr-1 doesn't take dirt well...just something to keep in mind

youandme
05-24-2013, 06:52 PM
well,i just noticed that i posted my answer twice... :) pardon...
and yes,i did compare the wampler to other reverbs...
the strymon flint and bluesky were sterile in comparison and sounded too digital to me...the subdecay sounded good and came in second but it didn't handle dirt as well as the wampler and was bit too harsh for my hears(the wampler has a tone control for the reverb signal)....the hardwire was too digital sounding as well... i use the wampler as an almost always on pedal and i'm not looking for the big tank reverb but the small combo deluxe reverb type,and for that the wampler sounds the best to me... just my opinion...or as i said it twice before...no.

amphead777
05-24-2013, 07:01 PM
I think Wampler hit this one on the head.

ruger9
05-25-2013, 06:32 AM
The Wampler is the best I've heard, with 2nd place going to the Malekko Spring... I'm going to buy one soon, and may just get the spring due to it's smaller size and lower price tag... I don't know if I'll need the tone control (of the Wampler) or not... I guess it'll depend on the amp and guitar...

hardys
05-25-2013, 06:43 AM
well,i just noticed that i posted my answer twice... :) pardon...
and yes,i did compare the wampler to other reverbs...
the strymon flint and bluesky were sterile in comparison and sounded too digital to me...the subdecay sounded good and came in second but it didn't handle dirt as well as the wampler and was bit too harsh for my hears(the wampler has a tone control for the reverb signal)....the hardwire was too digital sounding as well... i use the wampler as an almost always on pedal and i'm not looking for the big tank reverb but the small combo deluxe reverb type,and for that the wampler sounds the best to me... just my opinion...or as i said it twice before...no.

Although I can only comment on videos that I've seen, the Wampler has a more natural, organic sound to it that the frv1 & hardwire fall short on. Those 2 have a bit of digital sound & lack the richness/fullness & warmth of the Wampler. The only video that I've seen so far that comes close is the Surf Rider, but the Wampler sounds a little better. I don't like basing my purchase solely on videos, though for obvious reasons. That's why I value the opinions of others who have actually used them.

So, hardwire & boss owners...please set me straight if my impressions of those 2 pedals are wrong.

hardys
05-25-2013, 06:52 AM
The Wampler is the best I've heard, with 2nd place going to the Malekko Spring... I'm going to buy one soon, and may just get the spring due to it's smaller size and lower price tag... I don't know if I'll need the tone control (of the Wampler) or not... I guess it'll depend on the amp and guitar...

Which Malekko model are you referring to?

ruger9
05-25-2013, 07:14 AM
Which Malekko model are you referring to?

The newest one, the SPRING.

jazzfromhell
05-25-2013, 07:22 AM
Although I can only comment on videos that I've seen, the Wampler has a more natural, organic sound to it that the frv1 & hardwire fall short on. Those 2 have a bit of digital sound & lack the richness/fullness & warmth of the Wampler. The only video that I've seen so far that comes close is the Surf Rider, but the Wampler sounds a little better. I don't like basing my purchase solely on videos, though for obvious reasons. That's why I value the opinions of others who have actually used them.

So, hardwire & boss owners...please set me straight if my impressions of those 2 pedals are wrong.
I don't think the RV7 sounds digital at all. Now I'm no spring reverb expert but it sounds plenty good to me, especially in a band mix. It just happens to be digital and it has several other great-sounding reverbs in it as well, the Plate for instance. Now, it might not be the exact sound YOU are after but try it before you decide.
They're ridiculously cheap used these days, as is the entire Hardwire line. I'd say they are some of the most underrated pedals out there. The reverb, delay and Valve Distortion are as good as any other pedals out there sound- and quality wise. It's just a matter of personal preference.

halfmanhalfgear
05-25-2013, 07:44 AM
I had the RV7 and the Wampler for a while and having compared them both have sold the RV7.

Although the RV7 is very good, compared to the Wampler it sounds very false and often much too dark. The tone control on the Wampler is very important in my opinion. The RV7 also had a too short a maximum reverb time -I found.

Saying that, when I compared them both I found the Wampler could only do a very slightly a longer reverb time, but the overall effect just sounds so much better and more natural.

I'm very satisfied with the Faux Spring Reverb.

MakJ61
05-25-2013, 09:13 AM
Another vote for the Wampler FSR. I own one and am very satisfied with it in front of my tweed 5E3 Deluxe.

This very good demo will show you what it can do– It sold me when I was looking for a pedal that could nail a Spring sound.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8glyZg2SIUw

mlj_gear
05-25-2013, 11:12 AM
Its my goal to make people stop thinking the Surf Rider is a spring reverb, its not. I bought it thinking it was, and was very disappointed.

They actually don't even say it has a spring sound specifically in the marketing, but the name makes people think it does. Thats why I bought one and I assumed with a name like Surf Rider it had to be a spring type reverb. Right ? Wrong.

It is a Belton brick based reverb, not a spring emulation. Its got the typical Belton pre-delay and it can get kind of a cool retro reverb sound, which does sound great, but is has ZERO DRIP

Simple test; Crank up the reverb and just slap the strings, what do you hear ? A slapback delay sound.

It does not do the percussive "drip" effect of a real tank because the Belton Brick can't do that.

Frankly, I think the Surf Rider sounds an awful lot like a very good spring reverb. I've owned it, and I own the Wampler. I also the Guyatone tank reverb with a 6K6 installed.

To my ears, the surf rider sounds ever-so-slightly better than the Wampler on most settings EXCEPT for the fact that it's much noisier. It sounds a decent bit better than the Wampler at really high reverb settings, but then it's REALLY noisy.

mlj_gear
05-25-2013, 11:14 AM
Also, the Hardwire RV-7 does sound digital to my ears. I haven't tried the Supernatural.

Oz Hofstatter
05-25-2013, 11:15 AM
Wampler Reverb is my favorite!!!
Cheers,
Oz

Snufkinoob
05-25-2013, 01:16 PM
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the Wampler uses a Belton Brick, right?

I think so, yes.

I'd recommend the hardwire rv-7 or supernatural for their spring or plate sounds. Pick up the supernatural if you want a really long spring sound, rv-7 otherwise


I've heard many times that the fvr-1 doesn't take dirt well...just something to keep in mind

I found the FRV-1 didn't like dirt. The RV-7 is fine.

well,i just noticed that i posted my answer twice... :) pardon...
and yes,i did compare the wampler to other reverbs...
the strymon flint and bluesky were sterile in comparison and sounded too digital to me...the subdecay sounded good and came in second but it didn't handle dirt as well as the wampler and was bit too harsh for my hears(the wampler has a tone control for the reverb signal)....the hardwire was too digital sounding as well... i use the wampler as an almost always on pedal and i'm not looking for the big tank reverb but the small combo deluxe reverb type,and for that the wampler sounds the best to me... just my opinion...or as i said it twice before...no.

;)

I think the Wampler or Mr. Springgy would be the "always on" kind of reverb rather than perhaps full-on surf style reverb.. or can the Wampler get quite loud?


Frankly, I think the Surf Rider sounds an awful lot like a very good spring reverb. I've owned it, and I own the Wampler. I also the Guyatone tank reverb with a 6K6 installed.

To my ears, the surf rider sounds ever-so-slightly better than the Wampler on most settings EXCEPT for the fact that it's much noisier. It sounds a decent bit better than the Wampler at really high reverb settings, but then it's REALLY noisy.


I was just going to ask how the Wampler compares the Surf since they're both (I think) belton bricks. I might keep an eye out on ebay for the Wampler, but the noise of the Surf hasn't bothered me yet, and I quite like the more extreme, layered/louder settings sometimes.


For everyone saying the Hardwire sounds 'digital' I know what you mean, but I put it down to sounding more 'familiar', like it's a from a recording if that makes sense. I can get why some people might not like it, but I find the natural, ambient tone really nice, and smoother than the Boss FRV-1, and the spring 'splash' just as authentic as the Boss, so I prefer it more. It's worth a shot though, especially as they go for dirt cheap used since they're not a boutique pedal.

Also, for what it's worth some guys on the surfguitar101 forum all say the opposite about the Wampler! I was asking about it on there, and most of the replies said it sounded quite bad, so there's that to consider I guess

ruger9
05-25-2013, 05:00 PM
Also, for what it's worth some guys on the surfguitar101 forum all say the opposite about the Wampler! I was asking about it on there, and most of the replies said it sounded quite bad, so there's that to consider I guess

yeah but a tone of those guys think the FRV-1 is king... I thought it was terrible, digital artifacts all over the place. And too bright.

LqdSndDist
05-25-2013, 05:30 PM
Frankly, I think the Surf Rider sounds an awful lot like a very good spring reverb. I've owned it, and I own the Wampler. I also the Guyatone tank reverb with a 6K6 installed.

To my ears, the surf rider sounds ever-so-slightly better than the Wampler on most settings EXCEPT for the fact that it's much noisier. It sounds a decent bit better than the Wampler at really high reverb settings, but then it's REALLY noisy.


It, like most any Belton based pedal, can get a cool retro like reverb sound, which at milder settings isn't too unlike a spring reverb set low (even the Wet reverb can do a decent combo amp spring set to about 1-2 on the dial)

But just crank up the reverb and what happens ? It turns into a slapback delay/echo.

As I said, simple test; lightly mute the strings with your fretting hand and then give the strings a slap with your picking hand. There is no percussive splash like a real spring reverb tank.

May not be an issue for some, but its a total deal breaker for me because I like to use the drippy splash as a rhythmic rest during the song.

I finger pick and kind of tuck my fingers in and hit the strings with my nail bed during the rest and with a good spring tank/emulation, you get that effect.

Surf Rider, just like the Ghost Echo etc doesn't do that. It did sound awesome for some rockabilly style stuff with a cool echo chamber vibe, but it doesn't really do surf right, nor any cleaner retro atmospheric stuff, kind like something you'd hear from Chris Issak for example.

Does your give you a drip ?

Did I have a defective pedal ? I've only tried one, which I bought and returned.

Did they stop using the Belton Brick and switch to some true emulation ?

LqdSndDist
05-25-2013, 05:35 PM
yeah but a tone of those guys think the FRV-1 is king... I thought it was terrible, digital artifacts all over the place. And too bright.


Does have a tone knob on it you know...

Funny though as I always liked to turn the tone knob up because I wanted a brighter reverb. I usually played it with a kind of dark sounding semi hollow body though.

I think a lot of people honestly would find a real external tank (especially in front of an amp) to sound pretty terrible. Its not a very versatile sound in the least.

I mean really, how many guitarist really love the sound of surf guitar and chase that tone ? Its a very niche thing that only appeals to a minority.

Unless you want to play in a very specific style an external tank is going to sound pretty terrible.

rh
05-25-2013, 06:05 PM
Another vote for the Wampler FSR. I own one and am very satisfied with it in front of my tweed 5E3 Deluxe.

This very good demo will show you what it can doľ It sold me when I was looking for a pedal that could nail a Spring sound.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8glyZg2SIUw

It does sound good -- but not noticeably better than a Flint. And for just $70 more for the Flint I get add tube / plate reverb and three types of trem.

If the Wampler was $179 or even $199 it'd be a better deal compared to the Flint.

dukeh62
05-25-2013, 07:00 PM
Unless you want to play in a very specific style an external tank is going to sound pretty terrible.

Disagree.

ruger9
05-25-2013, 07:25 PM
Does have a tone knob on it you know...

.

yes, and it was still too bright.

LqdSndDist
05-25-2013, 07:37 PM
Disagree.


Okay then, while your entitled to your opinion of course, perhaps you could try to help support it in terms of "most people"

How many guys do you really see plugging a big external tank into the front of their amps ?

Was at the big Rock on the Range concert, which had probably 60+ bands, and didn't see anyone of the rock to metal range of styles using a big spring tank.

I used to work for a number of music publications such as Kerrang! in the UK in addition to a few others, plus my job as editor of a local arts/entertainment paper for 7 years, I was going to at least 2-3 shows a week for work, in addition to performances I've attended as a fan.

Out of literally several hundred shows of all styles, I can count on one hand the number of times I've seen people use something like a 63 tank.

They just don't sound good with any sort of dirt.

Yet here you are disagreeing, which means you believe that most people like the sound of the big tank up front.

Now again, if you do, great, but if its so popular with "Most people" how come hardly anyone uses one ?

Shouldn't an effect popular with "most people" be as common place in both popular recordings and on gear threads as, say, a tube screamer variation ?

Just doesn't make sense to me why "most people" love the sound of a big tank, yet outside of surf and some rockabilly, you don't hear dripping reverb.

Don't hear it in pop songs, don't hear it in country songs, don't hear it in rock songs.

Are there times its used ? Of course, but to argue that mainstream music, and most musicians all want big dripping reverb just seem silly.

Texas Jake
05-25-2013, 11:20 PM
Well I'd venture to guess most guys don't use external tanks because digital pedals are way cheaper and more versatile. But don't take this to mean nobody is using spring reverb or even spring reverb sounds though. Tons of guys are gigging with Twins and DR's, etc. What do you think the input stage on those amps goes though? And they take dirt pretty well.

I gigged with a 63 tank in front of my Matchless for many years. Country, rock, blues, and gospel (never surf or rockabilly). It also took dirt from a TS9 as well as any and sounded great. Not really much different than an amp with built in spring reverb as most use the reverb as an input stage anyway. Not everyone using spring reverb uses a drippy surf type sound. In fact, I'd say a vast majority don't. As I posted earlier, I've replaced mine with a Flint because its smaller, lighter, and does more. But if it first and foremost didn't sound really dang close to my tank, it would have been a non-starter.

Ryan84
05-26-2013, 01:10 AM
yeah but a tone of those guys think the FRV-1 is king... I thought it was terrible, digital artifacts all over the place. And too bright.

My thoughts exactly. It's impossible to dial out the trebly harshness no matter where you set the tone knob. It's a shame because of the artifacts and the brightness. I was just talking about this in another thread. If Boss smoothed those issues out it could really be a contender.

hardys
05-28-2013, 03:00 PM
Has anybody compared the Wampler Faux Spring to the Mad Professor Silver Spring? I just heard a demo of the SS and it sounds great, though not as springy as the FS.

Snufkinoob
05-28-2013, 03:03 PM
From what I've heard (All the demo's I guess that means) the Silver Spring seems more suited to clean, jazz playing high quality reverb than all-out splashing surf.... maybe.

FromTheBassMent
05-28-2013, 03:15 PM
I think the answer to the OP's question depends on what type of "spring reverb" sound is being sought. If it's the sound of a small tank inside of a typical Fender combo amp, then yes, it's hard to beat the Wampler. If it's the sound of one of those behemoth Fender external tanks, the Boss FRV-1 actually does the best job of any pedal I've used. But these reverbs are very different in character! The FRV-1 can get that huge, drippy sound that you need for surf music or covers of songs by the Cramps. The Wampler cannot (not sure what other pedal can do that... haven't found one better than the FRV-1, so that's the one that's a permanent part of my rig... lives in the back of my amp patched into the effects loop).

hardys
05-28-2013, 03:40 PM
I think the answer to the OP's question depends on what type of "spring reverb" sound is being sought. If it's the sound of a small tank inside of a typical Fender combo amp, then yes, it's hard to beat the Wampler. If it's the sound of one of those behemoth Fender external tanks, the Boss FRV-1 actually does the best job of any pedal I've used. But these reverbs are very different in character! The FRV-1 can get that huge, drippy sound that you need for surf music or covers of songs by the Cramps. The Wampler cannot (not sure what other pedal can do that... haven't found one better than the FRV-1, so that's the one that's a permanent part of my rig... lives in the back of my amp patched into the effects loop).

As the OP, I guess I should have qualified what type of spring verb I'm looking for. I'm not so concerned about large tank vs small tank emulation, because I like them both for different reasons. I'm also not so concerened that the drip isn't totally accurate. My main desire is finding a pedal that has the natural warmth and relative feel of a tank, as opposed to rooms, plates and halls found in digital studio gear. A case in point is the Wet pedal, that so many people around here like. While the demos I've heard sound great, it's just not the sound I have in my head while playing through a guitar amp. It's too pristine sounding if that makes sense and reminds me more of a studio verb than an amp with a tank (big or small).

augur
05-29-2013, 11:11 AM
WOW! This Wampler Faux sounds so Right! (Faux = Wrong in French, which I am)

I have a Boss FRV-1 for 2 years, and is really harsch sounding, always using tone control not more than 9 o'clock.
I don't use it that much since.

It sounds to me closer to a Twin Reverb at high settings.
Nice.....and complementary with my Deluxe Reverb clone...

valcotone
05-29-2013, 11:35 AM
I gig in a somewhat traditional blues band and will cast another vote here for the Wampler... I preferred it to the Spring Theory, Verbzilla, and EH Holy Grails I've had. The Flint is good too and very close in sounds to the Wampler (to my ears).

hardys
05-29-2013, 12:48 PM
I gig in a somewhat traditional blues band and will cast another vote here for the Wampler... I preferred it to the Spring Theory, Verbzilla, and EH Holy Grails I've had. The Flint is good too and very close in sounds to the Wampler (to my ears).

Very interesting. Were you able to listen to the Flint side-by-side to the Wampler? If it's as good as the Wampler, another $70.00 gets you a tremelo pedal with the Flint, too. That's something to think about for me.

valcotone
05-29-2013, 01:47 PM
Very interesting. Were you able to listen to the Flint side-by-side to the Wampler? If it's as good as the Wampler, another $70.00 gets you a tremelo pedal with the Flint, too. That's something to think about for me.


Yes, I still have them both. I would be happy with either at a gig. I use a Pareidolia on my gigging board for the swampy trem sounds, so I use the Flint for grab-n-go for other things or around home. I think the key is they sound and respond similar to each other and both have a tone control so you can dial them in fairly close.

mlj_gear
05-30-2013, 01:30 PM
As the OP, I guess I should have qualified what type of spring verb I'm looking for. I'm not so concerned about large tank vs small tank emulation, because I like them both for different reasons. I'm also not so concerened that the drip isn't totally accurate. My main desire is finding a pedal that has the natural warmth and relative feel of a tank, as opposed to rooms, plates and halls found in digital studio gear. A case in point is the Wet pedal, that so many people around here like. While the demos I've heard sound great, it's just not the sound I have in my head while playing through a guitar amp. It's too pristine sounding if that makes sense and reminds me more of a studio verb than an amp with a tank (big or small).

Based on this, I think you would be very happy with the Wampler. I am VERY picky about my reverb, and I really love the Wampler (despite what I said about the Surf Rider). My main amp is an early silverface Deluxe Reverb, and the Wampler compares very favorably to that amp's on-board reverb.

mlj_gear
05-30-2013, 01:39 PM
Does have a tone knob on it you know...
I think a lot of people honestly would find a real external tank (especially in front of an amp) to sound pretty terrible. Its not a very versatile sound in the least.

"Terrible" is probably an overstatement, but I actually agree with you for the most part. I do love my Guyatone tank -- even more that the reissue Fender tanks and the clone of the original Fender tank that I owned -- but I actually prefer my SFDR's reverb or the Wampler for most purposes.

I have never tried the Fender pedal. I have always assumed that I would not love it due to the fact that I have never loved a Boss reverb pedal. The only really mass produced reverb pedal I have really cared much for is the EHX Holy Grail/Holy Grail Plus, and certainly I prefer the Wampler to that.

One thing I REALLY like about the Wampler is that the clean signal is never digitized. That is a major plus to me. That, and I do prefer true bypass. The lack of those features also keeps me away from the Fender pedal. I'd like to try one, though.

hardys
05-30-2013, 01:43 PM
WOW! This Wampler Faux sounds so Right! (Faux = Wrong in French, which I am)

I didn't know that. I always just assumed it mean fake. Thanks for the translation! Next time I get into an argument with my ex, I'll spring this on her..."Hey ho, you're FUAX!"

hardys
05-30-2013, 01:58 PM
Based on this, I think you would be very happy with the Wampler. I am VERY pick about my reverb, and I really love the Wampler (despite what I said about the Surf Rider). My main amp is an early silverface Deluxe Reverb, and the Wampler compares very favorably to that amp's on-board reverb. The Surf Rider seems like a great pedal and is more versitle and less money that the Wampler, but he noise you mentioned about the SR worries me. I plan on placing a reveb pedal on top of my amp and running it through the FX loop with short patch cords. Most pedals I've placed there are fairly quiet (Boss DD-20, Memory Lane Jr., Flashback, etc.), but a few hum badly up there near the amps transformers.

lux_interior
05-30-2013, 02:48 PM
One thing I REALLY like about the Wampler is that the clean signal is never digitized.
...the dry.


I just browsed through the official page of the pedal, and Proguitarshop's page, and came across some over-the-top comments against other reverbs...

http://www.wamplerpedals.com/faux/spring-reverb.html:
You can buy any number of reverb pedals these days that sound like everything, they give you plates, halls, springs, rooms, gates, reverse halls... even reverse plates - who needs a reverse plate reverb? So many options that in all honesty, you will never use. It may be great to play with at home but would you ever use them..? Probably not.

Well, who told you that? Of course people do. Not only those who like to experiment instead of playing the same old tones like everybody else, but everyone who wants this variety of options there for a purpose: to choose what you like the most and use it. So many multimode reverbs (or delays or any multieffect, for that matter) have always been very successful exactly due to the fact that they are versatile and can provide different tones when you need them for different purposes. You are offering an effect that does just one thing particularly well... there's no need to make a rather silly attempt to convince people that everything else is useless.

The great thing about the Faux Spring Reverb is that it retains the Analog base tone, doesn't send your signal through digital/analog converters and back again (wrecking your tone completely) allowing you to be as springy as you like without your sound becoming lifeless, dull and... well, bad. So everyone that is foolish enough to do this the hard way (sending it through a high quality low noise AD/DA instead of simply keeping it analog) automatically wrecks people's sound completely, and makes it lifeless, dull and bad. Is that right?

lux_interior
05-30-2013, 02:49 PM
http://proguitarshop.com/wampler-faux-spring-reverb.html:
There are a lot of reverb pedals out there with so many options it 's hard to choose but really, are you going to use the reverse-gated-triple plate-hall-cathedral-slapback reverb live or just when you 're bored at home?

I haven't heard anyone stacking six modes at once, but if they are referring to the Eventide Space, it's also there for a purpose, and that is also to create sounds that I haven't heard from any other pedal (while also providing all usual bread-and-butter sounds with excellent quality). So you can find people that like to experiment by using it in unique ways with their guitars, vocals, drums, keys, special FXs, mixes etc etc away from their homes while being anything but bored.

mlj_gear
05-30-2013, 07:28 PM
So everyone that is foolish enough to do this the hard way (sending it through a high quality low noise AD/DA instead of simply keeping it analog) automatically wrecks people's sound completely, and makes it lifeless, dull and bad. Is that right?

While it's perfectly possible for a pedal to convert your dry signal to digital and back again and maintain the tone of the original dry signal very well, my experience is that an awful lot of pedals don't do so.

Webfoot
05-30-2013, 07:40 PM
I just received a wampler reverb today and its the most natural full bodied pedal reverb I have ever played through. I wish I could shorten the tails at times but that is a minor nit. Very natural and rich sounding.I can only stand about 5 seconds of listening to those 'other' digital reverbs or washy cathedral sounding.

Chonny
05-30-2013, 08:37 PM
My favorite Reverbs are the Blue Sky, the WET, and the Wampler. Any of these are going to get you some great sounds its going to come down to your own personal preference as to which reverb sound you think is your ideal sound.

btdvox
05-30-2013, 08:47 PM
Its my goal to make people stop thinking the Surf Rider is a spring reverb, its not. I bought it thinking it was, and was very disappointed.

They actually don't even say it has a spring sound specifically in the marketing, but the name makes people think it does. Thats why I bought one and I assumed with a name like Surf Rider it had to be a spring type reverb. Right ? Wrong.

It is a Belton brick based reverb, not a spring emulation. Its got the typical Belton pre-delay and it can get kind of a cool retro reverb sound, which does sound great, but is has ZERO DRIP

Simple test; Crank up the reverb and just slap the strings, what do you hear ? A slapback delay sound.

It does not do the percussive "drip" effect of a real tank because the Belton Brick can't do that.

Except it says Spring Reverb right on their website lol

"Surf Rider Deluxe
The Surf Rider Deluxe is an amazingly authentic spring reverb pedal..."

ruger9
05-30-2013, 09:12 PM
While it's perfectly possible for a pedal to convert your dry signal to digital and back again and maintain the tone of the original dry signal very well, my experience is that an awful lot of pedals don't do so.

+1.

hardys
05-31-2013, 07:47 AM
...the dry.


I just browsed through the official page of the pedal, and Proguitarshop's page, and came across some over-the-top comments against other reverbs...

http://www.wamplerpedals.com/faux/spring-reverb.html:


Well, who told you that? Of course people do. Not only those who, like to experiment instead of playing the same old tones like everybody else, but everyone who wants this variety of options there for a purpose: to choose what you like the most and use it. So many multimode reverbs (or delays or any multieffect, for that matter) have always been very successful exactly due to the fact that they are versatile and can provide different tones when you need them for different purposes. You are offering an effect that does just one thing particularly well... there's no need to make a rather silly attempt to convince people that everything else is useless.

So everyone that is foolish enough to do this the hard way (sending it through a high quality low noise AD/DA instead of simply keeping it analog) automatically wrecks people's sound completely, and makes it lifeless, dull and bad. Is that right?

You're going a bit off topic from what this thread was originally based on. So far it's been very positive & informative, with everyone commenting on their experiences with the sound qualities of the Wampler & other similar spring type pedals. It would be great to keep it positive & share opinions on pedals, rather than retailer's advertisements.

augur
05-31-2013, 12:19 PM
I just bought one Faux Spring 2nd hand, I think I'm gonna sell my Boss FRV-1.
I have already a Fender tank unit if I need this sound at home...

lux_interior
05-31-2013, 12:27 PM
@hardys: Positive towards the pedal... meaning that there should be no criticism involved?

hardys
05-31-2013, 12:39 PM
@hardys: Positive towards the pedal... meaning that there should be no criticism involved?

Was my comment so convoluted as to imply we shouldn't say anything negative about pedals? If so, please allow me to clarify. The topic of discussion, up until your post, was focused on comparisons of reverb pedals. While there have been negative & positive comments on those pedals, the general tone of this thread has been upbeat, informative and on topic. My response to your post was to help keep things that way and not to sidetrack the thread with critiquing retailer's advertisements. If you have some input regarding your experience with the Faux Spring or other reverb pedals, I'd love to hear about it.

B-Nads
05-31-2013, 12:42 PM
I preferred the Surf Rider Deluxe over the Wampler, but both sound great.

Snufkinoob
05-31-2013, 12:44 PM
http://proguitarshop.com/wampler-faux-spring-reverb.html:


I haven't heard anyone stacking six modes at once, but if they are referring to the Eventide Space, it's also there for a purpose, and that is also to create sounds that I haven't heard from any other pedal (while also providing all usual bread-and-butter sounds with excellent quality). So you can find people that like to experiment by using it in unique ways with their guitars, vocals, drums, keys, special FXs, mixes etc etc away from their homes while being anything but bored.

The 'reviews' like that are clearly made by Hawaiian shirt, cargo shorts and croc wearing dad-rockers who only listen to Hendrix and Floyd. The world revolves around them and their tone apparently. :cool:

I always imagine them sat with their guitar laid over their beergut literally moments after plugging the pedal in, with their computer switched on, by their side, ready to tell the internet how they know tone while they lay on the slick and creamy blooz.


Based on this, I think you would be very happy with the Wampler. I am VERY pick about my reverb, and I really love the Wampler (despite what I said about the Surf Rider). My main amp is an early silverface Deluxe Reverb, and the Wampler compares very favorably to that amp's on-board reverb.

Does the Wampler gets as loud in the mix as the Surf Rider, or is it more of a subtle reverb pedal?

Snufkinoob
05-31-2013, 12:45 PM
I preferred the Surf Rider Deluxe over the Wampler, but both sound great.

See above! Is the Wampler the more subtle of the two?

lux_interior
05-31-2013, 01:18 PM
Was my comment so convoluted as to imply we shouldn't say anything negative about pedals? If so, please allow me to clarify. The topic of discussion, up until your post, was focused on comparisons of reverb pedals. While there have been negative & positive comments on those pedals, the general tone of this thread has been upbeat, informative and on topic. My response to your post was to help keep things that way and not to sidetrack the thread with critiquing retailer's advertisements. If you have some input regarding your experience with the Faux Spring or other reverb pedals, I'd love to hear about it.

Fair enough, but it did appear a bit too "forum police"-y while I still see lots of TGP threads every day get way more off-topic concerning completely different gear (or even topics!) than the original we are supposed to comment on. So what I am adding to my previous comments on the Wampler Faux Spring is that it does a very good job, but to my ears it's certainly right in the middle of the spring reverb emulation competition without necessarily being better or worse... just different.

bh.
06-01-2013, 12:29 AM
I really like the Van Amps Sole-mate, Jr. It feels natural like the reverb on my amp.
The Wampler does a good reverb emulation too, but I felt that it changes the attack of my dry signal -- will be uploading a comparison video in a bit. It shows how they both affect the dry signal by having the mix knob set to the lowest (The Wampler boosts the dry signal too when the mix is at 0).

p.s. I had the RV-5, Wampler FS, EHX HG Nano, and the Spring Chicken v1 (I actually really liked this one too but traded it off when I didn't need reverb. Now they're hard to find.) Still, i think the Van Amps is the best for me.

bh.
06-01-2013, 01:08 AM
Here's the video: http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showthread.php?p=15630312#post15630312

hardys
06-01-2013, 04:24 PM
Here's the video: http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showthread.php?p=15630312#post15630312

Wow! Great video. Thanks for that! I was about to pull the trigger on the Wampler, but after listening to your demo, I'm thinking those slap back repeats on the Wampler will bug me after awhile. From reading threads here, it seems that all Belton Brick pedals have that slap back going on. Hmmmm...

bh.
06-02-2013, 02:11 AM
Sure thing! Glad to help:)

Che_Guitarra
06-02-2013, 02:53 AM
I think it depends on what you personally typify as the 'best' spring reverb. I cut my teeth on Dick Dale, the Surfaris, the Atlantics, the Ventures and the whole genre of '60s surf (in the '90s!), therefore a pedal that models a Fender 6G15 reverb unit is what I call 'home'.

IMO the Boss FRV-1 does a near flawless job of putting that sound in a pedal. It's become the essential reverb on my board... but a little goes a long long way. Outside of playing Bombora i'd say the dwell and mixer pots rarely venture beyond 9 o'clock. As long as you understand this i'd say it's my 'verb of choice.

Steve73
06-02-2013, 03:01 AM
Owned a bunch of verbs and my fav for tone and features is the Tech 21 Boost RVB. I can dial it in to sound identical to my '67 Pro Reverb but it can do so much more. It really flies under the radar.

stevieboy
06-02-2013, 11:38 AM
I didn't know that. I always just assumed it mean fake. Thanks for the translation! Next time I get into an argument with my ex, I'll spring this on her..."Hey ho, you're FUAX!"

It means false, or wrong, or imitation, depending on context.


But it's an adjective, not a verb.



(See what I did there?!!! :banana )

Webfoot
06-02-2013, 12:56 PM
I just got the Wampler but watched the vid and liked the clean base tone of the Van Amps.

But then I went to the website and saw you actually have a 2nd unit a full size spring tank that plugs into the control unit... so not pedal board friendly.

I think the Wampler over all has good clarity and natural sound and no noise... but I wish they treat the base tone a little flatter and change one of the knobs to change the length of the tails (may not be possible depending on the chip used).

stevieboy
06-02-2013, 02:00 PM
I just got a Carl Martin Headroom, speaking of springs.

It's very pedal board friendly. It's likes pedal boards so much, it tries to hog all the space for itself!

Haven't had much chance to play it, I will over the next couple of days though.

abnerfm
06-02-2013, 02:16 PM
If the Wampler is Belton brick based, does it have headroom issues?

hardys
06-05-2013, 09:40 AM
If the Wampler is Belton brick based, does it have headroom issues?

Is that a common issue with Belton Brick pedals?

midwayfair
06-05-2013, 12:11 PM
Is that a common issue with Belton Brick pedals?

Not exactly. There are brick-based designs that can take quite a bit of punishment. The brick module does run on 5v, so it has some headroom problems (just like the PT2399 delay chip), but if the pedal is built right it can be avoided.

I was really impressed with Wampler's take on the Belton when I played through it at the Amp show on Sunday. Hadn't really seen much talk about it. The bricks sound great and are super quiet anyway, but the tone control on the FSR had a very useful range and it's not exactly a common feature on BB-based designs.

B e n
06-05-2013, 12:48 PM
I did an in-store head to head test with a bunch of verb pedals. Wampler and Tone Candy came the closest to my '64 Fender Spring verb. I would've been totally happy with either but I ended up choosing the Tone Candy because of the mix knobby for dry/fx level, esp. great for hi gain leads, very clear undisturbed dry notes cut thru with a little verby-ness underneath. Master volume knobby is nice too for a quick output adjustment at the very end of my pedal chain, and can serve as a clean boost when turned up.

abnerfm
06-05-2013, 12:49 PM
Is that a common issue with Belton Brick pedals?I can only tell about the ones I've had or tried (Hermida Reverb and "DIY" kit)... yes, they have serious headroom problems. But the Hermida particularly sounded gorgeous, especially clean

mlj_gear
06-26-2013, 02:25 PM
Wow! Great video. Thanks for that! I was about to pull the trigger on the Wampler, but after listening to your demo, I'm thinking those slap back repeats on the Wampler will bug me after awhile. From reading threads here, it seems that all Belton Brick pedals have that slap back going on. Hmmmm...

Of course real spring reverb has a slap-back delay effect if you hit it hard, too... :)

woland
06-26-2013, 02:41 PM
TC Electronics Hall of Fame.
2 reasons:
1. I dont care about spring reverb all that much
2. Have several stereo effects so need stereo reverb
3. Like variety

Faldoe
06-26-2013, 03:02 PM
Anyone wanna let me borrow their Faux Reverb so I can trace it?

spiral
08-10-2013, 09:38 PM
I know this is old but the Boss FRV-1 is the best spring reverb pedal i've tried. At one time i had the Hall of Fame, Hardwire reverb, Wampler Faux Spring, and Spring Theory to compare. The Boss was the only one that reproduced the EQ curve, particular attack and decay, and "drip" of a Fender tank. The others sounded like a spring, but too linear i guess. It truly sounds like a Fender tank and blew me away. Try one before you make your decision.

kurt1981
08-14-2013, 05:01 PM
I actually love my shadow amplification reverb pedal, I think it gets that slightly drippy combo amp reverb feel, maybe not 100% but darn close. I had the hardwire, but it added some weird artifacts to my sound, and had similar issues with the holy grail, and a couple others. Wolld like to try the subdecay sometime. Nothing'll ever quite capture that tank mounted in a combo amp for me anyway,

BadMonkey007
08-14-2013, 06:25 PM
my vote: Supernatural

5GDsGZpJ5rM

randalp3000
08-14-2013, 07:16 PM
In a band mix I prefer the Neunaber Wet Reverb. It's interesting to note that Neunaber designed the reverb modules which come in short, medium, and long decays.

I also have a Cusack Sweet Verb prototype that I will be trying this weekend at a gig. The sweet verb has variable decays which should be nice. It also has separate dry and verb levels so you can get only reverb with no dry like on the old Gibson amps if you like. That could be pretty cool in a stereo setup.