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mtmartin71
05-29-2013, 09:57 AM
I'm 43. I "thought" I was in good shape. I work out frequently with weights and I started doing body weight circuit and other conditioning, but I haven't played a competitive sport in a long time. If you don't count softball (and who would!), then it's probably been since my 20s when I played in a basketball league. Since trying Crossfit and now volleyball just recently, I've had two rotator cuff capsule sprains in the past 6 months and a pulled hammy. The first rotator cuff capsule sprain came from doing snatches in Crossfit. Literally heard a pop and was worried I tore it. That healed up and just recently I started trying volleyball. I went to go for my first spike in a skills refresh class and re-sprained it although not as severe as the first time. The next day I played in a pickup game for beginners and thought I tore my hamstring when I abruptly dug my leg in on grass service to dig a low ball. Thankfully it appears only to be a mild to moderate sprain.

Here is what I've learned since trying to get back into group/competitive fitness endeavors. First, I need to properly stretch before doing anything. Second, I need to take care of my right shoulder by focusing on some targeted strengthening exercises...I want to avoid surgery to correct it. Third...I need to somehow turn off my competitive mind from my 20s. Every time I do something where it's a competition, I get after it and my brain thinks in terms of where it used to be vs. the reality of my body today. This is what happened at Crossfit. I'm in a room of people and I'm probably the oldest guy and I'm competing to lift the heaviest weight. Volleyball...same concept. In each case, I went after it with no holding back and hurt myself in the process.

My questions go out to TGP folks in my age range. First, how do you guys dial things back? Do you just avoid competitive sports altogether or did you find a way or a sport that didn't create that conflict? What competitive sports and type of leagues have you been able to play in where you can stay relatively healthy? Golf is not something I'm interested in by the way. I'd really like to see if I can stick with volleyball (co-ed) but that may not be good on my body or realistic at my age.

clarkram
05-29-2013, 10:40 AM
I don't know how the rotator cuff fits into this, but I would suggest tennis, in my area there are many teams, and several leagues for men and women, all ages, seniors are considered 45 plus.

very competitive.

MGT
05-29-2013, 11:00 AM
I'm 48, a hockey player and I don't dial back at all. I played in two leagues this past season...one was the most competitive division of old timers (which is 35 & up) and the other was a church league (where the only thing church like is the name of the teams!) where most of the players are in their twenties.

While I have lost a bit of speed in the last few years, playing smart and having excellent conditioning is what makes the difference for me. I also find that my diet & rest make a huge difference in my recovery or ability to play each game....when I was in my 20's/30's, it didn't matter so much. A good warm up & stretching routine also helps.

I work out with weights 6 days a week - 3 heavy days and three light days where I teach Body Pump at Good Life (it's a fitness/gym chain in Canada....maybe the US, too?). In the summer, I play pickup hockey twice a week....no matter how much I work out, there is nothing quite the same as actually playing to keep me in game shape. Some sort of interval training would help, though, I'm sure.

Ron_R
05-29-2013, 11:44 AM
I am 40 and had many injuries from competitive sports (downhill skiing, MMA, bodybuilding) over the years and got really sick a couple of years ago.

Competitive sports are out for me, but I cycle for exercise. I compete against myself and the clock on the GPS on my road bike.

charveldan
05-29-2013, 11:47 AM
"Boomer-itus" ... term by medical pro's to describe sports injuries of middle age & older men.

:munch

redgold
05-29-2013, 11:54 AM
I gave up my weekly basketball game in my early forties. I started to get frustrated trying to chase 20 yr olds. I would love to find an over 40 game. These days I have a catch with my son or we play tennis.

neil99
05-29-2013, 11:56 AM
Just turned 46, still play ice hockey one or two times a week. Hang out on D, let the kids go for the glory. Competitive(ish), still gotta get up for work in the AM.

Definitely lost a step or two over the 20something guys that show up. Age and wisdom can still triumph over youth and exhuberance (now and again)

psychodave
05-29-2013, 11:58 AM
I practice Martial Arts. I can compete in non-combative or combative tournaments. I can do as much or as little as I want/can do. The benefit is not only exercise, but I know how to defend myself as well. I'm in my 40's... :)

RichSZ
05-29-2013, 12:24 PM
The problem is you. Seriously. I'm laughing because I'm the same way. Going to be 43 in June. Competitive crossfitter, hockey player, softball guy (lol), and soon to be novice Olympic Lifter.

After a few injuries in my late 30's and very early 40's you really have to adjust your mind. I thought I could still do the same sh!t as I could on my 20's. And some stuff I can do better now but the potential for injury is greater now. It's just a fact that our bodies are older, less flexible, and more prone to injury.

So keep doing what you're doing but know how important proper warm up is. When you do your Oly lifts in crossfit realize that proper form is key. Yes, some can muscle through some lifts but proper form and engaging the right muscles will prolong your ability to lift injury-free. The biggest thing w/ Oly lifts is to work up to heavy weight. If you tore your rotator cuff you may need to work on your form and go lighter. Jump and shrug that bitch and drop under the bar, don't yank it or push it with your shoulders.

Fred132
05-29-2013, 12:37 PM
Tennis. I know people still playing competitively in their 80s.

Granted, they play against other geezers, but it's great for mobility.

tjs
05-29-2013, 12:38 PM
Believe it or not Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a great option.

First of all it is possible to be competitive with many of the young whippersnappers by being more skilled than them (though of course if they're comparable in skill to you then there's not much you can do. That's true of any sport though - skill + athleticism beats skill alone any day.) So you can feed your competitive nature without being as frustrated as you would in a sport where it's more difficult to overcome physical disadvantages.

Second, because there's no running/jumping involved you're much less likely to suffer an exertion injury. You're not going to pull a hammy trying to run like you did when you were a teenager, for example.

Third, the full body workout you get from that sport is second to none, and the flexibility gains you'll experience will actually help you avoid injury in the future.

Don't get me wrong: you WILL be sore a good portion of the time and injuries do occur, but if you're smart about your training they'll usually be relatively minor and infrequent.

I know people in their late 60s who are not only still training, but who regularly dominate people twice their size and a third of their age. A couple of them didn't even start training until they were in their late 40s, so it's definitely within your reach if you want it.

JWDubois
05-29-2013, 12:39 PM
I played hockey until 50 until the combination of a chronic groin pull and the leagues around here going to crap made me hang it up.

Through my forties, in both hockey and cycling I was slower at the start, but a lot of the time the young guys weren't actually in as good shape as they thought they were, and shot their wads early. Just keeping the same pace, I often ended up faster at the end of the game than them.

ACfixer
05-29-2013, 12:39 PM
They probably have a pinochle league at your local senior club.

MartinPiana
05-29-2013, 12:51 PM
Slow down. If you're returning to or beginning strenuous sport, ease into it. And yes, stretch stretch stretch. I'm 56, surf more than 10 times a month, take a significant surf trip each year. Strength is harder to retain, harder to regain and we're less flexible as we get older. You have to take better care of your body than before and perhaps be more aware of its limits. But to me, it's all worth it.

straightblues
05-29-2013, 02:14 PM
You aren't too old. But you aren't young anymore either. You need to go slow and build up to it and no just jump in with both feet. You can't do that at your age anymore. You need to retrain your mind. You will get back there quickly, but you do have to spend the time building yourself back up or you will get hurt. You mind knows how to do it, but you body has to catch up.

Dave2512
05-29-2013, 03:36 PM
I raced BMX cruiser until I was 42 and it was brutal. Got back into it at 39, raced at the expert level in my youth. Some of those guys never stopped racing so I pretty much finished last in every race. I couldn't train my way back into being competitive.

The only competitive thing I do now is golf and believe it or not it's been the source of more injuries than anything I've done previously. My PCP knows I'm there due to a golf injury if he sees my name on his appointment list. Last year was my first year back to golf since my 20's and I don't remember it being so hard on the body. I've had to take breaks due to injuring my back, elbow, wrist, hand, knee and neck. Falling off the bike was less traumatic than golf.

Jarrett
05-29-2013, 03:44 PM
Believe it or not Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a great option.

Don't get me wrong: you WILL be sore a good portion of the time and injuries do occur, but if you're smart about your training they'll usually be relatively minor and infrequent.

I got out of BJJ at 38 due to injuries. But mostly it was due to rolling with MMA wannabe meatheads. And I couldn't recover quick enough between classes anymore. I wish I could find a gi school near me that rolled slower and more controlled. I certainly miss it. Know of any on the south DFW area?

Lately (at 42) I've been biking and playing racquetball. Both are sports that I think could be done safely into later years. I'm not looking to compete in any of the above personally.

Smakutus
05-29-2013, 03:47 PM
I still play 40 and over baseball.. I'll be 50 in November.

Jeff

27sauce
05-29-2013, 03:53 PM
I still play 40 and over baseball.. I'll be 50 in November.

Jeff

There's a league in my town who's games I catch every once in a while. Some of these guys are OLD, but they can all play, big time. Its like watching an MLB(a couple played in the bigs) game on slow motion.

Smakutus
05-29-2013, 03:59 PM
There's a league in my town who's games I catch every once in a while. Some of these guys are OLD, but they can all play, big time. Its like watching an MLB(a couple played in the bigs) game on slow motion.

We use 10 on the field, no lead offs, no stealing. Guys aged 35 can play, but not pitch until they're 40.

We have guys in their 50's and 60's still playing and guys that have played in the minors that can still bring it for an inning or so.. It's a lot of fun. I hadn't played softball in years before joining this league almost four years ago.

I wish we could shorten the fields and play only 9 etc.. Maybe when we start a 50 and over. <g>

Jeff

Stevil
05-29-2013, 04:00 PM
http://www.thedayofgames.com/pictures/photostouse/bocce%20ball%20photos/Bocce%20Ball%20Grass.JPG
http://www.scene75.com/wp-content/themes/nathanstaines-starkers-html5-b84e76d/images/bocce/1.jpg

Hugh_s
05-29-2013, 04:03 PM
Believe it or not Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a great option.

First of all it is possible to be competitive with many of the young whippersnappers by being more skilled than them (though of course if they're comparable in skill to you then there's not much you can do. That's true of any sport though - skill + athleticism beats skill alone any day.) So you can feed your competitive nature without being as frustrated as you would in a sport where it's more difficult to overcome physical disadvantages.

Second, because there's no running/jumping involved you're much less likely to suffer an exertion injury. You're not going to pull a hammy trying to run like you did when you were a teenager, for example.

Third, the full body workout you get from that sport is second to none, and the flexibility gains you'll experience will actually help you avoid injury in the future.

Don't get me wrong: you WILL be sore a good portion of the time and injuries do occur, but if you're smart about your training they'll usually be relatively minor and infrequent.

I know people in their late 60s who are not only still training, but who regularly dominate people twice their size and a third of their age. A couple of them didn't even start training until they were in their late 40s, so it's definitely within your reach if you want it.

I couldn't agree more. I'm in my 40's and practice BJJ. Good training, great competition and great fun.

RussTKD
05-29-2013, 04:06 PM
I got out of BJJ at 38 due to injuries. But mostly it was due to rolling with MMA wannabe meatheads. And I couldn't recover quick enough between classes anymore. I wish I could find a gi school near me that rolled slower and more controlled. I certainly miss it. Know of any on the south DFW area?

Lately (at 42) I've been biking and playing racquetball. Both are sports that I think could be done safely into later years. I'm not looking to compete in any of the above personally.

Same thing. My shoulder is borked from playing a Les Paul since high school, and too many years of combat sports. I was 39 when I went to my last BJJ class and decided it was time to hang up the gi. I couldn't take the falls from a simple hip throw, and would tap whenever someone looked at my left arm.

Now I run, and I'm starting to dabble with triathlons.

Best thing about Tris is they put your age on your calf, so when you pass that guy in front of you, you know he's 28, and he sees you're 41.

Swimming is hard though.

Hugh_s
05-29-2013, 04:10 PM
Also, if you want to find out just how out of shape you are, try mountain biking. I've never participated in a sport that is anywhere near as humbling or as exhilarating.

Fred_C
05-29-2013, 04:23 PM
I'm 43 also. While this probably doesn't count as competitive sports, I did my first ski descent of a 14er on Saturday, and ran a 10k on Monday. Thought I'd be able to get up the next day and work out - not. I can hardly walk now. It feels like I'm going to rupture an Achilles tendon with each step.

joe_jr
05-29-2013, 04:30 PM
At 54 I have only begun to tap my potential as a competitive pie eater.

DirtLover
05-29-2013, 04:34 PM
Notice a common thread here? Fast twitch, high impact, sprinting/agility based sports changing to more slow twitch, endurance based activities.
I'm 43, hung up the soccer cleats last year after foot sugery (which is along recovery) so I can concentrate on the endurance stuff - running, biking swimming, sometime all at once in triathlons.
I have the problem of chronic soccer related strains, pulls, etc... Funny, now that I don't play, I don't have those issues any more...
I love the endurance stuff and being outside and while I'm not necessarily competitive I do 'compete' in races and enjoy the proces of prepping for the event.
I also do crossfit but without any interest in competing at it and I check my ego at the door - I have some wrist and shoulder issues that could really F. me up if pushed too far. I push it at times but it's the mobility that I think will be my greatest asset at this stage of the game.
Oh yeah, I did compete in a curling league this year. Good times, injury free!

ksandvik
05-29-2013, 04:35 PM
Squash.

mtmartin71
05-29-2013, 04:37 PM
Lots of good stuff and feedback. Thanks everybody. Some takeaways...I need to mentally and physically prepare differently for these kinds of things. I have to spend some thought about dialing back how aggressive I get with something before I even get out there...and be OK with that! I also absolutely need to remember to stretch before doing any of this stuff.

Ideal situation for me is to find a semi-competitive co-ed sport. Part of my interest in getting back into something competitive or team oriented was making new friends...maybe even meeting some women that way. As a divorced Dad with 95% of my friends being married, it's tougher to have a social connection to people. I'm always the 3rd wheel. I could easily get back on a men's softball team but I'd just be hanging around a bunch of dudes and probably many I know. Still...I'd do that just to have that excuse to get out in the world more. The sad part of getting old if you have no one in your life is not only do you start losing the physical prowess you had, but your network of friends and social connections shrink because people are busy with their families. Band used to give me some of that but I haven't been gigging since November of last year so that's not been an option. A big part of taking these endeavors back up is to avoid hermit-dom!

Anyhoo, I still want to see if I can make volleyball work but you all reminded me of some other good activities as well.

art_z
05-29-2013, 05:04 PM
I did my first open water swim race last year at age 45. Came in second in the 1.5 mile race beaten by a 23 year old. Been training my ass off this year hoping to win. There was plenty of youngsters behind me including the 18 year old who finished a few seconds behind me. While they do say age is in your mind, I can't train like I did in college. Need a lot more recovery time between really grueling days. That being said I'm in the pool 6 days a week, 100k yards a month, every month.

derekd
05-29-2013, 05:18 PM
I'm 52 in a couple of months. In the past 4 years I've had surgery to repair an ACL, torn labrum and rotator cuff, and a nasty navel hernia, all from martial arts, but with their roots in playing football in HS, and basketball through college. My other shoulder is acting up now.

I quit basketball about 8 years ago. After 34 years of martial arts and going under the knife so many times recently, yoga and tai chi are looking better every day. I still lift lightly and hit the pool and treadmill, but that's about it. Competitive sports no longer have any appeal.

I wish you luck with it. I'll be in the stands with a beer cheering you on.

MartinPiana
05-29-2013, 05:56 PM
I did my first open water swim race last year at age 45. Came in second in the 1.5 mile race beaten by a 23 year old. Been training my ass off this year hoping to win. There was plenty of youngsters behind me including the 18 year old who finished a few seconds behind me. While they do say age is in your mind, I can't train like I did in college. Need a lot more recovery time between really grueling days. That being said I'm in the pool 6 days a week, 100k yards a month, every month.

If OP has any interest in swimming, there are Masters Swim classes/teams in every town. Most people are regulars, very good camaraderie and ... not only co-ed, but very fit women in ... you guessed it, bathing suits.

I've done this in three cities, met one longtime girlfriend at one. All levels are welcomed, it's very affordable, great exercise and good motivation since most of the swimmers are doing it for real.

When I decided to get down to business and practice guitar regularly a few years ago, swimming is what I gave up. As mentioned earlier tho, still surf a lot. Here's a shot from about five years ago, when I was only 51. (I've focused mostly on low-impact sports since having a knee operation - meniscus - around age 40.)

http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u143/martinpiana/surf1.jpg (http://s167.photobucket.com/user/martinpiana/media/surf1.jpg.html)

Killcrop
05-29-2013, 06:33 PM
Cycling or anything low impact is the way to go. Basketball is brutal. Same with beech volleyball. I have never had an injury from cycling, however I did engage in a drunken wrestling match recently and wrecked my neck.

Cycling, yoga and red wine. You will live forever. As long as you don't get hit by a car.

newking70
05-29-2013, 06:50 PM
maybe curling?

chrisjw5
05-29-2013, 08:13 PM
First of all it is possible to be competitive with many of the young whippersnappers by being more skilled than them

A quote from my high school history teacher, after he whipped our best basketball player one-on-one:

"age and treachery will always overcome youth and superior technology"

Of course we then found out he was a D1 college basketball star and the last man cut from an early-70's Celtics squad.

I still love the quote.

Smakutus
05-29-2013, 08:20 PM
Biking is really good for you.. I started riding last summer to get my legs in shape for baseball and it really helped. I had no injuries during the season, and didn't even get that sore the day after games. The cortisone shot to my shoulder helped too.. <g>

Jeff

antojado
05-29-2013, 10:14 PM
Slow down. If you're returning to or beginning strenuous sport, ease into it. And yes, stretch stretch stretch. I'm 56, surf more than 10 times a month, take a significant surf trip each year. Strength is harder to retain, harder to regain and we're less flexible as we get older. You have to take better care of your body than before and perhaps be more aware of its limits. But to me, it's all worth it.

You aren't too old. But you aren't young anymore either. You need to go slow and build up to it and no just jump in with both feet. You can't do that at your age anymore. You need to retrain your mind. You will get back there quickly, but you do have to spend the time building yourself back up or you will get hurt. You mind knows how to do it, but you body has to catch up.

This is exactly what I've found. Being out of cycling for many years it's taking longer to get back into it than when I was younger.

grill
05-29-2013, 10:29 PM
12oz curls and internet MMA. :)

nsureit
05-29-2013, 10:31 PM
I'm partial to hot dog or pizza eating contests.

ANALOG GUY
05-29-2013, 10:38 PM
Sailboat racing, in heavy sea's it's a 2 hour car crash, haven't done that for 10 years. I'm content to learn surfing these day's.

mtmartin71
05-29-2013, 11:23 PM
If OP has any interest in swimming, there are Masters Swim classes/teams in every town. Most people are regulars, very good camaraderie and ... not only co-ed, but very fit women in ... you guessed it, bathing suits.

I've done this in three cities, met one longtime girlfriend at one. All levels are welcomed, it's very affordable, great exercise and good motivation since most of the swimmers are doing it for real.

When I decided to get down to business and practice guitar regularly a few years ago, swimming is what I gave up. As mentioned earlier tho, still surf a lot. Here's a shot from about five years ago, when I was only 51. (I've focused mostly on low-impact sports since having a knee operation - meniscus - around age 40.)

http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u143/martinpiana/surf1.jpg (http://s167.photobucket.com/user/martinpiana/media/surf1.jpg.html)

Cool picture. Duly noted on swimming. Not a huge fan of it but my Dad has pushed that one too as something low impact.

FloridaSam
05-30-2013, 05:03 AM
There's some Mah Jhong games in West Boca that have a reputation for getting pretty brutal. Twice someone has almost had to push their Life Alert button.

RussTKD
05-30-2013, 06:57 AM
Notice a common thread here? Fast twitch, high impact, sprinting/agility based sports changing to more slow twitch, endurance based activities.

When I was a kid I was always better at endurance based sports, primarily cycling. But it was boring and not nearly as attractive to the ladies as football was. Unfortunately I don't have the genetics for football (or the size). Martial arts were a compromise as I still got to get the rush of hitting/being hit and didn't give up much of a penalty for my (lack of) size.

Now that I'm a runner, I'm wishing I had gotten into running and swimming as a kid. I could be one of those 40-something guys that people gripe about in races.

paranoid70
05-30-2013, 09:36 AM
I was thinking of playing basketball again with the guys from work... but this thread reminds me of all the knee, foot and shoulder injuries I used to get from playing ball when I was in my 20s!! I think I will stick to jogging, biking and weightlifting for exercise.

There is also frisbee golf if I feel like kicking my friends asses at a game. ;)

bluenote04
05-30-2013, 10:36 AM
I was all set to recommend "raw" powerlifting before I read your post. Nevermind!

I've been a competitive powerlifter since the mid 80s, but I'm currently in a state of semi-retirement due to a partially torn rotator cuff. Surgery is scheduled in two weeks. Looking forward to recuperating & hitting the heavy weights again.

Powerlifting is a sport that rewards those who blossom later in life. Those who reach the elite (national or world-class) level in their teens or twenties usually flame out by 30. If you can get well into your thirties without major damage, many athletes can stay competitive well into advance age.

I'm 47, and still getting stronger. I set a personal best squat in October, training for a meet. Once the shoulder is strong, I plan on taking back my State Champion title, and working toward getting back to a National meet. At 41, I was ranked as high as 6th in the nation. I'd like to push that a bit higher. ;o)

mtmartin71
05-30-2013, 11:24 AM
I was all set to recommend "raw" powerlifting before I read your post. Nevermind!

I've been a competitive powerlifter since the mid 80s, but I'm currently in a state of semi-retirement due to a partially torn rotator cuff. Surgery is scheduled in two weeks. Looking forward to recuperating & hitting the heavy weights again.

Powerlifting is a sport that rewards those who blossom later in life. Those who reach the elite (national or world-class) level in their teens or twenties usually flame out by 30. If you can get well into your thirties without major damage, many athletes can stay competitive well into advance age.

I'm 47, and still getting stronger. I set a personal best squat in October, training for a meet. Once the shoulder is strong, I plan on taking back my State Champion title, and working toward getting back to a National meet. At 41, I was ranked as high as 6th in the nation. I'd like to push that a bit higher. ;o)

I think for personal fitness, I'm definitely heading more this direction once I get my basement gym finished out, but it's not a target for competing for the reasons you saw. Then again, any community for anything I do like this is a connection into people and getting my a$$ out of the house. Very cool on what you've done competitively. My friend in Fallbrook is a personal trainer at 50 and he's cutting weight to compete in senior bodybuilding competition. He was also a competitive power lifter. Thankfully I didn't tear my rotator cuff but with two sprains in 6 months, I do worry or question whether doing snatches makes sense ever again.

jiml
05-30-2013, 12:55 PM
46 playing in an "over 30's" soccer league. No slide tackles, most teams are in it for the sweat and beers after. I'm a goalie, so running around is minimal, but our team stinks and I am diving (or flopping) a lot more.

I love it, I'm sore and battered after each game, but the league is a lot of fun and I am still surprisingly adequate back there!

I also play golf and sometimes ride the mountain bike...

GuitarGuy3
05-30-2013, 08:37 PM
Early 40's and I play lacrosse. After working with the public for the past 15 years I feel the need to go and hit people. But I don't want to go to jail for doing it.

grill
05-31-2013, 02:11 AM
There's some Mah Jhong games in West Boca that have a reputation for getting pretty brutal. Twice someone has almost had to push their Life Alert button.

mah jhong is no joke!!

JPF
05-31-2013, 02:51 AM
Sailing gives you a good workout whilst giving you the option of alleviating the heavy lifting by leaving that bit to the young'uns. It helps to live near the sea, though.

MontyW
05-31-2013, 03:36 AM
I am 48 years old. I play amateur Rugby (15 a side) - I spend more time on my warm up and light gym work than I did 20 years ago.

I also take calculated risks as opposed to just hitting players and hoping I didn't pick up an injury.

I take longer and I mean much longer to recover from the hits, but my game is probably more skillful as I don't have the physical robustness of my younger counterparts.

I love the game, the physicality and the social side to it all.

I also coach junior rugby so that I put something back into the sport that continues to give me so much enjoyment.

onemind
05-31-2013, 03:47 AM
I find it difficult trying to temper being competitive with the sad reality that I'm older and can't do the things I did when I was young. I don't put myself in situations where I "have" to win, I guess the mindset is everything is not a competition, though I used to think it was.

MontyW
05-31-2013, 04:04 AM
I find it difficult trying to temper being competitive with the sad reality that I'm older and can't do the things I did when I was young. I don't put myself in situations where I "have" to win, I guess the mindset is everything is not a competition, though I used to think it was.

That is a really interesting point. I competed as a road cyclist to a high level up to my early 30s and gave up when a 16 year old kid came past me effortlessly and I was at full bore.

I play rugby to a standard... not 1st team, but 4th and find even though some players are younger and some older, we play to a level that makes the competition similar.

Johnny V.
05-31-2013, 04:28 AM
I'm a late in life jock at 61 years old. Started ski racing at 50 (with no racing backround), started mountain biking at 56 and have done my second and third mountain bike races this past month. Most ski race leagues are done in 5 year increments, so you're competing against guys your own age, while it seems bike racing is usually 40 + which makes it tougher. As long as I finish and am not DFL in my group, I'm satisfied(but always want to be better!) Great feeling to finish ahead of folks 20-30 years younger.

I figure most guys my age are sitting on their butts,so anything I do is good. Beautiful morning-going for a ride right now...............

MGT
05-31-2013, 07:33 AM
I am 48 years old. I play amateur Rugby (15 a side) - I spend more time on my warm up and light gym work than I did 20 years ago.

I also take calculated risks as opposed to just hitting players and hoping I didn't pick up an injury.

I take longer and I mean much longer to recover from the hits, but my game is probably more skillful as I don't have the physical robustness of my younger counterparts.

I love the game, the physicality and the social side to it all.

I also coach junior rugby so that I put something back into the sport that continues to give me so much enjoyment.

I used to think I was somewhat tough playing hockey (I've had to get stitches many times - most recently in February when I caught a puck right next to my eye) and then my daughter started playing rugby in high school. Saw lots of broken noses, collar bones, dislocated shoulders. You guys hit HARD and with no padding at all!

bluenote04
05-31-2013, 11:49 AM
If you decide to continue with the snatch, I'd suggest seeking out a good Olympic Weightlifting coach. Even elite level Crossfitters have technique that varies from outstanding to awful. A few of them are competitive at the national level WL (Lindsey Valenzuela is one) but many of the athletes I saw on the Crossfit Games were simply adequate at best, using brute strength to get the left, which is a no-no for that sport.

I dabbled in the snatch & clean and jerk for a little bit, but I found it very foreign to me, and it beat me up pretty good from receiving the bar out of position. I wish I had tried them sooner, but at the time I had to make a choice, and I decided to serve the master that I competed in.

Fatboy666
05-31-2013, 12:10 PM
51 years old here. I ride a road bicycle 3-4 times a week. Usually 6-8 miles per ride. Once a week or so, I try to run a mile or two - works different muscles. These I do as cross training for my main sport - skateboarding. I race slalom and giant slalom competitively in the US and Canada. Masters Class - 45 and up. I also skate at skateparks now and again. I don't recommend the latter! Falls on concrete hurt, especially when you lock up on the coping and it's a six foot swan dive.

But other than the falling part, slalom skating is fairly low impact on joints and works legs and core pretty well. If you combine the skating with the new push sticks, you can get a good arm/shoulder workout. Like paddle surfing on land. And you can do it anywhere there's pavement.

RichSZ
06-11-2013, 07:51 AM
If you decide to continue with the snatch, I'd suggest seeking out a good Olympic Weightlifting coach. Even elite level Crossfitters have technique that varies from outstanding to awful. A few of them are competitive at the national level WL (Lindsey Valenzuela is one) but many of the athletes I saw on the Crossfit Games were simply adequate at best, using brute strength to get the left, which is a no-no for that sport.

I dabbled in the snatch & clean and jerk for a little bit, but I found it very foreign to me, and it beat me up pretty good from receiving the bar out of position. I wish I had tried them sooner, but at the time I had to make a choice, and I decided to serve the master that I competed in.

Right on with this. I'm a crossfitter and have been doing steady Oly lifting for over a year w/ a coach who was a medal winning women's team coach for many years. I think for the 1st ten months I barely added weight to build muscle or strength. What I did do is develop technique and form, as well as all the supporting muscles to do the lifts correctly. It's an amazing thing to be able to snatch 225lbs correctly. There was a time when (due to horrible form and technique) 95 lbs felt heavy and painful in all the wrong places.

Tahitijack
06-11-2013, 12:33 PM
Every winter I sign up for the NASTAR and try to reduce my best time from the prior season. From time to time I ride a lift with folks in their mid to late 70's...and think to myself there is plenty of time left for me to enjoy skiing. Skiing is competitive but you are really on your own flying down the course.

DYNA BILL
06-11-2013, 12:49 PM
I'll be 61 next month. It's like a competition just to get out of bed every morning.

jkg
06-11-2013, 02:01 PM
I'm 43. I "thought" I was in good shape. I work out frequently with weights and I started doing body weight circuit and other conditioning, but I haven't played a competitive sport in a long time. If you don't count softball (and who would!), then it's probably been since my 20s when I played in a basketball league. Since trying Crossfit and now volleyball just recently, I've had two rotator cuff capsule sprains in the past 6 months and a pulled hammy. The first rotator cuff capsule sprain came from doing snatches in Crossfit. Literally heard a pop and was worried I tore it. That healed up and just recently I started trying volleyball. I went to go for my first spike in a skills refresh class and re-sprained it although not as severe as the first time. The next day I played in a pickup game for beginners and thought I tore my hamstring when I abruptly dug my leg in on grass service to dig a low ball. Thankfully it appears only to be a mild to moderate sprain.

Here is what I've learned since trying to get back into group/competitive fitness endeavors. First, I need to properly stretch before doing anything. Second, I need to take care of my right shoulder by focusing on some targeted strengthening exercises...I want to avoid surgery to correct it. Third...I need to somehow turn off my competitive mind from my 20s. Every time I do something where it's a competition, I get after it and my brain thinks in terms of where it used to be vs. the reality of my body today. This is what happened at Crossfit. I'm in a room of people and I'm probably the oldest guy and I'm competing to lift the heaviest weight. Volleyball...same concept. In each case, I went after it with no holding back and hurt myself in the process.

My questions go out to TGP folks in my age range. First, how do you guys dial things back? Do you just avoid competitive sports altogether or did you find a way or a sport that didn't create that conflict? What competitive sports and type of leagues have you been able to play in where you can stay relatively healthy? Golf is not something I'm interested in by the way. I'd really like to see if I can stick with volleyball (co-ed) but that may not be good on my body or realistic at my age.

Given your location I'd spend all of my free non-work and family time skiing, fishing, running and mountain biking, not necessarily in that order, and if you need a team sport I'd play softball with the guys as an excuse to drink a few beers with the gang and talk about skiing, fishing, mountain biking and the local professional sports teams :D

Ken Ho
06-11-2013, 02:46 PM
The suggestions about tennis and cycling are good ones.
In my skin cancer clinic, I saw a lot of old ducks who spent a lot of I've out in the sun. Many of them were still playing in late 70's, earl 80's, and notable for their fitness, agility, good posture and bones and overall health
The skin cancer was a small price to pay in exchange for all of that.
I have not played any competitive sport for 20 years, but did an IM 70.3 last year, and have gone around in a few cycling road races recently. I keep getting dropped out of the main pack, and did finish DFL last weekend, but someone has to, and a wooden spoon comes in handy for cooking anyway.
Just dial back your expectation, and you can enjoy anything. I'm 49 btw.

Jig, above, has it right. Ski-ing, MTB, trail running, etc, all great things.
Went single track MTB with my wife for the first time a few days ago. It was muddy but fun, and she had a ball.