PDA

View Full Version : spaghetti western tones?


jmoss5347
07-29-2013, 09:33 AM
I want to be able to get awesome western/desert like tones out of my rig. You know, those sounds you associate with the sun beaming down and vultures circling. Im looking for recommendations for a pedal/combination of pedals that could achieve this kind of sound. I already have the wet reverb so unless there is a really good spring simulation that I dont know about then I'm probably sticking with that. My amp doesn't have spring reverb unfortunately. Any help is greatly appreciated.

lespaul3013
07-29-2013, 09:36 AM
Strymon Flint

/thread

lefort_1
07-29-2013, 09:48 AM
jazzmaster
fender amp with a nice splashy spring reverb

why go high-tech? Not needed at all.

jmoss5347
07-29-2013, 09:52 AM
I actually already play an AVRI Jazzmaster but I don't see myself changing amps, I just don't have the funds right now. i've owned the flint before and I have considered that option again, the only thing is that I like having trem before delay but reverb after delay.

guitarslinger21
07-29-2013, 09:55 AM
I'm confused on "Spaghetti Western Tones".

In my mind, it's like Duane Eddy playing a clean gretsch in a canyon,(which this particular head just happens to corroborate) yet every "spaghetti western" pedal is a fuzz.

Does anybody have a youtube clip of Fuzz in a clint eastwood movie?

lefort_1
07-29-2013, 10:05 AM
if spaghetti/surf is a big commitment in you musical scene, then the amp is probably needed. If playing out, the cred of using the right amp makes a big difference to that scene...at least it did about 8 years ago when I had some exposure there.

The Flint is about 3hundy, right?

How much for an RV-5? or a Hardwire? Or a Spring Theory?
They should get you in the ballpark, espec if $$ are the issue.

78deluxe
07-29-2013, 10:06 AM
I'm pretty sure the correct answer is a mosrite fuzzrite

What is this Strymon nonsense?

telefactor
07-29-2013, 10:07 AM
34bedxd_bIU

guitarslinger21
07-29-2013, 10:07 AM
I'm pretty sure the correct answer is a mosrite fuzzrite

What is this Strymon nonsense?

Do you have any examples of fuzz guitar in this type of music?

I want to hear it.

jmoss5347
07-29-2013, 10:13 AM
if spaghetti/surf is a big commitment in you musical scene, then the amp is probably needed. If playing out, the cred of using the right amp makes a big difference to that scene...at least it did about 8 years ago when I had some exposure there.

The Flint is about 3hundy, right?

How much for an RV-5? or a Hardwire? Or a Spring Theory?
They should get you in the ballpark, espec if $$ are the issue.

Its not really a big deal for my live playing, its more for recording purposes. I really want to get a DRRI but it's just going to have to wait. I don't think fuzz is my solution here. I'm more interested in really huge sounding clean tones. Maybe my idea of spaghetti western tones is a little different as well?

78deluxe
07-29-2013, 10:14 AM
I'm confused on "Spaghetti Western Tones".

In my mind, it's like Duane Eddy playing a clean gretsch in a canyon,(which this particular head just happens to corroborate) yet every "spaghetti western" pedal is a fuzz.

Does anybody have a youtube clip of Fuzz in a clint eastwood movie?

Yes, many of the spaghetti western tones are rather clean with just some verb.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQGGQ-FCe_w

But at the same time, many use some fuzz to gritty up a theme.

wyatt
07-29-2013, 10:14 AM
Basic surf guitar setup. Reverb BEFORE amp.

You don't want an amp with on-board reverb, surf (and spaghetti western) is rooted in outboard reverb units. So, the Wet should work fine...just don't put it in a loop...get it in front of the amp. A tremolo bridge and single coils on the guitar are useful as well.

I'm confused on "Spaghetti Western Tones".

In my mind, it's like Duane Eddy playing a clean gretsch in a canyon,(which this particular head just happens to corroborate) yet every "spaghetti western" pedal is a fuzz.

Does anybody have a youtube clip of Fuzz in a clint eastwood movie?

Best example probably isn't Eastwood, but Once Upon a Time in the West.

Guitar comes in around 1:05
MrzukPzGqow

Of course there is also the remix, guitar waits until 3:30 here
_AtFoMaofg0

saladin
07-29-2013, 10:21 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_zeiKrRTuk

lefort_1
07-29-2013, 10:21 AM
After re-listening to a good number of spaghetti western themes in the past half hour, I have come to the conclusion that wahat you want out front of the amp is
































a harmonica

78deluxe
07-29-2013, 10:25 AM
Do you have any examples of fuzz guitar in this type of music?

I want to hear it.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azTCWP8nZNg&list=PL1D9E1FE69F2D2EA0

I agree, that what you generally hear is most Ennio recordings are rather clean guitars. Though there is some low fuzz like dirt on some of them.


But check out Once Upon a Time in the West.

GarMan
07-29-2013, 10:28 AM
Basic surf guitar setup. Reverb BEFORE amp.

You don't want an amp with on-board reverb, surf (and spaghetti western) is rooted in outboard reverb units. So, the Wet should work fine...just don't put it in a loop...get it in front of the amp. A tremolo bridge and single coils on the guitar are useful as well.



Best example probably isn't Eastwood, but Once Upon a Time in the West.

Guitar comes in around 1:05
MrzukPzGqow

Of course there is also the remix, guitar waits until 3:30 here
_AtFoMaofg0

Yep! That is the Spaghetti Guitar tone there! That piece is f'ing incredible! :bow

jmoss5347
07-29-2013, 11:55 AM
Some of the guitar work in this song is an example of the kind of sound I'm looking to get. Definitely trem and verb, just dont know exactly what to go for. And again, the flint wont do it for me because I like having trem before delay and verb after delay.

5iVRuAUKrds

guitarslinger21
07-29-2013, 12:00 PM
After re-listening to a good number of spaghetti western themes in the past half hour, I have come to the conclusion that wahat you want out front of the amp is


a harmonica

LOL, I'm thinking that too!

mrpinter
07-29-2013, 12:18 PM
Listen to the example at 5:05.

eMe2Sfe8c9A

chrismellotron
07-29-2013, 12:20 PM
A Telecaster, a Fender Deluxe Reverb or Twin Reverb, a Basic Audio Pale Rider and your done. You got Verb, Tremolo, FUZZ and a twangy guitar.

V
07-29-2013, 12:34 PM
I don't think a tele is necessarily the right kind of twangy, though. To me, a big part of that sound comes from sympathetic resonance behind the bridge and i think a lot of the guitars used originally in that genre were actually semi-hollow.

You would do well with like a burns guitar probably, or a jazzmaster, or a gretsch, or a rickenbacker 330.

You definitely want it to have some weird ringy overtones.

As for the pedals, I would say definitely a 60s style fuzz but not a fuzz face or tonebender, probably. I prefer a fuzzrite or maestro type sound there. Something with a nasal sound and then you want reverb. I personally find it just fine to use onboard amp reverb for those kinds of sounds but most reverb pedals will do ok for this (maybe not a bluesky or something like that but it might be ok with the right setup).

This tune I have been working on has some kind of spaghetti western tones in it (though not with fuzz. I think there maybe a bit of light od in there or else my amp's reverb is distorting a bit. I don't remember).

Guitar is a parts-o-jazzmaster with a tuneomatic bridge and a third pickup behind the bridge.

https://soundcloud.com/cjmventer/v-you-are-an-island

GreenKnight18
07-29-2013, 12:57 PM
In my understanding/version of "Spaghetti Western" guitar sounds it's big reverb and a bit of fuzz. I never hear any telecaster-type sounds. Strats, Jazzmasters, Jaguars and some hollowbodies. I don't really hear much trem and definitely no delay.

That Atlas Sound Parallax song is more spacey sounding. If you want trem --> delay --> reverb then it sounds like you already have a sound you like? Have you tried that out?

squished
07-29-2013, 12:59 PM
Baritone Danelectro, tremolo, and spring reverb.

GarMan
07-29-2013, 01:01 PM
In my understanding/version of "Spaghetti Western" guitar sounds it's big reverb and a bit of fuzz. I never hear any telecaster-type sounds. Strats, Jazzmasters, Jaguars and some hollowbodies. I don't really hear much trem and definitely no delay.

That Atlas Sound Parallax song is more spacey sounding. If you want trem --> delay --> reverb then it sounds like you already have a sound you like? Have you tried that out?

It is my understanding that the guitar used on The Good, The Bad, and They Ugly score was a Telecaster.

jmoss5347
07-29-2013, 01:06 PM
That Atlas Sound Parallax song is more spacey sounding. If you want trem --> delay --> reverb then it sounds like you already have a sound you like? Have you tried that out?

The song overall is spacey, I'm referring more to the specific guitar work with the heavy trem & verb. I dont actually own a trem pedal, thats something that I need but there are just so many options.

la noise
07-29-2013, 01:11 PM
Do you have any examples of fuzz guitar in this type of music?

I want to hear it.


This was recently discussed in the "Strictly Fuzz" thread in some length and detail. The overall consensus---and conclusion--was that we all remember and imagine fuzz guitar in spaghetti westerns that never actually existed. :bonk

There are few if any actual instances of fuzz being used in spaghetti westerns in the 60's and 70's.

Yet..... so many of us imagine it was there???? Or actual remember what never was. :D

FrankieSixxxgun
07-29-2013, 01:14 PM
I get that tone by plugging in a single coil guitar (like a Telecaster or a Gretsch) -> compressor set to moderate attack and moderate output -> analog delay set for slapback -> mostly clean amp (like my Super Reverb). You can tick tack and carter pick that rig for days and it sounds authentic. You can add a little reverb if you need it to sound even bigger, but the slapback and compressor make it sound pretty huge.

Peteyvee
07-29-2013, 01:17 PM
Frankie knows of what he speaks...

GreenKnight18
07-29-2013, 01:18 PM
It is my understanding that the guitar used on The Good, The Bad, and They Ugly score was a Telecaster.


I have read that it was a Jazzmaster, and I have read it was a Stratocaster. I think I may have also read that it was a Jaguar. Now I can add Telecaster to the list. My half-assed guess based on lazy internet searching is that it was a Strat and Pino Rucher was the guy that played it.

Either way: if you get a a bit of fuzz into a bunch of spring reverb you can get some amazing sounds. Personally I play a Jaguar into a DR clone and I have a mossrite/maestro type fuzz clone called the Ennio that is built by a TGP member.

Big clean guitar into reverb on a pushed amp gets more into Surf sounds-- another realm I quite enjoy.

Aran
07-29-2013, 01:19 PM
All I need is a Tele, good Reverb and play against the bridge. ;) Delay can sub as a Reverb but imho the verb makes the tone.

dmckean44
07-29-2013, 01:42 PM
You should pick up a baritone guitar too.

Zacharia Matilda
07-29-2013, 02:10 PM
You should pick up a baritone guitar too.

Yes. One other poster mentioned baritone guitar, as well. You need to start there.

tjmicsak
07-29-2013, 02:25 PM
http://www.bigfootfx.com/uploads/2/9/5/1/2951867/4562966_orig.jpg

http://www.bigfootfx.com/

seiko
07-29-2013, 02:28 PM
Boss FRV 1 is pretty damn good for these types of reverb sounds.

It has a limited palate but that range is: Western twang to Surf to Roland S Howard. Clearly 3 great flavours to have.

Mosrite-style fuzz sounds right to me but you could probably get a lot of the vibe with any 60s style fuzz and picking HARD at the bridge.

vorvick
07-29-2013, 03:14 PM
Baritone Danelectro, tremolo, and spring reverb.

I was waiting for someone to bring up the bari...

FuzzFaceJ
07-29-2013, 03:24 PM
this is my favorite Spaghetti western music, from my favorite Spaghetti western film

J84FPJAb7rM

I just use a cleaned up fuzz face with some delay and a Strat, one doesn't need to do it exactly how the original was done for great results

JesterR
07-29-2013, 03:45 PM
I would not refer to any particular soundtrack, but I believe, that for that kind of vibe fender guitar (Strat, tele or other single coil) thin fuzz (fuzzrite, fuzztone or any other clone) and reverb (I do not think, that spring is best choice. Maybe some plate- style for big and long reverb without too much of spring artifacts) is all you need.

Everything else like any part particular guitar or another things like delay or tremolo is the matter of taste. I believe most important is right notes and volume knob for lo-fi dirty tones with your fuzz pedal.

Laurent Brondel
07-29-2013, 03:46 PM
Pino Rucher (http://www.pinorucher.it)

Peteyvee
07-29-2013, 03:55 PM
No comprendo Italiano, amigo...

king_of_the_road
07-29-2013, 03:56 PM
Awesome Spaghetti tones with an average TGP Pedal board.

XjimEZpBPUE

chrismellotron
07-29-2013, 04:29 PM
http://www.bigfootfx.com/uploads/2/9/5/1/2951867/4562966_orig.jpg

http://www.bigfootfx.com/ I've always liked this FUZZ.

Kitten Cannon
07-29-2013, 04:43 PM
I never get the fuzz thing. But reverb, a good trem... the Flint could definitely pull it off, and a good guitar/amp combo. Baritone helps immensely. Jerry Jones 6-string bass, even. I have a baritone Tele, and I love messing around with it for these things.

Not a gear suggestion, but this album is a great place to start:
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51KKvYOjHmL._SY300_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/Dorado-James-Wilsey/dp/B001110QJ2)

Laurent Brondel
07-29-2013, 06:59 PM
Pino Rucher (http://www.pinorucher.it)

No comprendo Italiano, amigo...He's the guitarist who played on Morricone's spaghetti western soundtracks, just looking at the pics will give at least an idea of what guitars he used.

BluesHarp
07-29-2013, 07:14 PM
Can do.

Hope you dont mind me tearing it up. :BluesBros

Otherwise I suggest giving a $5 chinese harp to someone tall and lanky who doesnt play anything yet and tell him to practice the thing for a couple months... should work just fine.


After re-listening to a good number of spaghetti western themes in the past half hour, I have come to the conclusion that wahat you want out front of the amp is
































a harmonica

raph
07-29-2013, 07:15 PM
some practice, old guitar into cranky old amp will get you there and more. no pedals needed.

lefort_1
07-29-2013, 07:41 PM
Can do.

Hope you dont mind me tearing it up. :BluesBros

Otherwise I suggest giving a $5 chinese harp to someone tall and lanky who doesnt play anything yet and tell him to practice the thing for a couple months... should work just fine.

By all means....blow dat thing!!!

I always wondered if the conductor really wanted an accordion, but knew he'd have a hard time selling it to the producers. "But you see, the American Bob Dillon playz a mouth harp... all those deep American pockets will be dug deeply for $$ to hear our lilting Italian fresco of aural reed soundz"

...or however they say that shi# in Salerno.

chrismellotron
07-29-2013, 07:57 PM
I never get the fuzz thing. But reverb, a good trem... the Flint could definitely pull it off, and a good guitar/amp combo. Baritone helps immensely. Jerry Jones 6-string bass, even. I have a baritone Tele, and I love messing around with it for these things.

Not a gear suggestion, but this album is a great place to start:
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51KKvYOjHmL._SY300_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/Dorado-James-Wilsey/dp/B001110QJ2)If you heard Ennio's Once Upon a Time In the West soundtrack, you'd totally understand Spaghetti Western FUZZ. The FUZZ is slathered on real thick on a few tracks.

H.P. Lovecraft
07-29-2013, 08:33 PM
Maestro Fuzz Tone
Spring Reverb
Tremolo

Kitten Cannon
07-29-2013, 08:55 PM
If you heard Ennio's Once Upon a Time In the West soundtrack, you'd totally understand Spaghetti Western FUZZ. The FUZZ is slathered on real thick on a few tracks.

I've seen the movie and I've heard what you're talking about, I just never thought of that as the most seminal or widespread spaghetti western guitar tone. Great film though. Need to watch that one again...

seiko
07-30-2013, 08:28 AM
Alessandro Alessandroni is usually credited as *the* Morricone guitarist

If you go beyond the classic spaghetti westerns you find fuzz all over, tape echo and even wah too. Although the other classic elements you want are mouth harp, nylon string guitar and the ability to whistle.

V
07-30-2013, 09:05 AM
Based on the images on his site, Alessandroni definitely used a strat by the 60s so there's a good contender. Seems he's still playing it too, based on the more recent images.

chrismellotron
07-30-2013, 10:17 AM
I've seen the movie and I've heard what you're talking about, I just never thought of that as the most seminal or widespread spaghetti western guitar tone. Great film though. Need to watch that one again...4 bars of FUZZ = 4 minutes of twang.

bschultzjames
07-30-2013, 10:23 AM
You should pick up a baritone guitar too.

Yes. This.

chrismellotron
07-30-2013, 10:24 AM
Yep. Baritone guitar was mentioned earlier.

deadlands
07-30-2013, 11:53 AM
That doesn't sound spaghetti western to me at all. More of a Neil Young inspired Americana sound and playing.


Awesome Spaghetti tones with an average TGP Pedal board.

XjimEZpBPUE

0xeneye
07-30-2013, 11:56 AM
Did Strymon exist in the 60's? Why suggest that?
How about a reverb amp instead and try putting a rag between your strings for serious damping.

kp8
07-30-2013, 12:39 PM
I get pretty good spaghetti western / spy movie fuzz from the SolidGoldFX Agent13. I honestly don't think you need the exact period correct gear to evoke those sounds. Anything with plenty of twang will get you started. YMMV.

mcnabbanov
07-30-2013, 01:35 PM
anything wrong with a blue sky set on Spring mode??

interesting thread breaus

apeape
07-30-2013, 01:38 PM
All you need is a guitar with a Bigsby.

cubistguitar
07-30-2013, 01:53 PM
how is this sick sound made exactly??

CSyt-GwzJQs

ennio is a master of combining wild sonorities for film, the guitarists had to have open minds

mcnabbanov
07-30-2013, 01:56 PM
tone is in the fingers

deadlands
07-30-2013, 02:10 PM
Check out the band Spindrift for a psychedelic take on Spaghetti Western.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEgNebSjNyA&list=PLEF2A18A5C17615AC

cubistguitar
07-30-2013, 02:10 PM
here is another ennio, he likes a little fuzz with his choirs and harmonicas

CYN5fB_k-uw&list=PL97EBD11BC0D5AE90

eddie knuckles
07-30-2013, 02:15 PM
My Walrus Audio Jupiter Fuzz can be dialed in accordingly and then also cover a whole world of fizz, fuzz and sputtering kablam!

cubistguitar
07-30-2013, 02:20 PM
just a lil bit fuzzy , wouldn't you say??

F6BSiO8S79Y

seiko
07-30-2013, 02:22 PM
how is this sick sound made exactly??

CSyt-GwzJQs

ennio is a master of combining wild sonorities for film, the guitarists had to have open minds

Fender guitar, likely a strat, 60s fuzz, sounds like a maestro to me, reverb, I'm thinking outboard spring.

Vox and Hohner amps would probably have been much easier to find in Italy than Fenders in the mid-60s.

cubistguitar
07-30-2013, 02:38 PM
love this nast-nasty fuzz-wah behind the rhythmic piano intro. just composin with sound there, nice ennio

not a western but ennio is worth a listen anytime
jJhm0CtjNUU

neat one here too
O6zqjBc8fFE&list=PL138F5F65DAA59F86

cubistguitar
07-30-2013, 02:41 PM
GTR and bassoon i think, i don't get jam enough with bassoonists, course lots going on in this one, killer string writing, tom, toms, sounds like some direct to console gtr too maybe,lots goin on. very psyche western music

qwgYDf58g5U&list=PL138F5F65DAA59F86

wyatt
07-30-2013, 04:01 PM
how is this sick sound made exactly??

CSyt-GwzJQs

ennio is a master of combining wild sonorities for film, the guitarists had to have open minds

Fender guitar, likely a strat, 60s fuzz, sounds like a maestro to me, reverb, I'm thinking outboard spring.

Vox and Hohner amps would probably have been much easier to find in Italy than Fenders in the mid-60s.

That's not a guitar at all. I wish I could remember the name of of it, but it was an electric equivalent of a hammer dulcimer...one of those '60's things that never really caught on, not unlike the Baldwin Electric Harpsichord, which Morricone also used for some soundtracks. Lots of dulcimer and harpsichord stuff with Morricone.

jrcorp
07-30-2013, 04:16 PM
Awesome thread, love the movies and love the sounds. It's showing my nerdy side, but the soundtrack to Red Dead Redemption was at the least a good try at this style. I used to try to pick it out, usually just melodies strongly based off notes of an Am. Simple but great.

I never would have thought of fuzz tones, so obviously I have some listening to do. I wouldn't mind buying some Morricone soundtracks.

chrismellotron
07-30-2013, 04:41 PM
Ennio loved a good nasty FUZZ, no question about it.

cubistguitar
07-30-2013, 05:20 PM
Awesome thread, love the movies and love the sounds. It's showing my nerdy side, but the soundtrack to Red Dead Redemption was at the least a good try at this style. I used to try to pick it out, usually just melodies strongly based off notes of an Am. Simple but great.

I never would have thought of fuzz tones, so obviously I have some listening to do. I wouldn't mind buying some Morricone soundtracks.

Try "Crime and Dissonance" for the bizarre works in his catalog and "The Platimun Collection" for a deep study of his best.

chrismellotron
07-30-2013, 07:30 PM
Ennio is an AMAZING composer. The Grand Massacre being one of my favorites.

presence
07-30-2013, 10:53 PM
I never get the fuzz thing. But reverb, a good trem... the Flint could definitely pull it off, and a good guitar/amp combo. Baritone helps immensely. Jerry Jones 6-string bass, even. I have a baritone Tele, and I love messing around with it for these things.

Not a gear suggestion, but this album is a great place to start:
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51KKvYOjHmL._SY300_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/Dorado-James-Wilsey/dp/B001110QJ2)

+100 Great album!

rumbletone
07-30-2013, 11:22 PM
Spring reverb in front of an amp. Perhaps a trem too. Flint would be a great choice for a compact digital unit that covers both. A Fender tube reverb unit into a Fender with onboard trem would be ideal imo.

If you're into Morricone and want to check out some more adventurous interpretations - not to mention a ridiculous line up of guitarists (frisell, quine, Vernon Reid, Fred Frith ....) - have a listen to John Zorn's the Big Gundown.

la noise
07-30-2013, 11:53 PM
Have you tried whistling??? :D

Seance
07-31-2013, 01:01 AM
Not sure if this qualifies as "spaghetti Western", but Cut Corners by
The Sadies is a song with a high lonesome plaintive feeling and
a cutting fuzz sound.

VivRetb7rZ0

SirGilmour
07-31-2013, 01:21 AM
How the hell did one of the most primitive forms of music make it to page 6 with suggestions on how to achieve tonal spaghetti western nirvana!?

JesterR
07-31-2013, 03:33 AM
Not sure if this qualifies as "spaghetti Western", but Cut Corners by
The Sadies is a song with a high lonesome plaintive feeling and
a cutting fuzz sound.

VivRetb7rZ0

Yeah. Not actual very close to OP question, but anyway, they have many great sounds. Surf-style fuzzes, big reverb pads and other stuff. And all that in wonderful music context.

MIM#1
07-31-2013, 03:42 AM
Maybe member Uma Floresta will chime in.If my memory serves me he and his band do the spagetti western thing really well.
But I agree with other posters that a bigsby equiped guitar and bridge pickin' with ample spring reverb will get you pretty much all you need.

bongomania
07-31-2013, 03:44 AM
How the hell did one of the most primitive forms of music make it to page 6 with suggestions on how to achieve tonal spaghetti western nirvana!?
You think Morricone's compositions and productions were primitive? Or are you thinking about "country and western"?

jmoss5347
07-31-2013, 09:09 AM
Wow, this thread has really gotten interesting, love some of these clips! Just to reiterate, Im looking for specific options for pedals, mainly reverb and trem combinations. And as previously stated, I am not really interested in the flint for placement reasons. Also, a baritone guitar is out of the question for me and so is a new amp unfortunately.



If you're into Morricone and want to check out some more adventurous interpretations - not to mention a ridiculous line up of guitarists (frisell, quine, Vernon Reid, Fred Frith ....) - have a listen to John Zorn's the Big Gundown.

I love Zorn's interpretation of The Big Gundown, one of my favorites b him.

EDIT: Im looking for specific pedal recommendations, not just the type of effect.

Mosley
07-31-2013, 09:13 AM
Heavy gauge flat wound strings on a single coil guitar + spring reverb.

SirGilmour
07-31-2013, 09:16 AM
You think Morricone's compositions and productions were primitive? Or are you thinking about "country and western"?

Im talking the tone, not the compositions. Guitar, amp, reverb. :)

phil esposito
07-31-2013, 10:03 AM
http://exclaim.ca/MusicSchool/WhatIPlay/dallas_travis_good

deadlands
07-31-2013, 10:04 AM
Maybe member Uma Floresta will chime in.If my memory serves me he and his band do the spagetti western thing really well.
But I agree with other posters that a bigsby equiped guitar and bridge pickin' with ample spring reverb will get you pretty much all you need.

My band does a sort of psych-surf-spaghetti western thing. IMO, the style is less about the tone of the guitar and more about playing style, note choice and composition.

But the question has been answered many times on this thread and the consensus is a single coil guitar picking close to the bridge, reverb and twang bar will get you close to the classic tone, but the other 80% of it is inspiration and musical choices.

phil esposito
07-31-2013, 10:04 AM
And of course....

from a few years ago in Hoboken

http://i441.photobucket.com/albums/qq134/cornbread4019/IMG_1456-1.jpg

http://i441.photobucket.com/albums/qq134/cornbread4019/IMG_1431.jpg

http://i441.photobucket.com/albums/qq134/cornbread4019/IMG_1469.jpg

http://i441.photobucket.com/albums/qq134/cornbread4019/IMG_1523.jpg

deadlands
07-31-2013, 10:12 AM
Wow, this thread has really gotten interesting, love some of these clips! Just to reiterate, Im looking for specific options for pedals, mainly reverb and trem combinations. And as previously stated, I am not really interested in the flint for placement reasons. Also, a baritone guitar is out of the question for me and so is a new amp unfortunately.


EDIT: Im looking for specific pedal recommendations, not just the type of effect.

Fender FRV-1 for the reverb for sure. That seems to be the only pedal that can get close to the Fender Reverb Unit sound.

To qualify my opinion, I have a DIY Fender Reverb Unit and I have a Spring Theory, Spring Chicken, Spring and the Fender FRV-1. When I don't have my Reverb Unit, I always use the FRV-1. It just gets a lot closer that real tank sound than the other pedals. Also I'm not a fan of Boss pedals, but I have to give them this one.

For tremolo ... any thing that does a tube style tremolo will work well. I built a few BYOC tremolo's and they sound great for this style. You could easily pick one up pre-built off ebay for less than $50.

JesterR
07-31-2013, 10:29 AM
My band does a sort of psych-surf-spaghetti western thing. IMO, the style is less about the tone of the guitar and more about playing style, note choice and composition.


Can you post some links on your music? I am interested in music, which you play, so it would be nice to hear it...

Seance
07-31-2013, 10:38 AM
Reverb and tremolo and fuzz pedals seem to be all you need.
I have a Boss '63 Fender Reverb. I like it. Some fuzz in the Maestro
area might work.

Playing a Gretsch or Telecaster with a Bigsby vibrato might not hurt.
But other Fender single-coils with vibrato (called tremolo) will work
just as well.

Other than that... it probably comes down to approach.
One falsetto voice and one baritone voice can work just as
well as whistling or harmonica. Or at least they do in Dying Is Easy.

UGL4Aa8xPNA

deadlands
07-31-2013, 10:47 AM
Can you post some links on your music? I am interested in music, which you play, so it would be nice to hear it...

Here ya go:
https://soundcloud.com/deadlands-chicago

This is our previous incarnation with two guitars and a vocalist. Most songs are instrumental but there are a couple of vocal tracks that aren't really in the SW/surf/twang style. This is also before I got the Reverb Unit. The reverbs here are Spring Chicken and Fender amp verb.

We lost our guitarist/vocalist and now we are 3 piece doing almost all instrumentals.

JesterR
07-31-2013, 10:55 AM
Here ya go:
https://soundcloud.com/deadlands-chicago

This is our previous incarnation with two guitars and a vocalist. Most songs are instrumental but there are a couple of vocal tracks that aren't really in the SW/surf/twang style. This is also before I got the Reverb Unit. The reverbs here are Spring Chicken and Fender amp verb.

We lost our guitarist/vocalist and now we are 3 piece doing almost all instrumentals.

Great music and nice guitar tone. I love it.

deadlands
07-31-2013, 12:15 PM
Great music and nice guitar tone. I love it.

Thank you, sir!

We are starting our next recording this weekend, some new tunes and the rehashed 3-piece versions of some of these songs. The new stuff has a lot of surf inspiration and we also have a better drummer than what's on the old recordings.

Snufkinoob
07-31-2013, 12:34 PM
Sounds excellent. What guitars are you using?

hydroquebec
07-31-2013, 01:04 PM
Here ya go:
https://soundcloud.com/deadlands-chicago

This is our previous incarnation with two guitars and a vocalist. Most songs are instrumental but there are a couple of vocal tracks that aren't really in the SW/surf/twang style. This is also before I got the Reverb Unit. The reverbs here are Spring Chicken and Fender amp verb.

We lost our guitarist/vocalist and now we are 3 piece doing almost all instrumentals.

This is super cool stuff!

deadlands
07-31-2013, 01:11 PM
Sounds excellent. What guitars are you using?

Thanks!

Those recordings were with a '93 MIJ Jaguar with AVRI pickups. The other guitarist was using a '69 Gibson SG with Vibrola.

Now I'm using an '04 CIJ Jazzmaster with Pickup Wizard CBS pickups. And the Jag is my backup/alternate tunings guitar. The Jazzmaster is more versatile and helps me fill up more space as a 3-piece.

Snufkinoob
07-31-2013, 03:36 PM
Do you remember which guitar was at the little break at 2.18 on "Buffalo Trails"?

deadlands
07-31-2013, 04:30 PM
Do you remember which guitar was at the little break at 2.18 on "Buffalo Trails"?

Yup, the clean guitar is the 69 SG through a Fender Deluxe Reverb RI. Tone is set really bright. The overdriven guitar is the Jag.

Snufkinoob
07-31-2013, 05:53 PM
Ah dammit, I knew it was the SG! Just when I thought I'd stifled my desire to get one. lol

chrismellotron
07-31-2013, 06:06 PM
It makes me glad I got an SG.

tjmicsak
07-31-2013, 09:45 PM
Fender guitar, likely a strat, 60s fuzz, sounds like a maestro to me, reverb, I'm thinking outboard spring.

Vox and Hohner amps would probably have been much easier to find in Italy than Fenders in the mid-60s.

I hear more of a plate reverb.

Rick Towne
07-31-2013, 10:03 PM
Paging James Wilsey or Greg V.

Hector Arcadius
07-31-2013, 10:50 PM
Not typical spaghetti-western tones, but a song heavily inspired by them:



GS5JOAdZH18





UBER-cool thread, btw,folks!

JesterR
08-01-2013, 03:07 AM
I hear more of a plate reverb.

Yes! A lot of guys talk about spring reverb for "spaghetti western" tone. But when I hear big ambient reverb, it's more like a plate reverb, without spring artifacts.