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View Full Version : Where does the volume pedal go?


doomy3
02-17-2006, 11:10 PM
Where does it go in the effects chain? Particularly the EB volume jr. passive volume pedal...Beginning or end? Or does it matter?

D.G.
02-18-2006, 01:34 AM
Passive volume pedals should go after a buffer. This will help with tone-sucking issues. I prefer the volume pedal to be after everything but delays/loopers.

michael.e
02-18-2006, 01:43 AM
I put my Goodrich LDR2 at the front end.

M.E.

GAT
02-18-2006, 01:46 AM
I also put my Goodrich LDR2 first, I think of it as turning down the guitar's volume.

davidkiddmusic
02-18-2006, 01:57 AM
I use mine on the front end as well. I use it as my guitars volume knob just controlable by foot. I use the EB vol Jr. as well.

kp8
02-18-2006, 02:15 AM
in the closet

<wink>

StompBoxBlues
02-18-2006, 02:45 AM
I did a pretty long post about this a little while ago, also if you look at the Ernie Ball review on Harmony Central I went into more detail but generally...

A LOT of reviews start with "it's a volume pedal...duh" which totally misses the mark. It really depends what type volume pedal you have, AND what you want it to do! It also takes some thought to learn to adjust the amp and guitar volume controls, and how they are going to interact with the vol pedal.

If you put it first in the chain, or ahead of OD or Fuzz pedals it will act just like your guitar volume pot. That means if you use it while the OD or fuzz is on, you can control the amount of distortion with the pedal, if the guitar pot is at 10. If you want, you can first set the guitar pot for just the right amount of distortion and then the vol pedal will max out just where you want. OR you can have the guitar at 10, only use the vol pedal for all volume adjustments (and how much dist).

If you place it after boosting pedals like OD and Fuzz, it will act like a "master volume" pedal. This is where I use mine because I like to play with the guitar vol pot, and the vol pedal then is the final control on my overall loudness. I like to set mine so that I always have some more headroom, so I almost never have the vol pedal fully on. What I mean is that I adjust it so about 3/4 or a little more toe down is about normal playing volume. If I need a quick boost I push it down a little more. I've used mine for many years...mostly back in the 70's in front...but in the last few years came to like it more after boost pedals.

Another type of pedal (you can't use one designed for the input in the effects loop) is designed with a different value pot, and designed for "line level" which means you could put it in the efffects loop, and in that instance it really is a master volume control. I hven't tried that, but thought about it a lot...it seems like that could really be good if you play often in different room sizes, etc.

Experiment, there is no wrong place to place it, but try it out right after guitar, turn on your OD and turn the gain up, and just see how you can control how much "grit" how much distortion without really changing much volume-wise...just like a guitar pot. Then move it after distortion and OD, and see. Try it as that last pedal...(depending on what you have in your chain...probably not that great after a delay, though that can be done too...in which case you control even the echos..)

A volume pedal is a great tool. I use mine also during a solo...for instance, a solo that starts out mellow and gains in intensity, you can subtly nudge the volume up as the intensity increases and it really can be nice.

Can violin (volume swell) also. The best and most use I use if for is adjusting my volume with the band, in the mix. If you have a tuner out on you vol pedal, and you have it later on in the chain, remember to turn off OD's etc. before tuning though, since you want a clean signal for that. If your guitar goes out of tune a lot, I would put the vol pedal in front...

They are amazingly versatile and useful tools, and too many folks underrate them.

Dr.Tom
02-18-2006, 10:38 AM
I have Ernie Ball volume pedals as the last pedal in my chain. I use it as a master volume control for my sound. It has solved my problem of either having the right tone , but being too loud or of having the right volume but not the tone I want.
This is also true for one of our other guiatrists. We can finally fine tune tone and volume at the same time with absolute control over both. I wish I had discovered this 20 years ago !! There are many guitarists that don't need it and are able to control volume & tone with the guitar controls. They have my admiration as I'm not that good.

Regards,

Tom

LouRossi
02-18-2006, 11:06 AM
Passive volume pedals should go after a buffer. This will help with tone-sucking issues. I prefer the volume pedal to be after everything but delays/loopers.

+1 this is the way i've always done it too

MarkWorth
02-18-2006, 11:28 AM
i go first...i like to set and forget my guitar, so i don't have any tone changing issues....(i always use both pickups somewhat so it changes the interaction of the two)


i can see some liking it after OD,etc though...

Dickie Fredericks
02-18-2006, 01:23 PM
Mines in the loop. I only use it as a boost for solos. My guitars volume is always on wide open.

doomy3
02-19-2006, 01:37 PM
Thanks for all the help guys! Anybody know about the tuner mute on the EB volume? Does it actually take the tuner out of the chain, or should I put the tuner on one of the loops on my loooper to completely take it out? Only problem is with that is that the tuner would be after my volume, wah, and fuzz face then...

StompBoxBlues
02-19-2006, 01:48 PM
Thanks for all the help guys! Anybody know about the tuner mute on the EB volume? Does it actually take the tuner out of the chain, or should I put the tuner on one of the loops on my loooper to completely take it out? Only problem is with that is that the tuner would be after my volume, wah, and fuzz face then...

My understanding is, no, it does not take the tuner out of the signal path. It is hanging off the end of it and can affect it. That said, I tried hard to hear if my Boss TU-2 is sucking tone and I didn't detect it...seems not to be a problem.

doomy3
02-19-2006, 02:27 PM
My understanding is, no, it does not take the tuner out of the signal path. It is hanging off the end of it and can affect it. That said, I tried hard to hear if my Boss TU-2 is sucking tone and I didn't detect it...seems not to be a problem.

Cool...and it won't be a problem to have it then in front of the fuzz factory then will it? Even though the FF usually does not respond well with buffers in front of it? That will be the volume, wah, and tuner all in front of the FF. What about my compressor? Would that go before or after the Fuzz Factory?

ben_allison
02-20-2006, 11:33 AM
I assumed it would have to take the tuner out of the signal chain, because there is no signal being passed through the tuner, back into the volume pedal.

It's a dead end street. Cord goes out to the tuner, and none goes back in to the volume pedal.

How could it affect your tone it nothing from the tuner is getting routed back into the chain?

ben_allison
02-20-2006, 11:33 AM
I assumed it would have to take the tuner out of the signal chain, because there is no signal being passed through the tuner, back into the volume pedal.

It's a dead end street. Cord goes out to the tuner, and none goes back in to the volume pedal.

How could it affect your tone it nothing from the tuner is getting routed back into the chain?

beej
02-20-2006, 11:45 AM
I use a 25k EB volume pedal in a parallel FX loop in front of my chorus, delay and verb. This way I can fade those effects in and out of my signal without affecting the dry signal.

Really nice to play dry and then fade/out in a thicker sound for certain phrases or solos.

billygoat
02-20-2006, 12:43 PM
Because the tuner out is always on, it is still loading down the signal, since it is not a buffered out.

That's how it's affecting the tone

StompBoxBlues
02-21-2006, 03:06 AM
I assumed it would have to take the tuner out of the signal chain, because there is no signal being passed through the tuner, back into the volume pedal.

It's a dead end street. Cord goes out to the tuner, and none goes back in to the volume pedal.

How could it affect your tone it nothing from the tuner is getting routed back into the chain?

That's because you don't realize what is going on in the signal chain. Not being rude, that is a normal assumption but it is dead wrong.

There is no "dead end street"....if you think about it, there is a + and a - signal going to the tuner, the plus side is the same plus side that is going further on through the other pedals into the amp, the minus side is the "way back" and is the same minus as is also return path for the signal.

It is in parallel...no question about it. You can draw it out for yourself and see. There are TWO main paths to ground, but ground is the same ("ground is ground the whole world round") for both the signal going into the amp and the signal into the tuner.

The reason you think it is a "dead end" is because there is only one cable going into the Tuners' input, and so you think that since nothing is coming out, it is a dead end. Not the case. The cord going into the input has a positive and a negative, (or it wouldn't work) and it coming BACK into the volume pedal buffer. Electricity NEVER flows through a dead end, it isn't useable for anything until there is a return path.

The Tuner is in the signal chain, just as much as if it were connected in series.