PDA

View Full Version : Deluxe Reverb vs. Vibrolux Reverb vs. Super Reverb


trumpus
12-22-2007, 07:54 AM
Can anyone describe (alright, I realize tone is subjective) the differences in tone between these amps? I realize they are different wattages and speaker configurations, but I'm just wondering what your impressions of each amp's sound is, how they are similar and how they differ?

I realize I am opening the floodgates for a lot of subjective, "buzz words" but I'm alight with that - just trying to get a general impression of each amp.

Brian

Bill
12-22-2007, 08:30 AM
I own all three amps and they are great sounding but I would say that the biggest difference in these amps would be volume. I would pick between using these amps depending on the gig volume. For a small club gig with a three piece I usually go with the Deluxe. With a keyboard player or loud drummer and larger gig I would move up to one of the other two with the Super being favored over the Vibrolux.

The Super Reverb is very loud and really too loud for most of the gigs that I do. Lots of headroom and a big sound, though. Great classic loud amp. The Vibrolux is a good step down in volume although still plenty loud for some of us, but also has good headroom. A lot like the SR but a bit less of everything. The Deluxe Reverb has way less volume than the other two amps, little headroom, is pretty aggressive with a loose bottom end but a singing top end. Of the three amps I use the Deluxe far more than the other two because of its less volume.

All of my experience is with original 60s blackface amps. I haven't played around much with later models. My last small gig where people were right on top of me I used the Deluxe and miced it. I did an outdoor gig a while a go and took the Super ( but I should have taken a Marshall). I use the Princeton around the house much of the time. The Princeton is just such a great sounding amp at a 'good around the house' volume. The blackface Fenders I tend to use most are the Princeton Reverb, Deluxe Reverb and the Super Reverb. These three are my favorite Fender blackface amps but the others sound very good as well...

scottlaned
12-22-2007, 08:32 AM
I realize I am opening the floodgates for a lot of subjective, "buzz words"

I would say one is creamy, the other warm, one hifi. You can really get that woman tone with two of them. That great power tube saturation is available on one. Sparkly and jangly. Great tube compression and saturation. Buzz buzz buzz.

62Tele
12-22-2007, 09:08 AM
Honestly, for my ears Fenders all have pretty much the same tone, you just pick the power rating you want to decide at what volume they will break up, and the speaker configuration you like the best. I've owned and played just about every old Fender at one time or another and have to agree with most of what Bill said.

JUST AS A MATTER OF TASTE I prefer the bigger amps in live settings. I have heard DR's sound pretty darned thin and buzzy from across the stage. An old bandmate of mine used to run two blackface DR's and I was running a SR - in practice my amp could be too much, but live it excelled, and we really weren't a loud band at all. For my ears it takes wattage to move the low end frequencies. It's not a function of volume, more fidelity. All this falls by the wayside if you have a really great PA and a sober sound guy who knows what he's doing.

beman
12-22-2007, 09:27 AM
I already had 2 supereverb(1965 & 1967) an a couples of Deluxereverb.
Which amp has the greatest tone?
All depends on the music style you play.
For sure the SR is not a rock amp. It doesn`t take distortion pedal well.

-The SR is a blues amp. Put the volume(not at 2 or 3) at 6 or 7 and you will get a realy good bluesy sound.(I prefer this amp for blues)

-The Deluxe is very good amp too. It takes very well my fulltone driveII.
The rock sound is better with my Deluxe than the SR.
It is easy to carry & i prefer to play with my deluxe in my room.

One of the best bluesy sound:
Put the volume at 6 or 7 on you SR and use a Klon for more gain.
That is my opinion
Good luck.

dorianadams
12-22-2007, 10:49 AM
I already had 2 supereverb(1965 & 1967) an a couples of Deluxereverb.
Which amp has the greatest tone?
All depends on the music style you play.
For sure the SR is not a rock amp. It doesn`t take distortion pedal well.

-The SR is a blues amp. Put the volume(not at 2 or 3) at 6 or 7 and you will get a realy good bluesy sound.(I prefer this amp for blues)

-The Deluxe is very good amp too. It takes very well my fulltone driveII.
The rock sound is better with my Deluxe than the SR.
It is easy to carry & i prefer to play with my deluxe in my room.

One of the best bluesy sound:
Put the volume at 6 or 7 on you SR and use a Klon for more gain.
That is my opinion
Good luck.
A Super Reverb does not take a distortion pedal well? News to me and a lot of others.

Sweet T
12-22-2007, 11:15 AM
I'll say. Mine seems to take distortion pretty well.

sinner
12-22-2007, 01:28 PM
I have owned a Blackface Deluxe and currently have a '66 Vibrolux. Since no one yet has sung of their praises, let me say they rock. Nice cleans, headroom, gets to the good stuff without too much more volume than my Deluxe, not much bigger or heavier to carry.

Cool article from ToneQuest here (Under 40 Watts of Whoop Ass):

http://www.tonequest.com/articles/article2.htm

soldano16
12-22-2007, 02:25 PM
Given that the VR and SR are fairly close in wattage, I'd say the VR is more compressed, the SR has the bigger cleans.

The DR is probably the most versatile of all unless headroom is an issue.

sinner
12-22-2007, 02:33 PM
Smaller transformer in the VR makes it much different than the SR. Complete saturation much earlier than the SR.

Hand of Doom
12-22-2007, 02:37 PM
Good thread, I asked this yesterday with 0 response.

Rowwe11
12-22-2007, 02:45 PM
I dig my SRRI.I must say it takes pedals really well.I just swapped out the rectifier tube for a solid state for more headroom though.

trumpus
12-22-2007, 02:46 PM
I have owned a Blackface Deluxe and currently have a '66 Vibrolux. Since no one yet has sung of their praises, let me say they rock. Nice cleans, headroom, gets to the good stuff without too much more volume than my Deluxe, not much bigger or heavier to carry.

Cool article from ToneQuest here (Under 40 Watts of Whoop Ass):

http://www.tonequest.com/articles/article2.htm

Great article indeed - one of the things that prompted me to get my VR!

Given that the VR and SR are fairly close in wattage, I'd say the VR is more compressed, the SR has the bigger cleans.

I think this is what I'm finding with my VR - granted, mine needs some general maintenance and some TLC before it is in tip top shape, but it is breaking up a bit earlier than I expected from 40W of tube.

Smaller transformer in the VR makes it much different than the SR. Complete saturation much earlier than the SR.

Again - in line with what I am finding. I went back and forth between a VR and an SR, and decided on the VR because I felt it would be more manageable, which it is, I guess I still have the SR in the back of my mind! Someday!

Unburst
12-22-2007, 04:35 PM
Given a choice I'd always go for the bigger iron.

That means Super Reverb.

Bill
12-22-2007, 04:54 PM
Given a choice I'd always go for the bigger iron.

That means Super Reverb.


I would definitely agree except that sometimes the occassion calls for something smaller. Too much amp is as bad as not enough amp. I need to use the amp that fits the situation and there does not exist just one amp that will do that for me.

Redhouse-Blues
12-22-2007, 06:10 PM
I have owned a Blackface Deluxe and currently have a '66 Vibrolux. Since no one yet has sung of their praises, let me say they rock. Nice cleans, headroom, gets to the good stuff without too much more volume than my Deluxe, not much bigger or heavier to carry.

Cool article from ToneQuest here (Under 40 Watts of Whoop Ass):

http://www.tonequest.com/articles/article2.htm

I just read that and I wish he said what speaker he suggest in the Deluxe. I like Vintage 30's in my Twin and wonder what one would do in the Deluxe?

My first choice would be the Deluxe, because it's a great amp and you can very easy gig with it, record with it and use it around the house. The Super is bad ass amp when cranked past 6, it's all Blues, just listen to Ronnie Earl. But for smaller gig's and around the house it's to much, it really needs to be cranked to do it's thing. Both take pedals very well. You can't go wrong with any of them, like others have said, it depends on your needs.

Robal
12-22-2007, 06:21 PM
I have a 1965 Super Reverb and a 1972 Deluxe Reverb. I played out with the Super Reverb and used an attenuator (2 ohm Hotplate) to drop the volume in clubs, and a Klon to fatten up the mids a bit. I never used the Deluxe Reverb to play out because the amount of clean headroom I needed was not sufficient to keep up with the drummer, bass player and lead guitarist (using a vintage 50 watt Marshall). The Deluxe Reverb just sounded so much smaller than the SR and the bass craps out pretty quicly. You can mike the DR, of course, but I needed more stage volume to blend well with the other guys; it was an pop rock band.

For recording, the Deluxe Reverb with good 6V6 tubes is a sweet, warm sounding amp.

otaypanky
12-22-2007, 06:35 PM
I have a '67 Super, a recent Custom Vibrolux Reverb and a DRRI. I disagree with what a lot of folks think about a Super being too loud for home use. On my old 67, if I roll the tone controls down to zero, the amp goes quiet, no sound at all. Raise the volume control to 6 or better, then gently start with the bass control. You'll get to 2 -2 12 and the amp goes 'ooofff' and comes to life. Then just bring up the mid and treb a tad to taste, maybe 3 1/2 or so, and you have a great sound at a lower volume level. The second input is greatly overlooked and very effective in getting a lower overall volume level without sacrificing the tone. Experimentation can let you discover different ways of getting great sounds out of an amp you didn't think were in there.Years ago I bought a DRRI and could never bond with it. It ended up living in the closet and I never understood what the fuss was all about. So I sold it. Maybe because I let my '65 go when I was a kid, a dumb kid, I have always wished I could find one I liked. I played through one at my local jam this week and hated the treble spike that pierced my head. But surprisingly, today I found a new one at my local music store and it sounded so good I gave it a home. Played it about two hours tonight and love it.
The CVR is looking for a new home. It sounds great to me somedays, and other days I can't seem to get a good sound out of it. It's portable enough, as is the DRRI, much more so than a Super for sure.

KCWM
12-22-2007, 08:42 PM
Recently, I went through an amp buying experience (I've taken everything back, but that's a different story) and I tried both the DRRI and the Vibrolux. The DRRI had a brighter, trebly sound to it. Not in a bad way, but in a way that compliments the sound of a strat very well. The Vibrolux had a very warm sound...bassy and booming. The treble was still there as well, but not at the same level as the DRRI. The Vibrolux was much louder than the DRRI and has a tone to match.

If I have my choice of those two amps, I'd pick the Vibrolux. If I get the right deal on a DRRI after I sell my guitars, I'd be happy with it.

Bill
12-22-2007, 08:46 PM
I have a 1965 Super Reverb and a 1972 Deluxe Reverb. I played out with the Super Reverb and used an attenuator (2 ohm Hotplate) to drop the volume in clubs, and a Klon to fatten up the mids a bit. I never used the Deluxe Reverb to play out because the amount of clean headroom I needed was not sufficient to keep up with the drummer, bass player and lead guitarist (using a vintage 50 watt Marshall). The Deluxe Reverb just sounded so much smaller than the SR and the bass craps out pretty quicly. You can mike the DR, of course, but I needed more stage volume to blend well with the other guys; it was an pop rock band.

For recording, the Deluxe Reverb with good 6V6 tubes is a sweet, warm sounding amp.

Using a DR along with a 50 watt Marshall would make for a long night of being completely out gunned. The DR would sound totally weak and thin by comparison. The last time I had another guitar player in the band we always used amps of the same size. At times we both used Super Reverbs but eventually just used two Deluxe Reverbs or sometimes an AC15 which is the same volume as a DR. Once we recorded and the other guy used a SR and I used a tweed Super and even on the live recording the SR sounded so much bigger. I knew he was louder than me but I thought that on tape it wouldn't make any difference, but it did. His sound is great on the tape and mine is small by comparison.

62Tele
12-23-2007, 01:23 AM
Mudslide,
I used a VR for several years as my only amp. GREAT amp, but I liked it a lot better with a 12 and a 10 as opposed to two 10's.

Bill,
I think a lot of players would be surprised how their rig sounds across a crowded bar. Standing back and listening to what really gets out there is a lot like you describe with your recording experience. Holds true at low volumes too - there is a guy in Albuquerque who used to do a solo act with an archtop and a Super Reverb and sounded great. He tried a smaller amp a few times and his sound thinned right out. I've gotten to the point where I want at least 50 watts, and 10's only if there are four of 'em, otherwise 12's.

FFTT
12-23-2007, 02:10 AM
The right choice of speakers is critical to the way these amps sound overall.

Fender is not going to outfit their amps with high end $250.00 speakers, simply to keep their prices competitive.

For limited use, you can also have a DR re-biased for 6L6's for greater headroom, even for vintage collectables without any other alterations.

My neighbor has his '64 DR outfitted with NOS 6L6's, all NOS pre-amp tubes
and an original British Vintage 30.

That amp is magical!

He still has the original speaker and original 6V6's so there's no problem
at all if he decides to take it back to stock.

Bill
12-23-2007, 02:31 PM
Mudslide,
I used a VR for several years as my only amp. GREAT amp, but I liked it a lot better with a 12 and a 10 as opposed to two 10's.

Bill,
I think a lot of players would be surprised how their rig sounds across a crowded bar. Standing back and listening to what really gets out there is a lot like you describe with your recording experience. Holds true at low volumes too - there is a guy in Albuquerque who used to do a solo act with an archtop and a Super Reverb and sounded great. He tried a smaller amp a few times and his sound thinned right out. I've gotten to the point where I want at least 50 watts, and 10's only if there are four of 'em, otherwise 12's.

JGM, I couldn't agree with your first sentence more.

I also like the big amps but I tend to play a lot of places where the audience is right on top of you so sizing the amp to the gig just makes sense. One size fits all is no more appropriate in a band situation than anywhere else. One night one of the DRs went down so we brought in a Super Reverb from the truck and immediately I had people coming up to me telling me that the other guitar player was just too loud. I had a friend sit in on my rig and I went to the back of the room to listen. I could see what my friends were telling me. The SR was just beaming, throwing out that hard clean tone that it has on low volume while the DR sounded perfect. Now, had we been playing at a higher volume the SR would have buried the DR but in this case the DR was the much better sounding and appropriate amp. It really pays to size the amp to the situation.

Another thing to consider is that I don't use pedals. The other guitar player does, but I don't. I can just never get them to improve my tone they just always affect it in a negative way, for me. I have always hated the sound of a big amp on low volume, attenuated, and using pedals excessively to try and achieve good tone. I see lots of players doing it but it is not the guitar sound for me. The size of the amp depends on the gig, the player, the music, how many players, etc. I like the big boys best but I want to put on the best show I can so I use an amp that will the best fit. Just my two cents...I can tell from your posts that you know what you are doing...

otaypanky
12-23-2007, 02:43 PM
I just tried a Jensen Neo in a new DRRI to experiment and it sounded great to my ears. You got all the character from the amp and it sounded wonderful both at high and low volumes. It seemed to stay a little tighter on the low notes. I have it in a Richter and left it in the Richter cabinet, just plugged the speaker lead into the Fender chassis.

Unburst
12-23-2007, 03:46 PM
I would definitely agree except that sometimes the occassion calls for something smaller. Too much amp is as bad as not enough amp. I need to use the amp that fits the situation and there does not exist just one amp that will do that for me.


You can always use an attenuator with a big amp, afaik there is no device to make a small amp sound bigger.

trumpus
12-23-2007, 05:00 PM
You can always use an attenuator with a big amp, afaik there is no device to make a small amp sound bigger.

Never used one, but isn't that what the Sound Enhancer is supposed to do?

http://http://www.soundenhancer.com/Images/Amp_and_Enhancer_01.jpg

http://http://www.soundenhancer.com/Images/Twin_and_Enhancer_sm.jpg

Bill
12-23-2007, 05:41 PM
You can always use an attenuator with a big amp, afaik there is no device to make a small amp sound bigger.

Well, let me be the first to let you know of a device that makes a small amp sound bigger. As a matter of fact this device can make a small amp sound as big as any amp that is out there...it is called a PA system. I bet you agree with me. ;-)

I am surprised anyone uses an attenuator. Every attenuator I have heard just ruins the sound of the amp. I can think of no tone killing device that is its equal. IMHO there is never a time to use an attenuator with a guitar amp.

squeally dan
12-23-2007, 07:42 PM
I played a huge venue last night for a corporate Christmas party. I used my 73 deluxe which is running 6L6's. I mainly use a clean sound. I turn the deluxe up to 4 and its getting close to break up. I just let the pa and monitors do the rest. The sound man likes it better than my twin or my Mesa LSC.

hunter
12-23-2007, 08:00 PM
Here is a solo excerpt from a studio recording I did a long time ago using my trusty BF Super Reverb.

http://soundclick.com/share?songid=6101242

Turned up loud and it was starting to sing pretty good. A cranked up Super Reverb is one of Fenders best creations. Unfortunately the opportunities to play it that loud are few.

I also have a Vibrolux Reverb and a Deluxe Reverb. Up to a certain volume the VR and SR sound similar. Then the VR will start to get a little too loose. The SR's 4-10s stay tight at higher volumes and can really let the amp roll. The Deluxe Reverb is quite a bit looser and prone to letting go but is still a sweet amp.

FWIW the Deluxe Reverb gets out of the house way more than either the VR or SR cause they are loud and the SR is way big. If I can turn it up enough, when it comes to sound, the Super Reverb is still my favorite Fender amp.

hunter

Rocknrollampsinc
12-23-2007, 08:08 PM
Those Fender circuits are all almost identical. The amplifiers themselves if played through the same speaker/cabinet combination would probably all sound very similar within limits. As one of the posters said before, it's just a power and clean headroom thing.
Regards

PSaulino
12-23-2007, 08:15 PM
As much as I love the idea of a Deluxe Reverb, I never was able to gig with one with the drummers I've played with. Great tone to about 6 on the dial, 7,8 you start to lose definition ... and they're kinda thin in a band situation. Pedal or no pedal, same result.

Vibrolux has more of something... it just sounds better. A Super is huge, 80 pound beast. Most definitely need pedals with it, but massive tone and punch. Too much to haul conveniently though.

A KILLER compromise is a Princeton Reverb II w/pedals. Same power rating as a Deluxe, size of a Princeton (little larger cab) ..but just more punch and fatness - one of the best kept secrets out there. Keeps up wth the aforementioned drummer(s)!

Paul

E Baxter Put
12-23-2007, 08:36 PM
Yeah... those classic Fender circuits definitely sound very similar to me. I use a deluxe sometimes, but on the loud rock gigs I use a Twin.

I think the vibrolux and super sound more similar than the deluxe, probably because of the 10" speakers. They are super tight sounding.

I have also changed out my deluxe reverb speaker to a Cannabis Rex and it seems to be a bit louder and the bass doesn't get flabby at high volumes. The original oxford speaker in the deluxe didn't like being above 4 on the volume.

atomicmassunit
12-23-2007, 09:20 PM
I too have all 3 of these amps. All blackface '65s or '66s, old ones.

My Deluxe Reverb is my best sounding amp. It is just magic, touch sensitive, beautiful. Most people who try it want to buy it. It has been through the years my consistent #1 amp, perfect for most of the gigs I do. For one gig, outdoors (in the freezing cold) my marshall went down and the only other amp I had around was the DR, and I used it on 10 and it just could not hang. Club gigs it is the best.

Vibrolux Reverb. I sold one this summer to fund another PRS, and immediately had to buy another one I missed it so much. It is a little harder sounding than the DR, but it's a beautiful amp. I haven't used it on enough gigs to really find the sweet spot on this particular one.

Super Reverb. I have the world's most perfect condition one. It doesn't have a single nick, scratch, or rust spot on it, inside and out. It's a '66 and just STUPID clean looking. Original cover and footswitch. It doesn't like pedals as much as the DR, but every time I use it at a gig my drummer goes nuts, he loves the sound of it. I on the other hand find that I can't get it loud enough to sing at the gigs I do. I'm always fighting it when I bring it to gigs because it's so damn loud and I have to just neuter it by keeping the vol down. Makes me wanna book an outdoor gig because I know what it's capable of.

Bill
12-23-2007, 09:44 PM
I believe I agree with everything you guys have said since my last post. My experience with these blackface amps is the same as yours. My Super Reverb gets the least use but in the perfect situation it is a killer sounding amp. I hope a bigger gig is somewhere on the horizon. I would love to break it out and give it some exercise.

Unburst
12-23-2007, 10:43 PM
Well, let me be the first to let you know of a device that makes a small amp sound bigger. As a matter of fact this device can make a small amp sound as big as any amp that is out there...it is called a PA system. I bet you agree with me. ;-)


A PA will make a small amp louder, it will not make it bigger.

2x6L6
12-24-2007, 12:23 AM
Cool thread, and it is interesting how subjective these things are. No experience with a SR, but I do have both a SF Deluxe and Vibrolux - the VR has been my gigging amp for a long, long time (but has just been knocked off its pedestal by my Heritage Colonial (but I still LOVE my Vibrolux and always will)).

Both mine are "blackfaced" and tuned up to sound their best (IMO). Weber 12A150 in the Deluxe, Emi Rajun Cajun and Legend 1058 in the VR.

To my ears, the VR is way warmer, and more the sound of rock. I swear my Deluxe is louder, or as loud, but also harder and not as friendly in the high end (ouch!) as the VR (yes, I've neutered the bright cap). My VR is friendly across the spectrum, breaks up nicely and is not as ear-fatigung as the DR. To be sure, the DR breaks up early and heartily, especially with the Alnico speaker - so it can rock, but the VR sounds bigger and fatter to me. The Deluxe tends to be pickier about which pedals it likes and which it loves - not so, the VR.

They're both great amps - I do dig my Deluxe and plan to own it 'til death do us part, but I'd always grab the Vibrolux first as it doesn't weigh much more, sounds better to me, takes pedals better and has the right amount of headroom, though I wouldn't accuse either of being particularly "clean" amps. Above 3 on the volume they are both breaking up some.

YMMV!

sheikyerbouti
09-02-2008, 09:38 AM
Would a pro reverb be the same deal? Similar sound, different wattage?

traviswalk
09-02-2008, 01:08 PM
Any thoughts on the Pro Reverb?

stratzrus
09-03-2008, 02:01 PM
Honestly, for my ears Fenders all have pretty much the same tone, you just pick the power rating you want to decide at what volume they will break up, and the speaker configuration you like the best. Yet the breakup of the DR, VR and SR sound completely different...go figure!

I have all three amps and don't see them as being the same at all. Certainly the clean tones come from the same lineage, but they occur at different volumes and the nature of the break up when overdriven has significant differences. As a result, I don't think of them as being cookie cutter substitutes for one another based soley on volume.

For sure the SR is not a rock amp. It doesn`t take distortion pedal well...One of the best bluesy sound: Put the volume at 6 or 7 on you SR and use a Klon for more gain. I guess this is a matter of opinion and dependant on which pedals you use, but you seem to imply that it at least pairs well with the Klon.

My Super Reverb loves my Mesa V-Twin pedal, the Keely TS9, and absolutely adores the Zendrive...I don't know which pedals (or guitars) you tried with it.
I never used the Deluxe Reverb to play out because the amount of clean headroom I needed was not sufficient to keep up with the drummer, bass player and lead guitarist (using a vintage 50 watt Marshall). The Deluxe Reverb just sounded so much smaller than the SR and the bass craps out pretty quicly. You can mike the DR, of course, but I needed more stage volume to blend well with the other guys.This reflects much of my experience as well.
Well, let me be the first to let you know of a device that makes a small amp sound bigger. As a matter of fact this device can make a small amp sound as big as any amp that is out there...it is called a PA system.A PA will make a small amp louder, it will not make it bigger.Agreed.

Some may feel that there is no difference, but to me the difference is significant. I saw Vernon Reid sit in with Rollins Band during the '90s in a theater sized hall, they all had full or half stacks and he just had a Tremoverb that was miked through the PA. I was close enough to the stage (front and center) that I could hear both the sound of the amp and the reinforced sound.

When he played his intro solo it sounded fine, but when the rest of the band kicked in his sound got lost. You could still hear it but the notes were not distinct and had no "weight" (no pun intended).
I have...changed out my deluxe reverb speaker to a Cannabis Rex and it seems to be a bit louder and the bass doesn't get flabby at high volumes. The original oxford speaker in the deluxe didn't like being above 4 on the volume.I have a TT alnico in mine and like your experience, the bottom end tightened up significantly and overall volume increased to the point where it was usable in situations where it would have been overwhelmed before.

All three amps are great but I don't think of them simply as loud, louder, loudest. My decision to use one over the other would be based as much in the type of music being played as the volume required.

ozspawn
09-03-2008, 10:38 PM
I have a '66 DR, a '69 blackfaced PR, a '70 blackfaced VR, and a '72 blackfaced SR. All of them have NOS tubes and after-market speakers, except the SR, which has the original reconed CTS Alnicos.

These amps do not sound similar to each other. It's not just a matter of headroom or volume; they have different characters. I am going to make some generalizations, but here goes.

The PR is a tramp: a little dirty, a little sweet, with a ragged edge.

The DR is regal: warm, fat, round and spanky - in the best possible way.

The VR is angelic: warm, lyrical and sweet.

The SR is killer: hard, cold and bombastic.

The one thing they do share is a bright, shimmering top end.

Each amp is amazing in it's own element. I wouldn't say one is better than another; their value is situationally specific.

However, from most to least versatile, they go: DR, VR, PR and SR.

I judge the SR least versatile because although it has a kick like a mule at all volumes, it doesn't begin to sing like the others until it is very, very loud. Personally, I rarely need to play that loud (also, I am going deaf from playing all these years so I tend to be a little more careful now).

Miss congeniality has to go to the DR. This amp will let you do anything, as long as you're not too loud.

chrisgraff
09-04-2008, 05:27 AM
A Super Reverb does not take a distortion pedal well? News to me and a lot of others.

I agree...supers get mushy with a distortion pedal. There's a point where those 10" speakers just can't hang.

Groovey Records
09-04-2008, 05:59 AM
Any thoughts on the Pro Reverb?

I think I miss mine very Much:o

soldersucker
09-04-2008, 06:48 AM
I have three of each pretty much same Leo curcuit just different iron/speaker configurations.Most practicle? Deluxe.Tone that will make you believe in a god? Super reverb + nice strat.:phones

stratzrus
09-04-2008, 07:21 AM
I agree...supers get mushy with a distortion pedal. There's a point where those 10" speakers just can't hang.True, but at that point you'd probably need a half stack, not one of the smaller Fender combos.

traviswalk
09-04-2008, 07:47 AM
I think I miss mine very Much:o

Ha! Thanks again Joe, didn't have a chance to put it through the gears last night but should have some time with it on Saturday! Was just curious how others ranked the PR in relation to the others that were discussed in the thread.

GenoBluzGtr
09-14-2008, 07:18 AM
You can always use an attenuator with a big amp, afaik there is no device to make a small amp sound bigger.


You could use extension cabs and mic to the PA if your amp isn't quite enough for a gig.

MaxBoogie
09-14-2008, 08:22 AM
For those that have both a VR and a PR, what about the similarities of those two? In theory, the circuits are almost identical so the biggest factor "should" be a pair of 10" speakers vs. a pair of 12" speakers??

Rick51
09-14-2008, 09:32 AM
Any thoughts on the Pro Reverb?

It's another AB763 circuit, great amp. Like a low power Twin.

ozspawn
09-14-2008, 09:32 AM
I thought the PR and the SR had similar circuits, but one has 4 10's and the other has two 12's.

pula58
09-17-2008, 01:46 PM
The PR has a completely different phase inverter than the DR, VR, SR and other AB763 amplifiers. So, it's circuit is significantly different.

The other AB763 circuits have what look like the same circuit, but due to different power supply filtering and power supply transformers they have different plate voltages, and this greatly affects the tone and how soon or late the amp goes into break-up. The output transformers are obviously different in all the amps to, but the power supply, in my opinion, is a big factor too!

just my two cents

Gris
10-28-2008, 01:05 PM
Princeton = great overdrive at moderate volume
Deluxe = less great overdrive at slightly less moderate volume
Lux = slightly more volume and headroom, plus more compression than Deluxe
Super = much tighter bass, more headroom less compression/overdrive than any of the above

ps - you left out the BF Bandmaster and Bassman

♪♪♫♫♪
10-28-2008, 01:57 PM
not to hijack but...

what are the corresponding heads to those amps? I think the Dual Showman is a Twin, but do the others have corresponding heads?

Kelsey
10-28-2008, 02:59 PM
I think you're right about the Showman/Twin link. The Tremolux head is the same as a non-reverb Vibrolux, but I don't know about other pairings.

fish78
10-28-2008, 05:45 PM
I am curious why no mention of the Vibroverb...either in 2-10 or 1-15 configuraation...the ones I have heard offer some pretty damn good tones and seem to hang with a band pretty good.

CitizenCain
10-28-2008, 06:28 PM
The PR has a completely different phase inverter than the DR, VR, SR and other AB763 amplifiers. So, it's circuit is significantly different.

I think the PR being referred to in this instance is the Pro Reverb :D

yvescorm
09-28-2013, 03:27 PM
Hey all! Reviving this thread...

I'd like to chime in here. I just found a 1974 silverface Vibrolux Reverb in great shape maybe a month ago.

I play in a CCR tribute band, and need great cleans. Thought this 45(ish) W Fender amp would be perfect! I knew I wasn't gonna get "cleans for days" but was sure I'd have enough.

I've played a couple of gigs with it, and today at sound check, decided that I has gonna fall back to my backup amp! The Vibrolux just got distorted to early, and couldn't hang with the band with the cleans.

I'm gonna have to look into fiddling with tube configurations and/or speaker replacements.

I'm real disappointed about having to swap it out and hope I'll be able to get it "gig ready" soon.

JDW3
09-28-2013, 04:14 PM
Hey all! Reviving this thread...

I'd like to chime in here. I just found a 1974 silverface Vibrolux Reverb in great shape maybe a month ago.

I play in a CCR tribute band, and need great cleans. Thought this 45(ish) W Fender amp would be perfect! I knew I wasn't gonna get "cleans for days" but was sure I'd have enough.

I've played a couple of gigs with it, and today at sound check, decided that I has gonna fall back to my backup amp! The Vibrolux just got distorted to early, and couldn't hang with the band with the cleans.

I'm gonna have to look into fiddling with tube configurations and/or speaker replacements.

I'm real disappointed about having to swap it out and hope I'll be able to get it "gig ready" soon.

Can't you just mic it at a lower volume? That's a 40w amp.

yvescorm
09-28-2013, 04:53 PM
Can't you just mic it at a lower volume? That's a 40w amp.

I could, but we do a lot of smaller club shows that we don't mic the amps/drums. So amps are loud enough to hang with drums, and then we get vocals to hang with the amps and that's it. But that is beside the point...

I figured that the 40W Vibrolux had enough headroom to be clean at gig/drum volumes. I start distorting between 5-6 with humbuckers (a little later with singles). And the volume isn't "stupid loud" like most Fenders (like a deluxe on the clean channel).

AXXA
09-29-2013, 01:23 AM
Hey all! Reviving this thread...

I'd like to chime in here. I just found a 1974 silverface Vibrolux Reverb in great shape maybe a month ago.

I play in a CCR tribute band, and need great cleans. Thought this 45(ish) W Fender amp would be perfect! I knew I wasn't gonna get "cleans for days" but was sure I'd have enough.

I've played a couple of gigs with it, and today at sound check, decided that I has gonna fall back to my backup amp! The Vibrolux just got distorted to early, and couldn't hang with the band with the cleans.

I'm gonna have to look into fiddling with tube configurations and/or speaker replacements.

I'm real disappointed about having to swap it out and hope I'll be able to get it "gig ready" soon.

This is similar to my experience. I found what I wanted with a Twin.

The Vibrolux is great at what it does, but it was not clean enough or bright enough for the surfy sounds I like. Mine started breaking up shortly after the volume passed 3, which was cool for some things of course. The sound was too warm for my tastes. I'm glad I went with a more powerful amp, instead of changing speakers and tubes, etc. YMMV of course, perhaps a more efficient speaker would be enough for you.

I think a Deluxe would be fun to have for more cranked Fender tones. They really do all seem to have their own distinctive character!

vanderkalin
09-29-2013, 08:00 AM
I would say one is creamy, the other warm, one hifi. You can really get that woman tone with two of them. That great power tube saturation is available on one. Sparkly and jangly. Great tube compression and saturation. Buzz buzz buzz.

Don't forget the Super has haunting mids:)

don carney
09-29-2013, 08:26 AM
Why not use a plastic shield/screen with the Super Reverb to deal with the volume issue?

the_Chris
08-24-2014, 09:41 AM
On my Vibrolux (a '71 SF), I replaced the power transformer to an Allen Amps TO40MT. The transformer upgrade made the low end tighter and gave me a bit more punch and volume. It was well worth the upgrade. I like my Super Reverb a lot too, but the Vibrolux is really my sound. FWIW, the Super Reverb can work great at lower volumes and certainly gets much louder than my Vibrolux. With that said, I've been tempted to sell the SR and get a blackface VR.

fuzzface71
10-16-2014, 08:07 AM
Sorry, to bump this excellent old thread. :)

stratzrus
10-16-2014, 10:39 AM
I have all three. One can make generalizations about the differences but the speakers you have in them can make all the difference in the world.

I'd say the Deluxe Reverb and Super Reverb are pretty much what you'd expect (SR has more headroom). I have a Tone Tubby Alnico in the DR and unmarked Eminence speakers in the SR (its what came in it, I bought EVMs to put in it but never did due to the weight). The TTs give the DR a tighter bottom end, more headroom, and a sweeter top end. The Eminence speakers are pretty clean (no apparent speaker distortion) and seem to be efficient and relatively flat.

The Vibrolux Reverb was the surprise to me. It broke up a lot earlier than I expected...later found out it was due to the smaller transformer. I have TT alnico's in it too and it's great for Jazz and Blues, but it really doesn't have enough headroom for Funk and R&B gigs in medium to large venues with no sound reinforcement.

I play mostly clean so I spend much more time on the Super Reverb than the VR and if it's late in my apartment I play the DR. I really like the VR but of the three it's the one that gets the least playing time.

dwoverdrive
10-16-2014, 10:53 AM
This has always confused me about Fender amps. They just seem to have had so many models that are really close to each other in terms of sound but with a few different features like Trem or reverb. It really is all about volume and headroom.
Another thing that gets overlooked is that these amps were made during a time when bands would match backlines to make it look really sharp. They go together and form a "collection" that let you customize a backline and soundscape that kind of defined that era.

Echoes
10-16-2014, 12:41 PM
The Super Reverb sounds great! even for low volume small gigs (if you don't mind dragging that huge heavy amp around) it delivers everything Fender amps are known for. I prefer the blackface circuit myself, but the silverface amps sound great too! just personal preference..