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Peacekeeper
12-30-2007, 07:54 PM
which of those two guitars is a better buy? I dont shred...I ususally play prog.rock (early 70s, late 60s), classic rock, and jazz/blues.

so which would be better?
:BEER

Peacekeeper
12-30-2007, 08:07 PM
so Jazzmaster is better?
I guess J.M has a fatter tone, right?

uvacom
12-30-2007, 08:13 PM
It really just depends on what you want. There are a number of more subtle differences, but basically the jaguar has a more percussive, somewhat jangly sound, whereas the jazzmaster is a somewhat more mellow-sounding guitar, I wouldn't necessarily say fatter. They both have a really characteristic (and somewhat difficult to set up) bridge/tailpiece.

Flyin' Brian
12-30-2007, 08:21 PM
A buzz stop is a necessary addition to either.

http://www.northcoastmusic.com/buzzstop/

Crazyquilt
12-30-2007, 10:24 PM
Neither's better. They're just different. I, personally, prefer JMs, and find them far more versatile than Jags -- but, then, when I played a real '68 Jag, it sounded nothing like a modern versions I'd played. I still kick myself for not buying it, consequences be damned.

Some people find a buzz stop necessary. Other don't. I've not needed one.

Both guitars are persnickety & somewhat of a PITA to set up. However, once you get the guitar settled (and once you get your head around the uniqueness that is the offset experience) the trem is extremely stable, smooth & musical.

wonderboy
12-30-2007, 10:28 PM
I think you need one of each! (Not a joke!)
I wouldn't say anyone of them is the ultimate bluesguitar, though. But you should defenitly get both, you won't regret it! :)

8Painting
12-31-2007, 08:21 AM
Aesthetically I always loved both, kind of leaned toward the Jazz, but, I played one and the scale length of the neck really hindered my playing.

I ended up buying the Jag, and haven't looked back, the neck is great.

I can see why all their quirks made them unpopular back in the day, but I got over it, added a buzzstop, and its awesome.

I've been meaning to start a thread on how much I love my new jag, but havent gotten around to getting pics that give it justice.


Long story short. The choice of necks really is what comes down to it, I think.

John Phillips
12-31-2007, 09:23 AM
Which is the better buy... it depends.

They're about the same price new, but the Jazzmaster has a slightly higher resale value used.

They're totally different guitars, despite looking almost identical in some ways - the critical difference is the scale length. The Jag's short 24" scale can be a bit cramped for some people, and gives it a percussive, biting but also thick tone - hard to describe, and more 'different' than the Jazzmaster. The Jazzmaster has a normal fender 25.5" scale and a smoother, fuller, more 'normal' tone with a bit more sustain.

The Buzz-stop is NOT necessary for either if they're set up properly with heavier strings (minimum 10s on a Jazzmaster, 11s on a Jag), but probably is if you want to use lighter ones.

Also contrary to popular myth they stay in tune very well if set up right - I used an original '65 Jaguar as my main gigging guitar for about five years and it's one of the most tuning-stable guitars I've had.

The pickups are different too - the Jaguar is slightly more varied tonally, but less versatile in the sense of being usable for different styles. It's a great pop/alt/grunge guitar, but less useful for more classic blues/country/rock, which the Jazzmaster is better for (as well as good for the others!). The Jaguar sounds best either strictly clean or very heavily fuzz/distorted, whereas the Jazzmaster is more suited to dirty-clean and in-between light overdrive. (IMO)

So probably overall the Jazzmaster is the more useful guitar... but personally I prefer the Jaguar.

I hope that makes sense :).

Peacekeeper
12-31-2007, 12:04 PM
thanks for the insight guys.:)

BBHollowbody
12-31-2007, 12:14 PM
A buzz stop is a necessary addition to either.

http://www.northcoastmusic.com/buzzstop/


nah, I play my JM without a buzzstop and I don't have any problems.
those things kill the all the great overtones you get from the standard JM setup.

haslar
12-31-2007, 04:28 PM
I totally agree with John Phillips' post.
Except for the conclusion: I prefer the JM.
:BEER


BTW I used to own a '60 Jazzmaster, and it stayed in tune incredibly well, no matter how hard I used the trem arm.
I used 10s on that one, sometimes 11s.

AaeCee
12-31-2007, 05:45 PM
I totally agree with John Phillips' post.
Except for the conclusion: I prefer the JM.
:BEER


BTW I used to own a '60 Jazzmaster, and it stayed in tune incredibly well, no matter how hard I used the trem arm.
I used 10s on that one, sometimes 11s.And with his conclusion, I totally agree with haslar's post.

tim gueguen
12-31-2007, 09:40 PM
If you want to hear the Jazzmaster in action in a context close to yours check out some of Nels Cline's stuff. He's also used a Jag at times as well.

The Golden Boy
12-31-2007, 11:05 PM
I had a 64 Jag and a 65 Jazzmaster.

I don't miss either of them.



If I were to choose between the two- I'd take the Jazzmaster, solely because of the switching.

jasonwalston
12-31-2007, 11:52 PM
....or Television. Nels is God.

alvagoldbook
01-01-2008, 05:10 PM
being a lover of the "other" guitars Fender made, I would say the Jazzmaster is my favorite. I like them a lot more than the Jaguar, but I would say the Jaguar looks a little prettier with the controls.

the jazzmaster, and the jaguar use a two way button selector switch (on the left upper horn). Both also have "roller wheels" that are used to adjust the volume and tone for the rhythm pickup.

as far as I know, there's no way to activate both pickups on either a jazz or a jag.

the les paul - like toggle on the jazzmaster is used to get different tones from the lead pickup, much like a 3 way toggle does for the single pickup broadcaster. the jaguar has 3 switches instead, which, I don't remember what they do, but I think two of them work as "on-off" switches for each pickup.

the jag has a 24 scale. the jazz has a 25.5 scale. the jag pups are quite thin, from the ones I've played (mostly jap reissues) the jag pups are thinner than strat or even tele pups. jazz master pups don't sound fatter or as fat as a P-90, but basically sounds like a decent quality overwound single coil.

I also recommend a buzz stop. It seems to help the over all tension and string response, and seems to help tuning a bit. It also keeps the strings pulled down lower behind the bridge. Sometimes I've had issues with the low E string popping out of the bridge saddle. the buzz stop fixed this. the best thing about it is that you don't need to alter the guitar at all, it just works with the screw holes that are already there.

Crazyquilt
01-01-2008, 05:53 PM
as far as I know, there's no way to activate both pickups on either a jazz or a jag.

the les paul - like toggle on the jazzmaster is used to get different tones from the lead pickup, much like a 3 way toggle does for the single pickup broadcaster. the jaguar has 3 switches instead, which, I don't remember what they do, but I think two of them work as "on-off" switches for each pickup.

I'm sorry, but this is all factually incorrect. The Jazzmaster's rhythm circuit only utilizes the neck pickup, but the lead circuit's 3-way switch operates exactly as you'd expect: neck - neck+bridge - bridge. On a Jag, you just switch both pickups on (with or without the strangle switch, as you prefer.)

the jag pups are quite thin, from the ones I've played (mostly jap reissues) the jag pups are thinner than strat or even tele pups. jazz master pups don't sound fatter or as fat as a P-90, but basically sounds like a decent quality overwound single coil.You can't judge the sound of an offset purely on its CIJ incarnations -- especially a JM (which has a strat pickup in a wide cover, for all practical purposes.) I don't feel that the JM pickup sounds like a 'regular' overwound single-coil, but nor does it sound like a P-90. It sounds like a Jazzmaster. It has plenty of top end (unlike most overwound pups) but the wide, flat coils give it a fatter sound.

I also recommend a buzz stop. It seems to help the over all tension and string response, and seems to help tuning a bit. It also keeps the strings pulled down lower behind the bridge. Sometimes I've had issues with the low E string popping out of the bridge saddle. the buzz stop fixed this. the best thing about it is that you don't need to alter the guitar at all, it just works with the screw holes that are already there.

As has been stated repeatedly, many people feel a buzzstop necessary, but by no means all (or even most.) Set up an offset properly and use heavy enough strings and there is no need for it unless you are a tremendously heavy-handed player.

Sorry to sound like I'm coming down hard on you; it's clear you're trying to assist, but some of your statements are factually incorrect, which winds up helping no one. A quick look at an offset schematic or Fender's control layout guide will show you what's what.

John Phillips
01-01-2008, 06:12 PM
as far as I know, there's no way to activate both pickups on either a jazz or a jag.

the les paul - like toggle on the jazzmaster is used to get different tones from the lead pickup, much like a 3 way toggle does for the single pickup broadcaster. the jaguar has 3 switches instead, which, I don't remember what they do, but I think two of them work as "on-off" switches for each pickup.

the jag has a 24 scale. the jazz has a 25.5 scale. the jag pups are quite thin, from the ones I've played (mostly jap reissues) the jag pups are thinner than strat or even tele pups. jazz master pups don't sound fatter or as fat as a P-90, but basically sounds like a decent quality overwound single coil.

I also recommend a buzz stop. It seems to help the over all tension and string response, and seems to help tuning a bit. It also keeps the strings pulled down lower behind the bridge. Sometimes I've had issues with the low E string popping out of the bridge saddle. the buzz stop fixed this. the best thing about it is that you don't need to alter the guitar at all, it just works with the screw holes that are already there.With respect, it's hard to believe you've owned either of these guitars if you think there's no way to activate both pickups at once.

Contrary to popular myth, the switching system on both is actually very simple and effective when you learn what it does, and the sole flaw in either of them is that the Jaguar has an 'off' setting, which is all too easy to hit by accident (but which can easily be modified to give another very useful sound - both pickups in series, which makes it even more flexible - with a little work).

You can't judge the tone of the proper US models from that of the Japanese reissues - which even their fans would admit have weak, thin-sounding pickups which are nothing like the US ones, and which most owners replace - although the rest of the guitar is largely built well. They aren't even RW/RP (hum canceling when both are on) like the US ones.

It's true that they were both designed in a world of clean amps and heavier strings, and didn't take as well to overdrive and light stringing as the Strat and Tele did, but their 'problems' are almost all due to players and techs not understanding how to set them up and use them properly.

walterw
01-01-2008, 06:26 PM
another nice little mod that doesn't radically change the sound and feel like the buzz-stop does is to swap out the adjustable threaded saddles for the solid, center-grooved mustang type. these hold the string in place better, and don't rattle or sink like the others can. they might add a bit of sustain as well, due to being heavier and having fewer moving parts.

Crazyquilt
01-01-2008, 07:59 PM
Walter or John:

Have either of you tried to switch out the 1M linear volume pot for either a 1M audio or a 500k audio pot? I've been thinking about this (more the change from linear to audio) so that the volume pot's got more useful range. It's a bone simple mod, I know, but I'm curious to know if it's worth even (really modest) amount of time necessary to effect it. Thanks.

z3
01-02-2008, 01:54 AM
they are both worth having.
i string my jaguar w/ 8s and tune it up to G for a sort of 'alto' guitar.

there was a great article on how to properly set up the wang bars on these guitars in one of this past years vintage guitar magazines. well worth hunting down.

John Phillips
01-02-2008, 06:20 AM
Have either of you tried to switch out the 1M linear volume pot for either a 1M audio or a 500k audio pot?No, but I did add a bypass cap and resistor to my Jag to cure the sudden volume and treble drop-off. I think from memory that I used .001uF and 220K in parallel, but I don't have the guitar any more to check.

(Something that may have to be corrected, I miss it sometimes :(.)

If the volume drop is too sudden, the last thing you want is a Log pot BTW, that will make it worse.

serial
01-02-2008, 08:21 AM
I've had three '66 Jaguars (still have one) and have a '65 Jazzmaster. The Jags can be cool, but I find them somewhat limited in usefulness for what I play. The JM is one of the most fun guitars I've ever owned to play. It doesn't always work with the stuff I play live, but I bring it out on occasion because it's such a cool, different axe. I've tried to like the Jags as much as my JM, but they don't measure up quite the same for me.

Crazyquilt
01-02-2008, 12:41 PM
there was a great article on how to properly set up the wang bars on these guitars in one of this past years vintage guitar magazines. well worth hunting down.

I missed that one, but there is an excellent article on setting up an offset (http://www.webrocker.de/jaguar/cms/2007/05/12/setup-for-jaguar-and-jazzmaster/) and another more specifically on the tremolo (http://www.webrocker.de/jaguar/cms/2007/05/12/setup-the-tremolo-system/) at The Higher Evolution of Offsets (http://www.webrocker.de/jaguar/cms/index.php) site. That, along with offsetguitars.com, should get just about anyone up to speed with the idiosyncrasies of the Jag & JM.

John Phillips
01-02-2008, 01:07 PM
I missed that one, but there is an excellent article on setting up an offset (http://www.webrocker.de/jaguar/cms/2007/05/12/setup-for-jaguar-and-jazzmaster/) and another more specifically on the tremolo (http://www.webrocker.de/jaguar/cms/2007/05/12/setup-the-tremolo-system/) at The Higher Evolution of Offsets (http://www.webrocker.de/jaguar/cms/index.php) site. That, along with offsetguitars.com, should get just about anyone up to speed with the idiosyncrasies of the Jag & JM.
Setting the trem is far easier than that! ;)

You just set the guitar up fully with the Trem-Lock engaged, then once all done, simply unlock the trem - it will go out of tune, unless you're incredibly lucky - and then turn the trem tension screw until it comes back perfectly to pitch without touching the tuners. Done.

:)

The most important trick I found was to deliberately exaggerate the saddle heights in relation to the bridge base, which increases down-pressure on the saddles and helps with tone and preventing the strings jumping off if you play hard. Then threadlock every screw (including the two at the bottom of the bridge pivot posts, obviously you have to take the bridge out again), and lube everything you want to move.

It's a piece of mechanical engineering no different from anything you'd find anywhere else, and the same principles can be applied...

Crazyquilt
01-02-2008, 01:27 PM
I like your version better, too, John. I'll have to try it (although my new JM -- I just rejoined 'the family' -- is in pretty good shape.)

I was also pondering whether to lower the bridge & raise the saddles or vice versa or split the difference. I've done the latter, as I figured the middle path the safest. But I haven't Loc-tite'd everything yet, as I wanted to play it a bit & see how it felt/worked. I don't feel like I'm getting enough down-pressure on the bridge, but I'm probably just being overly fussy, as I haven't had any string-jumping problems, yet.

opus
01-02-2008, 02:21 PM
ok, since we're talking about the trem set-up on jags/jazzys..., what's the secret to getting the trem arm to stay where you leave it while playing? mine just flops back and hits the guitar cable, it would be great to have it stay where i leave it!

so crazyquilt..., let's see/hear about the new jazzmaster..., what did you get? the old one's still in good hands!

and to the OP, i can pretty much echo what others have said in that the jazzmaster seems to be a more versitile instrument...

John Phillips
01-02-2008, 02:26 PM
ok, since we're talking about the trem set-up on jags/jazzys..., what's the secret to getting the trem arm to stay where you leave it while playing? mine just flops back and hits the guitar cable, it would be great to have it stay where i leave it!You could try tightening up the collet under the plate - probably squeeze it carefully (very carefully) with a pair of vise grips. I don't know if it work or not, I liked the arm to swing out of the way when I wasn't using it. I used a right-angle jack plug on the cable too, as I always do with anything other than a Strat.

z3
01-02-2008, 02:29 PM
ok, since we're talking about the trem set-up on jags/jazzys..., what's the secret to getting the trem arm to stay where you leave it while playing? mine just flops back and hits the guitar cable, it would be great to have it stay where i leave it!

fender has a wee tiny spring that pops under the arm that should deal w/ that. i like it, but most folks i know prefer the arm to swing free.

DavidH
01-02-2008, 03:09 PM
You could try tightening up the collet under the plate - probably squeeze it carefully (very carefully) with a pair of vise grips. I don't know if it work or not, I liked the arm to swing out of the way when I wasn't using it. I used a right-angle jack plug on the cable too, as I always do with anything other than a Strat.

Yes,like John says be very careful when you nip up the collet,they're pretty brittle and will snap fairly easily.I should know,i did it on an early 60s JM once:jo.

EunosFD
01-02-2008, 03:16 PM
Thanks for that quick setup tip John! I've been heavily pondering building up a JM-inspired guitar and was considering other trem options for ease of operation (a Stetsbar was my first choice). But that def makes it a lot easier sounding than I was imagining. :AOK So, the JM trem is back in the running I guess (and a LOT cheaper than the Stetsbar I was gonna go with :D).

My bud's MIJ Jag needs a setup BAAAAAAD and I thought about giving it a go, but the whole bridge/trem setup made me think twice. Maybe I'll give it a go afterall, but it probably needs more work than I'm willing to put into it. :(

Anybody have any experience with a roller bridge on a Jag/JM? Assuming it would work, this Wilkinson unit at Guitar Fetish looks rather interesting (although not "traditional")...

http://store.guitarfetish.com/wibrrobrlost.html

John Phillips
01-02-2008, 05:01 PM
fender has a wee tiny spring that pops under the arm that should deal w/ that.I think you're thinking of a Strat ;).

If you put a spring under the Jag/JM trem arm it will fall right though into the space under the trem unit :).

Crazyquilt
01-02-2008, 05:24 PM
Opus: It's a twin to the guitar you've got now -- ice blue metallic. Within a couple hours of getting the box open, it had the tort guard, Pyramid flats -- and Novak vintage wind pickups (my favorite...seconded by the Lollars in yours.)

As for the trem arm: Wrap a bit of plumber's teflon tape around it. That'll snug it up fine.

z3
01-02-2008, 11:52 PM
If you put a spring under the Jag/JM trem arm it will fall right though into the space under the trem unit :).

i'm certainly gonna have to investigate this.
i never take the arm out and the arm stays put and doesn't 'flop'. i was under the impression that springs were put in (similar to the ones for the strat) in order to stop the arm from moving.

thanx for the heads up.

The Pup
01-03-2008, 12:01 AM
Another good thread.

No buzz stop needed here!

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a166/RCA6L6GC/Thomastikjs1111734243.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a166/RCA6L6GC/IMG_0340sm.jpg

lamenlovinit
01-03-2008, 12:19 PM
Walter or John:

Have either of you tried to switch out the 1M linear volume pot for either a 1M audio or a 500k audio pot?

There's lots of info on swapping out pots and caps. Try the offset guitar forum. They live and breath jags and jms. Mostly people are trying to make the jag less bright... Never got that personally. Best advice I ever heard was form a dude who plays and works in the custom shop. He said with a Jazzmaster start with the tone at 10 and adjust downward. With a Jag, start at 0 and adjust upwards until you like your tone... I still end up at 10:rotflmao

The Pup
01-03-2008, 12:20 PM
...FWIW, Fender 1550's are 0.011"-0.048" with wound G and work fine on JM.

There you have it...a man who knows what he's talking about.

lamenlovinit
01-03-2008, 12:21 PM
which of those two guitars is a better buy? I dont shred...I ususally play prog.rock (early 70s, late 60s), classic rock, and jazz/blues.

so which would be better?
:BEER

Judging from what you play, unless you are a single coil lover a Jag HH http://www.fender.com/products//search.php?partno=0259200306


I love fuzzed out and overdriven jazzmasters and jags myself but the HH goes for around $650, and you can get some killer pickups on Ebay used if you don't dig the stock pups...

Crazyquilt
01-03-2008, 03:41 PM
There's lots of info on swapping out pots and caps. Try the offset guitar forum. They live and breath jags and jms.

Thanks. I'll eventually make it back over there, but I figured, since the topic (sort of) came up, I'd ask folks here whose advice I knew & trusted.

It might just be me, or the amps I'm playing through now, but I'm finding my new-to-me JM more amenable to knob twiddling than my previous one, even though they're identical instruments (AVRI 62s.)

And it's always good to have a partner who's more amenable to knob twiddling. :D

rastus
01-03-2008, 05:37 PM
I own both, a 66 Jag and a 63 JM. The jag has always been harder to play for me, but it is the best for sludgy, loud stoner-rock amps (think Matamp, Orange, Sound City) especially when fronted into a good fuzzbox. But that is pretty much it. I keep the Jag mostly because it's a real nice custom color fender ith a matching head (white w/ tortoise guard) and I got it real cheap 20 years ago. It doesn't get played a lot, really.

The 63 JM is a different story. I use it a lot. Got it in trade for an old Bandmaster reverb head and Ampeg 412 cab back in 88 or so. The guitar has had a minor head crack repair and was refinned black long before I got it. The tuners are inline patent pending Grover rotomatics. It has been refretted once since I have owned it. It has had a Schaller roller saddle tunomatic put on it and the trem works just great! The rhythm pickup is original, but the lead one wa dead, I had it rewound by Van Zandt years ago. He did an overwind on it nad the output is very even. I have always dug the switching scheme, very versatile. The regular Fender scale feels right.

I have contemplated restoring it, but really, it just suits me so well. It's modded just right, I use it a lot. To me it is the perfect guitar for anything that requires a sound that is a cross between a Gretsch and a Fender. I love it distorted too- has a tone that is unique, none of my other stuff sounds remotely like it.

analog22
03-06-2009, 05:46 PM
Contrary to popular myth, the switching system on both is actually very simple and effective when you learn what it does, and the sole flaw in either of them is that the Jaguar has an 'off' setting, which is all too easy to hit by accident (but which can easily be modified to give another very useful sound - both pickups in series, which makes it even more flexible - with a little work).

Does anyone have any info on this mod? Id love to have that extra functionality on my Jag without changing any of the stock parts!

DrumBob
03-06-2009, 06:41 PM
Jazzmasters. I hate Jaguars. They sound awful. I play with a guitarist in a band occasionally, and every time he shows up with his Jaguar, I cringe. It sounds scratchy and tinny all the time.

Grassroots
03-07-2009, 03:11 PM
I have a Japanese Jag that needs new pups. Any suggestions for a more fuzzed out tone?

lamenlovinit
03-08-2009, 12:40 PM
I have a Japanese Jag that needs new pups. Any suggestions for a more fuzzed out tone?

Japanese jags actually sound alot more like US ones than japanese Jazzmasters do, so just going AVRI may not solve your problems. I always use both pickups on with my AVRI when using a fuzzbox or distortion pedal. It's the only way to get that full out fuzz for me. Short of doing something extreme like mounting a humbucking strat pickup...

Stringz
03-08-2009, 02:30 PM
You can always try a Squier Jagmaster.

http://www.squierguitars.com/products/search.php?partno=0320700506

I would go for an out of production Japan built Jagmaster, though. They are a bit higher priced than a new one, but better quality.

Rumblesurfskin
08-31-2009, 09:01 PM
You can always try a Squier Jagmaster.

http://www.squierguitars.com/products/search.php?partno=0320700506

I would go for an out of production Japan built Jagmaster, though. They are a bit higher priced than a new one, but better quality.

I have a Japanese Jag that needs new pups. Any suggestions for a more fuzzed out tone?

Seymour Duncan High Output for Jag will help.

goodtone
08-31-2009, 09:25 PM
My brother-in-law still has his 64 sunburst Jaguar from his band in high school ! Purchased from Mannys in New York City . He just can't part with her and I don't blame him . Jaguars are cool guitars.

Rumblesurfskin
08-31-2009, 09:30 PM
You could try tightening up the collet under the plate - probably squeeze it carefully (very carefully) with a pair of vise grips. I don't know if it work or not, I liked the arm to swing out of the way when I wasn't using it. I used a right-angle jack plug on the cable too, as I always do with anything other than a Strat.


The collet-crimping definitely helps, but you should also try using a sharp-tipped metal punch to strike the shaft of the bar where it fits into the collet. This creates a tiny burr that provides enough friction to keep the bar exactly where you left it and helps prevent it from just falling out.

The reissues have screw-in bars like Strats.

Rumblesurfskin
08-31-2009, 10:16 PM
These are surf guitars! Use plenty of reverb and string 'em up heavy for tremolo picking a la Dick Dale (who uses a Strat with a high E gauged at .14!). Surf guitarists usually swear by either .11 or .12 gauge flatwounds, although I am a big fan of D'Addario half-flats (i.e., "groundwounds"),

I love my early '90s MIJ Jaguar, which was made during a time where Fender USA had ceased production of Jags and JMs. I bought it used with Duncan High Outputs already switched out for the stock pickups, and they have that twangy surf tone. Short scale suits my small hands beautifully. I switched out the stock bridge for a Mustang bridge with deeper individual slots, which helps keep the strings on the saddles. For the same reason, setting the string height really low is not a good idea.

I guess you could play one of these with the tremolo lock on, but why? Buy a hardtail instead. The classic surf bends and dips were invented on this unique, buttery-soft, tremolo system. Since you ought to be using the tremolo alot, tuning stability is definitely an issue since the bridge floats. A Delrin (aka "slipstone") nut has helped with a smooth return.

This guitar has many voices. Play with the pickups, high-cut switch, tone knobs, and your amp settings and you will find everything from single-coil snarl to creamier rhythm tones.

I don't any real experience on the JM side of the debate. However, I just discovered that a bass-player friend has a real '63 JM sitting in his house with no one to play it. It needs "some work", but I think we will be able to work something out.

VaughnC
09-01-2009, 12:37 AM
I'm currently A/B'ing new JM & Jag AVRI's. The JM has sort of a P90'ish wider sonic footprint than the Jag whereas the Jag is tonally more mid scooped & Strat-like. Both are great guitars in their own way...but, being a Strat nut, the Jag seems to a better tonal fit for me. The Jag's string mute and bass cut switch are things I can find use for in my classic rock band that the JM doesn't have...and I like the flashy look of the extra chrome on the Jag. So, for me, the Jag looks like the keeper.

GreenKnight18
09-01-2009, 10:27 AM
I've played both and sold the Jazzmaster. I agree with what an earlier poster said: Jazzmasters sound good with a bit of dirt, while Jaguars sound good clear or really distorted. I mostly play clean, so the the clean neck pup gives me an awesome rich and deep sound. Not scratchy at all.

I think the general consensus is Jazzmasters are a more useful, all-around players for more styles, but for me the Jaguar is the perfect sounding guitar.

FPicker
09-03-2009, 10:17 AM
The collet-crimping definitely helps, but you should also try using a sharp-tipped metal punch to strike the shaft of the bar where it fits into the collet. This creates a tiny burr that provides enough friction to keep the bar exactly where you left it and helps prevent it from just falling out.

The reissues have screw-in bars like Strats.

Specifically, it's the MIM Classic Player Special series that comes with screw-in bars. The other re-issues have snap-in bars, as far as I know.