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View Full Version : Do d'addario strings really do less fret wear than other brands?


still.ill
05-04-2008, 02:14 PM
it says on all their strings "they reduce premature fret wear"

David Collins
05-04-2008, 04:54 PM
I love D'addarios, but :crazy....

Reduce premature wear in relation to what, square steel wire? I'm sure they do.

Compared to some types of string from any manufacturer, yes. Compared to a tons of other string types and makes, no. Good strings, but this is just your average marketing ballyhoo.

Boris Bubbanov
05-04-2008, 05:00 PM
Yeah, in a sort of backwards, inside out way they do.

I have gotten them silly cheap, so I change them more often than I would otherwise. And strings that are neither dirty nor corroded from age and so forth cause less wear on the fretwork during use.

Also, because the D'Ads so cheap, I'll cut them off often and polish the frets with 1500 or 2000 paper, and I believe if you can keep small divots from getting established and can keep the fret tops smooth, they'll wear much longer.

But that isn't the explanation D'Addario is offering, is it?


Bubbanov

still.ill
05-04-2008, 06:12 PM
Yeah, in a sort of backwards, inside out way they do.

I have gotten them silly cheap, so I change them more often than I would otherwise. And strings that are neither dirty nor corroded from age and so forth cause less wear on the fretwork during use.

Also, because the D'Ads so cheap, I'll cut them off often and polish the frets with 1500 or 2000 paper, and I believe if you can keep small divots from getting established and can keep the fret tops smooth, they'll wear much longer.

But that isn't the explanation D'Addario is offering, is it?


Bubbanov


do you mean old strings =faster fret wear?

Boris Bubbanov
05-05-2008, 02:34 AM
do you mean old strings =faster fret wear?

Dirty, corroded ones, sure.

I think if you could keep the strings real clean, the nicks and scratches on the strings would beat up the frets as well, but the dirt would be faster.

By the way, what is D'Ad saying will make the strings last longer? Are they saying the string is smoother, more precisely made and needing no "breaking in"?

oscar100
05-05-2008, 02:36 AM
not in my experience they dont

just marketing BS:MMM

kimock
05-05-2008, 03:05 AM
it says on all their strings "they reduce premature fret wear"

I always thought that the fret wear issue was more related to playing style than anything else, but I heard a story some years back that allows for some name dropping so here goes. . .

Valley Arts sends Larry Carlton two identical brand new Strats, he takes them on the road, favors one, leaves the other in the case.
After the tour, upon examination the two instruments show identical fret wear. The conclusion was that the majority of the fret wear occured in the case from the strings rubbing on the frets while the guitar bounced around in transit. The solution was to take a piece of thin plastic pickguard material cut to fit over the fingerboard which was placed in between the strings and frets while the guitar traveled in its case.
The result being a reduction in premature fret wear, supposedly. . .
Who knows?

Anyway, the idea of protecting the frets from the strings in the case, while travelling, to reduce fret wear sure seems to make sense if you carry your guitar in a bag, so I wouldn't dismiss it entirely.
Relative truthiness of the story notwithstanding.

YMMV

peace sk, endorsee.

Fourth Feline
05-05-2008, 03:37 AM
I agree that this is a puzzler, but I can only think of 2 or 3 things that might make the difference.:

On the wound strings, the outer wrap seems a liitle bit tighter/smoother than ( for example ) Ernie Ball of the same gauge.

Because they come in corrosion resistant packets, the unwound strings seem to settle in and slide across the frets easier on bends.

They are not stainless steel, which is notorious for 'winning the fight' with nickel frets.

However, my first point could equally said of GHS Burnished Nickel strings ( or other slightly rolled brands) - and my second true of any string that is first pulled through a rag impregnated with a little WD40. My third point applies to any brand really.

Tonally and feel wise, I do like D'addario strings - and therefore would prefer to think good things about them, but I would have to be given a more tangible explaination from D'addario themselves as to WHY and HOW they can make this claim.

My only real guess is that the specific alloy used is a touch more maleable than others they have analysed in their R & D department ?

bluesjuke
05-05-2008, 05:57 AM
I have used D'Addario's for years and never noticed this claim by them.


I have very minimal fretwear over the years on all of my guitars and I bend A LOT!
I chalked it up to my style though because I've had the same experience with other strings as well.
The windings on the D'Addaro's are tight and smooth however.

buddastrat
05-05-2008, 06:40 AM
Are they saying that, in hopes we try other brands to compare. Maybe their marketing could backfire on them.

bluesjuke
05-05-2008, 07:03 AM
I guess it's up to your playing techniques, unless you use some nasty strings.


..................we don't have a Barbed Wire emoticon

Festus
05-05-2008, 10:51 AM
I had to dig up a set to check this out. Wow, you read all the stuff printed on a pack of strings? :D On the back of a set of XL nickelwound, it says "XL round wound strings......while providing a smooth, comfortable surface that reduces premature fret wear."

I never noticed that before. It's not on the ProPack boxes (10 sets in a box). Compared to stainless strings, I would imagine so. Compared to other nickel wound strings, never thought to test that theory.

Playing style, string corrosion, and protecting the frets in transit (as Steve K points out) probably have more to do with fret wear than the brand of string.

it says on all their strings "they reduce premature fret wear"

Boris Bubbanov
05-05-2008, 11:31 AM
The conclusion was that the majority of the fret wear occured in the case from the strings rubbing on the frets while the guitar bounced around in transit. The solution was to take a piece of thin plastic pickguard material cut to fit over the fingerboard which was placed in between the strings and frets while the guitar traveled in its case.


I hadn't heard that. Seems like a great measure to take to extend the life of the guitar.

I've got one Fender neck in need of a refret, off a used Thinline. Apparently the previous owner sweated over the guitar more than he played it. The small size frets are much more dented than they are worn, and I've come to realize that once those dents were set into the metal, additional play worsened them in the same way potholes and heavy traffic don't mix. I just parked the neck, and put a big fat one on the Thinline instead with 6105s.

Bubbanov