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View Full Version : ISP Decimator vs Decimator G-String


peckhart
06-10-2009, 07:47 AM
Found a lot of threads about the Decimators...both regular and G-String, but nothing that really compares the two.
I am running a few pedals up front and a few in my loop. I currently have a Boss NS-2 that I have had decent luck with. Right now its up front killing the pedal noise, but I am getting some noise from the loop.
I do want to try it in the loop to see if it will take care of everything, but I am really considering upgrading to one of the Decimators either way.
I would be interested in hearing from anyone that has used both or anyone that has used the G-String in the config that kills the pedal noise up front and integrates it into the FX loop to kill noise there. G-String is a bit more and requires more wiring so I would like to avoid it if it is just not necessary.

pold
06-10-2009, 12:36 PM
It's a good question, I have only the decimator, so I can't compare it with the g-string. Anyway I run it in the fx loop, and it works really well, it kills also the noise coming from the pedals you have in front of your amp.

ReddRanger
06-10-2009, 12:55 PM
It's a good question, I have only the decimator, so I can't compare it with the g-string. Anyway I run it in the fx loop, and it works really well, it kills also the noise coming from the pedals you have in front of your amp.
It's been a while, but that was my experience too.

Running the Decimator in the loop did the trick all around for me.

I think it's a great unit for what it does. I didn't like the Boss NS-2 at all, either in front or in the loop.

peckhart
06-10-2009, 02:35 PM
It's been a while, but that was my experience too.

Running the Decimator in the loop did the trick all around for me.

I think it's a great unit for what it does. I didn't like the Boss NS-2 at all, either in front or in the loop.


What did you not like about the NS-2? Did it do something specific that the Decimator does not do?
I may try to grab a used Decimator and see what kind of improvement it gives me. Can always sell it and try out the G-String later I guess.

nater9
06-10-2009, 03:23 PM
I wanted the G-string, but retailer didn't have it, and I NEEDED noise control immediatley, so I grabbed the decimator and it works great in front. I do still get noise through my loop, so I think I will try it in my loop to see if it works just as well, but also kills my loop noise. If this works, I'm not sure there would be a need for the G-string version. ??

peckhart
06-10-2009, 07:27 PM
I wanted the G-string, but retailer didn't have it, and I NEEDED noise control immediatley, so I grabbed the decimator and it works great in front. I do still get noise through my loop, so I think I will try it in my loop to see if it works just as well, but also kills my loop noise. If this works, I'm not sure there would be a need for the G-string version. ??


I agree..if it works in the loop and kills both I don't see a need for the G-string.
I tried my NS-2 in the loop tonight. Going to run it there for my gig on Friday. It kills more of the noise and I don't have to set the Threshold as high. Only slight drawback is it does feel like there is a slight delay for it to open up where out front it opens more immediate. The positive is that it doesn't seem as sensitive to volume level meaning I can roll my guitar volume back and reacts the same whereas out front it doesn't recognize as strong a signal and wants to stay clamped down more which kills tone and sustain when the volume is lowered.
Still think I want to try the Decimator. From all the hype it seems like a worthy upgrade.

Macaroni
06-10-2009, 07:35 PM
I believe the G-String version lets you have both - you can connect it so that it deals with board noise and loop noise simultaneously. Otherwise, they are exactly the same function/feature wise.

Waxhead
06-10-2009, 08:07 PM
It's been a while, but that was my experience too.

Running the Decimator in the loop did the trick all around for me.

I think it's a great unit for what it does. I didn't like the Boss NS-2 at all, either in front or in the loop.

+1
The G-string is a little bit more effective if you have really wicked humm issues. The standard ISP is great also as is the MXR Smart Gate. The Smart Gate is also cheaper.

All 3 pedals are much better and more effective than the NS-2 IMHO. They also don't effect amp tone or sustain if adjusted properly. The loop is the best place for all noise gates IMO.

nater9
06-11-2009, 12:01 AM
Okay, played with the decimator tonight in my loop - that's where it's gonna stay. It killed my DD-20 "heartbeat" sound (in my loop) when I'm using my gain channel, plus worked like a charm on any other fuzz pedals I was using in front. Great tip pold. I was trying to hear if it opened any slower, and I thought maybe it was a few nano seconds slower, but then I thought maybe it was just in my head. Either way, I'm going to be using it there from now on.

pold
06-11-2009, 03:10 AM
Okay, played with the decimator tonight in my loop - that's where it's gonna stay. It killed my DD-20 "heartbeat" sound (in my loop) when I'm using my gain channel, plus worked like a charm on any other fuzz pedals I was using in front. Great tip pold. I was trying to hear if it opened any slower, and I thought maybe it was a few nano seconds slower, but then I thought maybe it was just in my head. Either way, I'm going to be using it there from now on.

That's great, how did you set it? Normally if I have a fuzzface on, I have to set the knob at 12 oclock more or less. How about yours?

nater9
06-11-2009, 11:40 AM
I usually keep it just about 12 o'clock, a little less if I can get away with it. I would only need it at about 9 oclock for most of my pedals, but when I use my Fuzz Face, I need it a bit higher. I just love that it kills my DD 20's annoying sound now!! The only problem with a 12 oclock setting is when I roll my volume down I can really loose my decay, so if I'm playing that low, I usually just click it off. Thanks again!

Macaroni
06-11-2009, 11:50 AM
FYI...

More info on the G-String from the ISP site...

The Decimator G String provides a totally independent channel of Decimator noise reduction that can be inserted into a series effects loop or after a preamp section with the advantage of having the Decimator level detectors track the guitar signal directly. With the G String pedal you can set the threshold and no matter what level of noise the Decimator will track perfectly without any side effects.

As can be seen in the diagram, the G String noise reduction pedal has an input to connect a guitar directly and a buffered output signal to feed the front of a guitar rig directly while providing a separate audio channel of Decimator that can be inserted in the signal chain of any guitar rig.

You can insert any other pedals between the output of the Decimator G String and the input of your guitar amplifier. This allows the Decimator G String pedal to remove any level of noise you may have even with overdrive pedals at the front end of the amp.

ReddRanger
06-11-2009, 12:19 PM
What did you not like about the NS-2? Did it do something specific that the Decimator does not do?
I may try to grab a used Decimator and see what kind of improvement it gives me. Can always sell it and try out the G-String later I guess.

For example...I was using a Mesa Dual Rec. With the only the NS-2 in front of the amp, it seemed like it killed tone and I didn't like the quality of the gate/noise suppression. For me, it didn't work in the loop at all and I couldn’t get it dialed in (actually I don't think they were designed for loops? I can't remember...).

Anyhow, putting the Decimator in front of the amp was an immediate improvement. No tone suck either perceived or real, IMO. Moving it into the loop, it performed exactly as I wanted with great precision. Very, very effective.

+1
The G-string is a little bit more effective if you have really wicked humm issues. The standard ISP is great also as is the MXR Smart Gate. The Smart Gate is also cheaper.

All 3 pedals are much better and more effective than the NS-2 IMHO. They also don't effect amp tone or sustain if adjusted properly. The loop is the best place for all noise gates IMO.
+1. I used the Smart Gate after I got rid of my NS-2. It was a great improvement that I used for quite a while before going to the Decimator.

In the loop is the way to go with either the Smart Gate or Decimator. Forget the NS-2.

pold
06-11-2009, 01:00 PM
Don't forget to run the decimator FIRST in the fx loop, all the other pedals follow (just another one in my case, the Hardwire RV-7). Al the other pedals I have sound better in front of the amp (Mojo Vibe, Sunface, COT 50).

ettepostkonto
03-01-2012, 04:11 AM
So since I only have old, non fx loop amps (and don't foresee myself ever buying a fancy new bells and whistles ones either) I will only need the regular Decimator?

I mean, there's no point for me in a Decimator G String unless I have an amp with a loop, right?

rhythmrocker
03-01-2012, 04:55 AM
So since I only have old, non fx loop amps (and don't foresee myself ever buying a fancy new bells and whistles ones either) I will only need the regular Decimator?

I mean, there's no point for me in a Decimator G String unless I have an amp with a loop, right?

i am very satisfied with a Regular Decimator in front of my amps - if I want feedback, I turn it off right there on the board. Works great with single coil noise.

Macaroni
03-01-2012, 11:29 AM
Not correct. It has nothing to do with the amp's fx loop. Go to their website and read up on the difference.

nofearfactor
03-01-2012, 11:46 AM
Depends on the amp in my experience with noise reduction. Rack or pedals. And with loops, all of my different amps are totally different.

I think Ive used pretty much all of the noise reduction units- from Rocktrons Hush rack noise reduction units and the ISP Decimator rack unit to the now the ISP Decimator pedal on my pedal boards. The Boss NS-2 and Rocktron Hush pedals never worked well for me. Also depends on if you are using dirt pedals. Some musicians run noise reduction pedals before and after dirt pedals. Since I use my amps preamps for distortion, always have, my noise reduction goes in the effects loop.

My Mesa Dual Rec Solo head modulation effects work best in the front with tuner and wah and my time effects, delay and reverb, work best in the loop. I have the ISP last in the chain. I found if I run it about 10-11oclock with that amp it works fine and cuts out less delays.

My 5150 and 6505s I run everything in the loop- rack or pedal effects. My chain is tuner, modulation effects, then time effects, BBE sonic maximizer(this unit doesnt work at all in my Dual Rec but it makes this amp totally come alive), then ISP last again. The 5150/6505s are noisier than my Mesa heads so I nudge the ISP up to almost 12oclock or just right at the verge of losing some delay trails. Works great.

djy8131
03-01-2012, 11:51 AM
I run mine last in the chain. Is the regular Decimator buffered?

ettepostkonto
03-02-2012, 06:55 AM
Not correct. It has nothing to do with the amp's fx loop. Go to their website and read up on the difference.

OK - get it, if I only use it in front of my amps (since non of the has fx loop) I can hook up dirt pedals in the G-string loop, or just use a patch cable to make it work like a regular Decimator.

Question is if that "dirt loop" is worth the extra $$.

Maybe, maybe not...

Macaroni
03-02-2012, 08:38 AM
You can use it in the amp's fx loop if you want, but it was designed more for on the floor loop. I had the original Decimator and the G-String was a worthwhile bump up.