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View Full Version : What jobs pay min 40K a year?


steve108819
02-01-2010, 02:25 PM
I know this isn't the best time to be looking for a career change, but I'm beyond burnout with my current job which I've had for the past 14 plus years. I deliver uniforms for a large rental company. I'm in my late 30's with a college degree in Hotel Restaurant Admin(I no longer have ANY intentions of working in that field) I'm having a hard time thinking outside the box for other possible career avenues. It seems that most things I see require a certain experience or expertise that I don't have. I can learn new things quickly, but can't afford to go back to school for a new direction. I realistically need something that pays at least 40K a year to pay my bills. More would be great, but that would be the minimum. What are the some of the things you guys do for a living? Thanks

mojocaster.com
02-01-2010, 02:27 PM
Too many to list. IT is always in demand, and you can learn at your own pace at home.

Moe45673
02-01-2010, 02:27 PM
Look into government jobs. At least here in Canada, they pay quite a bit more than similar jobs elsewhere

dkaplowitz
02-01-2010, 02:28 PM
Police/corrections officer. Not my job, but that pays in the range you mentioned, I think. Plus you get to carry a gun, which is priceless. :D

hippiebob
02-01-2010, 02:28 PM
I'm a senior in school for Accounting. Is your degree a business degree?

derekd
02-01-2010, 02:29 PM
Nursing.

bigdaddy
02-01-2010, 02:42 PM
Sales.

mrbungel
02-01-2010, 03:01 PM
Crack dealer

sixstring531
02-01-2010, 03:04 PM
Pharm sales rep --- most GOOD sales jobs. I made nearly $60k in one year hiring truck drivers from other companies whilst walking around a truck lot 30 hours a week. Was nice, but the commute and a few other facets of the job really got to me. (yes, I know, I am leaving myself up to funnies with 'other facets' but I really don't want to talk bad about the company)

I now do marketing for a non-profit hospital system and make absolutely nothing compared to that and putting in more hours.

mojocaster.com
02-01-2010, 03:20 PM
Man-whore


that's always such a useful and exciting suggestion ;)

steve108819
02-01-2010, 03:35 PM
that's always such a useful and exciting suggestion ;)
As was crack dealer. I know that the good money is always in sales, but I suck at that. I don't like being pushy, because I know how much I hate pushy salesman myself. I've always wondered how one gets into "consulting" And to the nursing suggestion, I've thought about that, but I honestly can't afford to quit my job for the schooling. Thanks for the responses guys. Keep 'em coming.

ACfixer
02-01-2010, 03:39 PM
Nursing.

+1 You can't earn more money for less schooling than either an RN or a respiratory therapist. Hint: RT's don't deal with feces.

zekmoe
02-01-2010, 03:39 PM
40k isn't that much, and you "might" be able to get into some HR position, depending on how you present yourself an your resume. What did you do in hotel mgt? Manage Staff or something else?

Luke
02-01-2010, 03:42 PM
+1 You can't earn more money for less schooling than either an RN or a respiratory therapist. Hint: RT's don't deal with feces.

aka Snot Sucker

Blue Fin
02-01-2010, 03:42 PM
Dog catcher.

steve108819
02-01-2010, 04:36 PM
40k isn't that much, and you "might" be able to get into some HR position, depending on how you present yourself an your resume. What did you do in hotel mgt? Manage Staff or something else?
I never even got above front desk before I realized it wasn't for me. I wasn't a very mature 18 when I picked my major. I found out soon after entering the hotel world that the pay is terrible and the hours are even worse. On the plus side I've heard more than one HR person say that ANY degree is good thing, even if it doesn't apply to actual field.


Maybe I'll start a new topic, but I'd really like to know if there's any way to make decent money in a music related field. Something other than gigging. Is it even possible in this day and age? The old saying " Do something you love and you'll never work a day in your life" keeps going through my head. The one constant love in my life that has never changed since my earliest memories is music. This would be my first choice, but if I can't find a way to make a living involving music somehow, I'm back to the original question of 40K a year jobs.

jaycee
02-01-2010, 04:52 PM
Too many to list. IT is always in demand, and you can learn at your own pace at home.

Could you or someone else point to a good resource to begin learning at home? I'd like to broaden my computer skills a little.

So as not to completely hijack, i will offer a suggestion. I know the OP said no to school but short certificate programs might be a good thing to think about. An entry biotech position might get you close to 40k.

HammyD
02-01-2010, 05:12 PM
A buddy who was looking at being outsourced to Mexico looked into MRI technician. 2 years at night, technical college. Excellent pay, work environment.... I would look into anything supporting the medical profession since that seems to be the field with substantial growth potential.

As for IT, I read there are 6 people for every open position. I thought I had job security in IT at a well respected private college. They laid off the two with the most experience, the other person having been there 27 years. They all think some kid right of college knows more than someone with years of real world experience.

ACfixer
02-01-2010, 05:34 PM
aka Snot Sucker

Yeah no kidding, but I'll bet it beats wiping a sick person's filthy rump.

Blindspot
02-01-2010, 05:36 PM
I hear you can pull like $1,500 a day just stuffing envelopes from home! (I was reading a comic book when I learned of this, however....)

dkaplowitz
02-01-2010, 05:43 PM
As for IT, I read there are 6 people for every open position. I thought I had job security in IT at a well respected private college. They laid off the two with the most experience, the other person having been there 27 years. They all think some kid right of college knows more than someone with years of real world experience.
No field (with very few exceptions) gives someone absolute security against being outsourced/layed off/made redundant, replaced with a shell script. Although IT has its ups and downs, I don't see our collective dependence on computers, servers, mobile devices, smart phones, smart homes, databases, data warehouses, digital libraries, web content, authentication, single sign on, networking, routers, security, virus protection, hack-proofing, etc. etc. ad infinitum, diminishing any time soon.

If you like the work and have an affinity for it, you will find work in IT. I've worked steady for 11+ years (at a bunch of jobs, not just at one place). It's a good field. And you can be more eccentric than the suits and the regular shlubs.

Dave

FlyingDutchman
02-01-2010, 05:55 PM
Be a mailman..Great pay and benefits.

rmj254
02-01-2010, 06:06 PM
It may be tough to find something that requires no extra schooling at all. It seems like you don't want to work in a lot of areas. Would going back to school be an option in any capacity?

If so:

Occupational Therapy Assistant or Physical Therapy Assistant -- Associate's Degree, and the pay can be outstanding for the amount of schooling. Plus, you can work in a variety of settings. (> 60k/yr)

RN -- As some have already mentioned, you can get an Associate's Degree in this field too. Excellent pay, and you can work in a ton of places.

Physician Assistant/ Nurse Practitioner -- Would require quite a bit more schooling. It is a Master's Degree, plus some pre-requisite courses and taking the GRE to get admitted. Do you have a Bachelor's Degree already? This field pays GREAT money (> 75k, and often better than 100k). You also can work in any area of medicine in which a physician can be licensed, provided they use PA's.

Occupational Therapist -- This is a Master's Degree level field that pays well and offers excellent flexibility. The pay is also good.

Just some ideas if you're willing/ able to go back to school. Not sure if you're interested in health fields at all, but hopefully those are some decent ideas.

calpa94
02-01-2010, 06:20 PM
Hey Steve, I'm 39 and work in the nursing home/assisted living business but on the dietary side. I also have a degree in hotel,restaurant and institutional management. The whole geriatric business fly's under the radar since most don't want to work around old people. I can't see myself doing this for the next ten years but it's okay for now.

Do you have any interest in starting a business? I've been in sales, retail, truck leasing and food service and i've come to the conclusion they're all the same. I'm extremely tired of corporate managers and budgets and the rest of the bullshit that goes with the territory. My goal is to be self employed within the next three years.

HammyD
02-01-2010, 06:42 PM
No field (with very few exceptions) gives someone absolute security against being outsourced/layed off/made redundant, replaced with a shell script. Although IT has its ups and downs, I don't see our collective dependence on computers, servers, mobile devices, smart phones, smart homes, databases, data warehouses, digital libraries, web content, authentication, single sign on, networking, routers, security, virus protection, hack-proofing, etc. etc. ad infinitum, diminishing any time soon.

If you like the work and have an affinity for it, you will find work in IT. I've worked steady for 11+ years (at a bunch of jobs, not just at one place). It's a good field. And you can be more eccentric than the suits and the regular shlubs.

Dave

I agree, to a certain degree. There has to be a willingness to relocate and the higher up the ladder, the less likely to be outsourced.

Where I see major changes in the industry is when business are forced to look hard at IT expenditures. In many cases its just good business to outsource. Look at things like offsite storage. At the college we could have outsourced the network area storage to Apple and Carbonite, provided better service to our clients, and provided better security.

I would think an understanding of business and operations, as well as technology would be the most secure given the incredible dependence by most businesses and colleges.

What I was referring to were the limited study, relatively quick entry positions the thread starter was asking about. It may get you in the door, but you better maintain your studies and continue to complete certifications. The guys I know with two year degrees form tech schools and institutes may know their stuff, but its cheaper to outsource them. And companies are.

In my case, the head of It was a former Chemistry professor who could not configure his own laptop to work with the wireless network. He did not know technology, so he cut personell. The faculty demanded his resignation and got it. But a lot of places are only looking at the bottom line.

sixstring531
02-01-2010, 07:28 PM
Sales isn't for everyone - and you DON'T have to be pushy to be a successful salesperson. You have to have great people skills and be able to read and supply your customer with what he/she needs and or wants -- sometimes you have to help create the need or want, but you don't have to be the old stereotypical 'pushy car salesman sleazeball' to be great at sales.

jcmark611
02-01-2010, 07:54 PM
If you don't mind travel you'd probably be able to get a job with Amtrak as a Manager of On Board Services. Amtrak trains are basically motels on wheels. The jobs start out at $65,000.

XKnight
02-01-2010, 08:12 PM
If you're willing to work as a public school teacher within inner city schools you should be able to get a teaching job making around $40K or more to start.

steve108819
02-01-2010, 08:18 PM
It seems like you don't want to work in a lot of areas. Would going back to school be an option in any capacity?

I think the only 2 things I said I wasn't interested in was sales and hotel management. Maybe my problem with sales is I've never had to sell something that I completely believed in. Maybe that would make the difference. School would be an option if we could afford it. I don't need a job, I have a perfectly good one that isn't going anywhere. I just don't enjoy it and don't want to find my life passing me by while doing something I don't enjoy.

Cap'nMayhem
02-01-2010, 08:35 PM
I'm a Union Ironworker. I don't necessarily recommend it as a career unless you like hard physical work, 'cause it is HARD physical work. It's down right back breaking at times, but the pay is good. 1st period apprentices in my area (Los Angeles) make $16 an hour or more plus benefits. As a Journeyman I'm making $32+ an hour plus bennys. I usually make between 70 and 80 thousand a year if I'm able to work steady, which is usually. Things are a bit slow still but are set to pick up quite a bit by March.

oldschoolguy
02-01-2010, 09:20 PM
Pass a civil service test and you can become a postal worker; oddly enough I've learned that these are fairly competitive. Then we can complain about you ruining our gear shipments.

Rock Johnson
02-01-2010, 09:24 PM
usajobs.com.

If you're into the law enforcement side, look at Customs & Border Protection. If you're not into that, really check out Social Security Administration.

baddmann28
02-01-2010, 09:31 PM
In all honesty, with the amount of people unemployed today, I'd ride it out a while. If something happens and you are laid off, most states offer a Best type of program that will help you along with schooling to get back in the workplace. Not to be a smart ass, as this isn't intended this way, but it's called work for a reason. Most people don't like their job, they tolerate it. I know a few guys that are touring musicians backing up big name acts. They are both divorced, and never see their kids. They are basically miserable. And this is a job they went to school for and dreamed of their entire lives. Professionally they love it. Their personal lives stink.
So, I look at it as a trade off. Work is only 8-10 hours per day max, with 25 vacation days, and weekends and nights with the people I love (my wife and kids).

I'd think long and hard before leaving a job that's paying the bills, unless it's a rock solid opportunity that you are certain will last. Just my opinion of course.

If you have to look at a new job, you have to ask yourself what can you do? Are you really good at instrument setups, soldering, wood working etc? Look for a tech job PT until you know there's enough work to quit your job.

Can you read / teach music? Work as a guitar instructor.
Are you mechanicly inclined? Can you do a complete brake job / engine rebuild? Auto techs make decent money.

You have to ask yourself what are you good at, then look up that field.

crazyForce
02-01-2010, 10:02 PM
+1 You can't earn more money for less schooling than either an RN or a respiratory therapist. Hint: RT's don't deal with feces.

But if you aren't familiar, you will be quickly surprised at what you do have to deal with. The human body is an amazing factory of secretions and strange effluence.

SteveO
02-01-2010, 10:07 PM
But if you aren't familiar, you will be quickly surprised at what you do have to deal with. The human body is an amazing factory of secretions and strange effluence.

Yeah, certain threads are just oozing with strange effluence!

jac37656
02-01-2010, 10:26 PM
Entry-level-anything in the oil and gas industry, whether field or home office. Seriously, those companies make obscene profits, so even starting gigs - so long as they require a brain - make pretty good money. And the international jobs = $$$$$$.

PAF
02-01-2010, 10:35 PM
Delivery driver experience plus a management degree - what about dispatch or logistics or transportation management?

Jerrod
02-01-2010, 11:32 PM
If you want to do something you enjoy, you should start thinking down those lines. There are zillions of jobs that can make you $40k.

Ronnie-Earl-fan
02-02-2010, 05:29 AM
Do you have any hobbies, Steve108819? You might be able to find a way to turn one or two of them into part-time jobs, which you can build on and turn into small businesses if you wish. I enjoy learning languages, and have taught myself French and German to a high degree of fluency, just for fun, and in my spare time - so when the credit crunch left me in the red, I picked up some freelance translation work. It is now a regular (and very lucrative) sideline.

Good luck.

6stringgrind
02-02-2010, 05:31 AM
Pass a civil service test and you can become a postal worker; oddly enough I've learned that these are fairly competitive. Then we can complain about you ruining our gear shipments.

As a letter carrier, I can tell you that this isn't the best way to go currently. There's pretty much a hiring freeze going on and has been for the last couple years. USPS is looking to downsize, not add more workers. It's a sinking ship.

mwc2112
02-02-2010, 06:01 AM
In all honesty, with the amount of people unemployed today, I'd ride it out a while.

Well, there's a difference between looking for another job while you already have one then just quitting (or getting laid off) and trying to find work. I would certainly continue working while working towards something else. Case in point: my wife and I are both looking for jobs. She has a very well paying job currently and is in little danger of being laid off, so she has some flexibility and not a huge sense of urgency to take just anything. I was laid off 2 months ago today and it sucks because my severance runs out in a couple weeks and I start dipping into savings. There will be some point where I'll have to take something (likely at a lower pay then my previous job) if I can't find something in my current field.

I guess my point is that I would certainly suggest the OP continue to work while working towards something else.

baddmann28
02-02-2010, 06:47 AM
Well, there's a difference between looking for another job while you already have one then just quitting (or getting laid off) and trying to find work. I would certainly continue working while working towards something else. Case in point: my wife and I are both looking for jobs. She has a very well paying job currently and is in little danger of being laid off, so she has some flexibility and not a huge sense of urgency to take just anything. I was laid off 2 months ago today and it sucks because my severance runs out in a couple weeks and I start dipping into savings. There will be some point where I'll have to take something (likely at a lower pay then my previous job) if I can't find something in my current field.

I guess my point is that I would certainly suggest the OP continue to work while working towards something else.


Yep and my point in that is losing seniority is a big deal, especially how quickly some will lay off. No company is going to tell you, hey, you are better off not taking this job, it might not last long. I'd wait the few years until this thing we are in plays out. Just my advice. I do not, nor do I associate with people that have Masters degrees. I am working folk like my peers. None of us "like" our jobs, but we all have good jobs that pay the bills. Security is a good thing. I prefer it over enjoying every aspect of my job.

Solcat
02-02-2010, 07:25 AM
Claims representative.

telejammer
02-02-2010, 07:50 AM
A friend of mine is an Independent Owner/Operator for Thomas' muffins, bagels,and Brownberry whole grain breads. He netted $104,000. last year, but pays his own taxes, insurance and vehicle costs out of that, still cleared over $65,000. Not bad for not having a degree.

Dubious
02-02-2010, 09:45 AM
Graphic - Web Design

if you rock serious design skills and can do Flash, CSS and HTMl you can be golden.

I'm completely self taught and have a BFA (possibly the most useless college degree in the WORLD)

HammyD
02-02-2010, 10:09 AM
Graphic - Web Design

if you rock serious design skills and can do Flash, CSS and HTMl you can be golden.

I'm completely self taught and have a BFA (possibly the most useless college degree in the WORLD)

When I taught an odd combination of computer science and art, primarily Flash and Photoshop, at the University one semester, they suggested I get a MMA, a Masters in Media Arts. BFA is the perfect degree prior, and the MMA is a terminal degree, no Phd. So you can be tenure track without a Phd (a rarity) and the University said those with a MMA are in high demand.

steve108819
02-03-2010, 03:45 PM
Thanks guys for all the great advice. I appreciate it. I'm giving a few of the recommendations some deeper thought and research.

strat68
02-03-2010, 04:56 PM
What about township or county jobs, maybe some kind of inspector or similar (thinking where your 50/50 in the office and travelling locally). I know they are sometimes hard to get into, but maybe you know someone in the biz?