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Randy
04-06-2010, 09:49 AM
Forgive my ignorance here - I've played electric my whole life, but would like to add a good acoustic into my stable. Trouble is that I'm not much of a strummer, I'm more of a bender. I've been trying out a bunch of acoustics, but I can't bend .012 bronze strings a whole step, at least not easily.

What's the solution, if there is one? I'm thinking 24 3/4 scale, .011 strings with an unwould G.... anything else I should consider? I can't be the only one that wants to play bluesy leads on an acoustic. :huh

nmiller
04-06-2010, 10:12 AM
A short scale certainly does help, and you can get acoustic strings down to at least .10; I use D'Addario 10-47 flat tops (http://store.daddario.com/category/145773/EFT15_Extra_Light_10-47) on one of my acoustics.

SmilingDave
04-06-2010, 10:17 AM
I have used electric guitar strings on an acoustic with interesting results. You won't get the same quality of sound that acoustic strings deliver, but if it meets your needs ...

RockinB23
04-06-2010, 11:16 AM
use some 13's and man up! :)

Nothing ruins a good acoustic like 11's or 10's. I play acoustic so much that I find my electrics too easy to play with 10's even 11's.

zombywoof
04-06-2010, 11:59 AM
I gotta agree that to get the most an acoustic has to give you have to drive the top and lighter guage strings just ain't gonna get you there.

You could always tune the guitar down. This will give you the fattest A7 chord this side of Lightnin' Hopkins and make it easier to pull off some deep bends. Hey Lightnin,' Lonnie Johnson, even Albert King were known to tune all the way down down to C to get them bends that could suck the air out of a room.

tonesurfer
04-06-2010, 12:10 PM
I use 10s normally tuned on my electrics and 12s tuned down to Eb on my acoustics. The string tension is roughly the same. I bend a lot too.

10s on an acoustic lacks balls. Tune down! :)

musicofanatic5
04-06-2010, 01:04 PM
Forgive my ignorance here - I've played electric my whole life, but would like to add a good acoustic into my stable. Trouble is that I'm not much of a strummer, I'm more of a bender. I've been trying out a bunch of acoustics, but I can't bend .012 bronze strings a whole step, at least not easily.

What's the solution, if there is one? I'm thinking 24 3/4 scale, .011 strings with an unwould G.... anything else I should consider? I can't be the only one that wants to play bluesy leads on an acoustic. :huh

"would like to add a good acoustic into my stable"

Why? Because you like the tone of an acoustic? You will not get anything resembling a good acoustic gtr sound with some pussified strings. If you like the sound of an acoustic gtr, get a good one and use "acoustic light-gauge" (.052-.012) strings. Play it like it's an acoustic gtr, not like it's a LP. Limit yourself to half-step bends, slide into notes your might normally bend into on an electric (listen to Paul Geremia). Or...have an acoustic that you can play SRV on and sounds like crap. your choice.

edward
04-06-2010, 02:03 PM
Gotta agree: 12s are the lightest I'd go on an acoustic. If you don't drive the top, the tone suffers. It's not just a "man up" thing ...it's a tone thing. And last time I checked, an acoustic is fundamentally different than an electric. Treat the acoustic like the different instrument that it is ...which includes altering your style appropriate to the guitar.

Edward

PFCG
04-06-2010, 04:36 PM
Try the Martin Silk and Steel strings. they are 11.5 gauge, and they work and sound great on my breedlove!

Lower tension, and lower volume, but the tone is still there 100%

Randy
04-06-2010, 06:58 PM
"would like to add a good acoustic into my stable"

Why? Because you like the tone of an acoustic? You will not get anything resembling a good acoustic gtr sound with some pussified strings. If you like the sound of an acoustic gtr, get a good one and use "acoustic light-gauge" (.052-.012) strings. Play it like it's an acoustic gtr, not like it's a LP. Limit yourself to half-step bends, slide into notes your might normally bend into on an electric (listen to Paul Geremia). Or...have an acoustic that you can play SRV on and sounds like crap. your choice.

Gotta agree: 12s are the lightest I'd go on an acoustic. If you don't drive the top, the tone suffers. It's not just a "man up" thing ...it's a tone thing. And last time I checked, an acoustic is fundamentally different than an electric. Treat the acoustic like the different instrument that it is ...which includes altering your style appropriate to the guitar.

Edward

So are you guys really bending .012's a full step routinely, or are you saying I should forget about being able to do full step bends on an acoustic?

I appreciate the point - having a tension that is light enough to bend fairly easily will sacrifice that classic acoustic tone. But as I said in my OP, I'm an electric player who would like to add an acoustic. It would be a much bigger sacrifice for me to give up bending strings, redevelop my hand strength completely, or change my fundamental technique after 30 years of playing. I'd much rather sacrifice a little tone if that's what it takes to make it playable for my style - I'm not a strummer and don't need that type of tone.

I find it hard to believe there aren't more people that have figured out a way to get good acoustic tones with bendable tension, or that everyone who does bend has developed the strength to do it with .012's or thicker. :huh

Thanks to everyone for the rest of the comments - they've been helpful.

stevel
04-06-2010, 07:15 PM
It would be a much bigger sacrifice for me to give up bending strings, redevelop my hand strength completely, or change my fundamental technique after 30 years of playing.

Hmmm. For me, learning to do something new is hardly a sacrifice. Generally speaking, it makes me a better player, it makes me feel more confident about my abilities, gives me a sense of accomplishment, provides a variety of approaches to music - I could go on.

Randy, here's your solution: get a VG system - install a MIDI pup on your guitar and select the Acoustic guitar patch on your roland VG guitar synth/modeler.

You will have the sound of an acoustic, without losing the ability to play your electric and do those bends. The virtual guitar sound will be as good as what you're going to have to do to an acoustic to make it "bendable".

For me, the POINT of moving to an acoustic is to break out of playing "the same old way" - it's "built in restrictions" force me to approach music-making in different, and sometimes new and exciting ways.

You say you're not much of a "strummer"? Well, hasn't the though every occurred to you that maybe you should improve on this technique? After all, it is one of the major techniques of playing guitar. It seems to me that you're trying to take the easy way out.

No offense, just trying to help.

Steve

hammersig
04-06-2010, 07:25 PM
If you start out with 12's or a good standard guage and play regularly, such as everyday, you will build the strength and technique to do the bends you want to do. It's like anything else when learning a new lick or run, it just takes time and repetition to perfect. Hang in there, and it will come. And you will be glad you stuck to the beefier strings when it does. Whole step bends are kind of tough on acoustic though, usually because the action is necessarily set higher. That's where the technique come in to either get you there, or to emulate those huge bends. Good luck buddy!

walterw
04-06-2010, 07:28 PM
I find it hard to believe there aren't more people that have figured out a way to get good acoustic tones with bendable tension, or that everyone who does bend has developed the strength to do it with .012's or thicker. :huh

+1 to playing an acoustic like an acoustic!

the "trick" is to bend where you can bend, and slide where you must slide.

the E and especially the B will bend just fine. the B will be your main "bending" string on an acoustic.

a wound G will not give you a real whole-step bend. it doesn't matter how strong you are, the string itself just won't do it. it'll break before it gets there half the time.

what i learned to do was "cheat" on the G string by sliding up a half-step, then bending a half-step. done smoothly enough and incorporated with bending the other strings normally, you can play "regular" lead guitar on your acoustic and it'll work reasonably well.

i think that's how all the cool jump blues guys did it on their archtops in the '40s and '50s.

(plain Gs sound like ass on an acoustic no matter how heavy they are. just say no.)

Randy
04-06-2010, 07:38 PM
Hmmm. For me, learning to do something new is hardly a sacrifice. Generally speaking, it makes me a better player, it makes me feel more confident about my abilities, gives me a sense of accomplishment, provides a variety of approaches to music - I could go on.

Randy, here's your solution: get a VG system - install a MIDI pup on your guitar and select the Acoustic guitar patch on your roland VG guitar synth/modeler.

You will have the sound of an acoustic, without losing the ability to play your electric and do those bends. The virtual guitar sound will be as good as what you're going to have to do to an acoustic to make it "bendable".

For me, the POINT of moving to an acoustic is to break out of playing "the same old way" - it's "built in restrictions" force me to approach music-making in different, and sometimes new and exciting ways.

You say you're not much of a "strummer"? Well, hasn't the though every occurred to you that maybe you should improve on this technique? After all, it is one of the major techniques of playing guitar. It seems to me that you're trying to take the easy way out.

No offense, just trying to help.

Steve

Stevel I appreciate your points, really, but I can see I haven't explained myself fully.

I'm not a strummer because I've really no desire to be, not because it's some weakness I've been putting off learning. I just don't care for that style of music. I'd much rather apply myself to becoming a jazz pianist... or maybe a concert violinist. But I digress.

I'd like to add an acoustic to my arsenal because A: I've hooked up with a great singer/songwriter and we'd like to be able to do some coffeehouse gigs - unplugged versions of blues / rock songs. And also B: I'd like to be able to swing through the livingroom and grab a guitar and play my usual fare without the hassle of turning on an amp and plugging in an electric down in my jam room.

I really just want an acoustic I can bend strings on ...

It sounds like short scale / light gauge strings / down-tuning are what I should be considering.

Flyin' Brian
04-06-2010, 07:43 PM
Larry Carlton is the king when it comes to bending and bending in tune. He commented on one of his videos that he doesn't bend on his acoustic. He uses 12s and says that he needs them in order to drive the top properly, so he slides instead of bending because he'd rather play in tune.

edward
04-06-2010, 10:57 PM
Hi Randy,

Yes, I just tried it ...full step bends easy with 12s on the E and B. Or even with 13s with that guitar tuned to Eb. Forget about it on the G ...the wound string just ain't goin that far.

FWIW, I am also more an electric player than an acoustic strummer, but I also love the singer/songwriter vibe. So I normally will "noodle around" with single-note lines if I'm not in front. That said, there is still some adaptation to be done playing leads and fills on an acoustic. Don't think of it as a sacrifice or copout to adjust your style to fit the acoustic; think of it as stretching of your abilities, as if you're learning a new instrument.

Edward

mjm59
04-07-2010, 01:55 AM
Why not a Taylor T5? Sounds like you're not interested in a real acoustic anyway, just that "sound" (although without the wound G, I don't know how you'll get there...)
http://www.taylorguitars.com/guitars/electric/models/ModelDetails.aspx?modelid=4

evrhrduvdillard?
04-08-2010, 03:57 PM
I have more than one acoustic that I use for a strat. I bend a whole steps. I play voodoo child. I like Martin medium strings. When Zakk Wylde was asked about playing a 13 lb LP with 13 gauge strings held up by a metal chain instead of a strap he said "Eat steak, Lift weights, don't be a *****."

AnthonyL
04-08-2010, 04:05 PM
Strings - DR Sunbeams

They're great for bending...

From the website:

Sunbeam phosphor bronze strings are handwound upon round cores which give a terrific result...wonderful sustain...remarkable sustain.

The tone does not seem to decay as do other phosphor bronze strings, which we think of as decaying in a curve. The Sunbeam phosphor seem to sustain in a straight line, until the sound "falls off". The Sunbeam phosphor are also musically bright, and rich sounding. Additionally they are very flexible...more so than any other string we have played.

coreybox
04-08-2010, 04:16 PM
I haven't found them easier to bend... but they are the best sounding strings I've tried.

One thing to note, there sizes are skewed. There "mediums" are .12, while every other manufacture calls .13 mediums. Thus, there "mediums" will be easier to bend than others.

Besides that, I don't find them that bendable.

Strings - DR Sunbeams

They're great for bending...

Flyin' Brian
04-08-2010, 08:05 PM
When Zakk Wylde was asked about playing a 13 lb LP with 13 gauge strings held up by a metal chain instead of a strap he said "Eat steak, Lift weights, don't be a *****."

I'd dare him to walk up to Rev Billy and tell him he's a puss with his 8s

Cybercat
04-09-2010, 07:34 AM
(snip) what i learned to do was "cheat" on the G string by sliding up a half-step, then bending a half-step. done smoothly enough and incorporated with bending the other strings normally, you can play "regular" lead guitar on your acoustic and it'll work reasonably well. (snip) :aok

...This is the is the way to go, & it works great with 12s or 13s. For me it felt a bit weird at first, but you'll be doing it in your sleep in a week or three... & pretty soon no one will hear that you're 1/2 bending & 1/2 sliding, once you've got the hang of it.

Alternatively you can 'cheat' a different way : -
...replace the wound 3rd on a set of 12 or 12s with a plain third. I've used .024 with 12s, & .026 with 13s. Must admit, double string bends (B string 1/2 step, G string full step) felt a bit tough at first, but if you're playing every day, it soon becomes progressively easier, & after a while is 'normal'. Playing a Strat or Les Paul with 10's or 11's now almost feels like playing toys with rubber bands on them... :D

guitaradvice
08-22-2013, 06:40 AM
Dear All,

There are wonderful acoustic guitars to be played with 0.011 strings or even 0.010 although in the last case I would buy a 0.010 set en replace the 0.010 with a 0.011.

What you need is a light braced and small body guitar. There are even professional guitarist who play a Jumbo guitar with 0.010 strings, usually an istrument made specially for them.

Just visit a serious acoustic guitar shop and ask for a small body (not 3/4) guitar with light bracing. If you want to play electric style guitar on an acoustic do it! The options are there but you need a light braced guitar.

QuietInTheDark
08-22-2013, 06:47 AM
I use 11s. I have tried 10s but I loose too much of tone. 11s also tend to work better on smaller than a dread. Actually recording tends to work better on other than a dread too.

Edit: echo: hadn't seen the post above me. :)

guitaradvice
08-22-2013, 06:49 AM
If you search this on you tube "ROTOSOUND STRINGS & JULIE ELLISON - THE CAT AND THE BUTTERFLY" You can see how a jumbo sounds with 0.010 strings. They are however contact core (the core of string touches the saddle).

Rotosound as well as GHS make these contact core strings.


Best

guitaradvice
08-22-2013, 06:53 AM
Another advice would be to get a spider bridge dobro like resonator guitar and put 0.011 on them. I got great sounds like that.

TheoDog
08-22-2013, 06:54 AM
Guitaradvice makes a good point.

My initial comment is to just out your purse down and play the acoustic guitar.
The logical thing to do is play the guitar in a way that makes it sound its best instead of trying to apply a preconceived set of expectations to the individual instrument.
If guitar x sounds great with .12 and you can't get your bends in tune, then don't. Play the guitar the way it sounds best.

guitaradvice
08-22-2013, 06:59 AM
I would say this is the perfect acoustic set for electric like playing:

0.011- 0.015 - 0.022 - 0.030 -0.040 (or 36) 0.050

Try the brands "John Pearse" or "SIT (Stay In Tune) strings" or Newtone strings from England for this and use them on a small body (light braced guitar): perfect sound

"La bella golden alloy strings 0.010" are also a perfect set with more or less equal tension among all strings. This set has a 0.028 as third string which makes it even easier. I would replace the 0.010 in this set with a 0.011 though.


Use phospher bronze in stead of 80/20 bronze as the first might sound fuller on light gauges. La bella golden alloy is an exception to this general observation as this is a special 80/20 bronze string with nice sustain.

John Coloccia
08-22-2013, 07:12 AM
FWIW, I don't put heavier than .12s on acoustics anymore. Lots of additional stress for not a whole lot more sound unless all you do is strum open chords.

Martin FX strings are a bit more flexible, very bright sounding....nice for finger pickers. Generally, though, if you start playing a lot of acoustic, you'll start being able to bend a lot more. I don't know if it's even a matter of strength. It's just technique. Clearly, some bends are easier than others and sometimes you just have to slide, but the same can be said for electric guitar, I suppose. I went nearly 2 years without touching an electric...not on purpose. I was just following my interests. After a few months, it didn't feel much different than playing an electric.

guitararmy
08-22-2013, 07:21 AM
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/martin-fx675-custom-light-80-20-bronze-acoustic-guitar-strings (http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/martin-fx675-custom-light-80-20-bronze-acoustic-guitar-strings)

I recently put the same gauge Martin Lifespan 6050's on a Composite Acoustics dread and was surprised that the volume wasn't that much weaker. The bass side is similar to a regular set of lights.

Badfrog
08-22-2013, 12:31 PM
I had a great guitar instructor a while ago that played a jumbo Gibson and used light strings. Did that so he could do some bends and also so he could play all day without getting too tired (hands/fingers). He sounded awfully good to me.

mrpinter
08-22-2013, 02:09 PM
I had an unusual acoustic guitar that was built by Don Musser he called a "classical steel string". It was a classical sized body but with saddle and tuners for steel strings. I played very light Thomastik-Infeld classical steel strings (called Classic S Rope Cores), and they worked great on that guitar. When I sold that guitar and replaced it with another hand made instrument - an OM bodied acoustic - I naturally wanted it to work with extra light strings. First thing I did was to make up a custom set of Thomastiks of about .010 to a low E somewhere between .040 and .050. I even paid to have it set up for that extra light set. The tech told me he thought that was too lightweight to work on that guitar. He was right. I tried stepping up in thickness a little at a time, but it wasn't until I put on a set of T-I Plectrums in .012 - .059 gauge on it that the guitar seemed "happy". I've gotten used to the extra tension, and I love these strings. No way can you make most acoustics sound good with electric-weight strings, IMO, unless you have a very specialized guitar that was made for extra light strings. A parlor guitar? Maybe.

Seorie
08-22-2013, 02:24 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gd4uVwxsSHk

joeprs
08-22-2013, 04:46 PM
use some 13's and man up! :)

Nothing ruins a good acoustic like 11's or 10's. I play acoustic so much that I find my electrics too easy to play with 10's even 11's.
:dude

soulman77
08-22-2013, 04:54 PM
use some 13's and man up! :)

Nothing ruins a good acoustic like 11's or 10's. I play acoustic so much that I find my electrics too easy to play with 10's even 11's.

This. All my electrics have 12s on them and even those feel light after playing acoustoc 14s. If I pick up any electric with less than 11s I end up wayyyy over-bending ;-)

jcs
08-22-2013, 05:04 PM
You ever notice all of these acoustic guitars with damage from too heavy of strings?

I would try some type of hybrid electric/acoustic and play thru a quality amplifier if you want to use a 10 set.

I've had this discussion many times about heavy strings and so has my orthopedic doctor....he has seen MANY damaged hands on guitar players so be advised that hands can easily be damaged....I will be 55 and have enough arthritis issues and I don't want surgery....a lot of computer use lead to hand & arm problems as well in my case.

If necessary though, i would gradually move up to an 11 set and make sure the guitar is properly set up as well.

If you can't tolerate 11s for what you want/require in your playing style go back to a 10 set and use an amp.

I'm not much of a cowboy chord strummer either but I have one old Yamaha set up with 11s that sounds fine for cowboy chords!:phones

lp_bruce
08-22-2013, 09:20 PM
I had a great guitar instructor a while ago that played a jumbo Gibson and used light strings. Did that so he could do some bends and also so he could play all day without getting too tired (hands/fingers). He sounded awfully good to me.

Yep. Use the strings you want. I use 12's on my Carvin acoustic but 10's on my Ovation. I think they both sound good and don't think I'm less a man for playing with the strings I choose.

Peace,

Tom CT
08-22-2013, 09:43 PM
Heavy strings ≠ Manliness. Use the strings that help you to be a better guitarist.

guitaradvice
08-23-2013, 01:49 AM
Badfrog: "I had a great guitar instructor a while ago that played a jumbo Gibson and used light strings. Did that so he could do some bends and also so he could play all day without getting too tired (hands/fingers). He sounded awfully good to me."

Good point. If you have to play all day long it makes a difference. I can bend 13s very well for one or two songs but after that you get stifness in your hands that really hampers your ability to play musically. What gauge did he use on that Jumbo 0.011 or a 0.012 set?

Bluedano1
08-24-2013, 11:15 AM
I find that overall string tension varies by brand, even with identical (say, 12-53/54) gauging, and this really has an effect on fretting/bending/vibrato on an acoustic.

After trying out many acoustic phosphor bronze light gauge strings (12-53/ 54) over the years, D'Addarios and John Pearse Lights always seem to come out as the best 'tone with flexibiliy' strings I have used. Both are easy benders on my Martin D-1; the D'adds hold a bright, yet warm tone a long time, and the Pearse strings, though they mellow quickly, still have a very nice warmer tone with incredible sustain on the wound strings. The D'Adds are a great Light set, IMO, for those of us that play 50/50 electric guitar/acoustic gigs.

riffmeister
08-24-2013, 11:30 AM
Practice on an acoustic to build up your hand strength. It will take some time, be patient. Your calluses will thicken, too. And as Walter mentioned, 1/2 step bends on the G string.

joeprs
08-24-2013, 01:28 PM
Practice on an acoustic to build up your hand strength. It will take some time, be patient. Your calluses will thicken, too. And as Walter mentioned, 1/2 step bends on the G string.

+1 on this. I play my acoustic (.013-.056) every day, not so much for practice, but more for exercise. I can and do bends on it as well. When I play my DGT (.011's), I have to be careful I don't bend the notes sharp. When I play my other guitars with .009's or .010's, the strings feel like rubber bands.

bbrunskill
08-25-2013, 02:07 AM
Itís just technique - I can bend my e and b strings a full step easily with normal light acoustic strings. I can only go half a step on the wound g though.

Rich W
08-27-2013, 12:41 AM
I've tried light strings, just to experiment. Like the OP, I'm a bender.

As everyone has pointed out, there's the expected loss of tone.

But more important, lighter gauge strings can also mess up intonation up the neck. Use 10s on a guitar designed for 12s or 13s and there may not be good intonation at the 12th.

matchless
08-27-2013, 06:01 AM
playing a well set up acoustic is one of the best ways to raise your skill levels-similar difference between a piano and an organ. I have been playing more acoustic than strat lately- those 11's on the strat feel like 9's

snakestretcher
08-27-2013, 03:01 PM
"would like to add a good acoustic into my stable"

Why? Because you like the tone of an acoustic? You will not get anything resembling a good acoustic gtr sound with some pussified strings. If you like the sound of an acoustic gtr, get a good one and use "acoustic light-gauge" (.052-.012) strings. Play it like it's an acoustic gtr, not like it's a LP. Limit yourself to half-step bends, slide into notes your might normally bend into on an electric (listen to Paul Geremia). Or...have an acoustic that you can play SRV on and sounds like crap. your choice.

Much truth here. I always regarded an acoustic guitar and an electric as two different instruments which require different techniques in order to get the best from them.

Ramblin' Ghost
08-29-2013, 10:52 AM
A small bodied short scale acoustic with 11s. Like a Martin 000 or a gibson lg. you guys are nuts for demanding 12+ on every acoustic. Some bracing designs aren't meant for it. Sure they won't strum like a dreadnought with 13s, but it still sounds like an acoustic. You should be able to bend and play blues relatively easily on those. It will still demand you create a different style than your electric playing though. Such is the nature of the beast. Going down to 10s may be a little overkill though. It will get really plinky and thin.

jcs
08-29-2013, 11:34 PM
That's what I was trying to get across earlier....12s and 13s can cause damage to some acoustics.

I think 11s are a good happy medium and 12s are as big as I will ever go.

Can't argue that 13s can sound outstanding though!

Twitchey
08-30-2013, 12:03 AM
Randy - I use a Gibson LG0 (parlour size guitar) with 10's and an unwound G string for all the reasons you state. This thread is less useful without people posting clips BTW. I have a week off work from Monday and will endeavour to show what it sounds like.

crambone
08-30-2013, 07:56 AM
use some 13's and man up! :)

Nothing ruins a good acoustic like 11's or 10's. I play acoustic so much that I find my electrics too easy to play with 10's even 11's.

Agreed. I always use 13's on my Taylor and I find when I switch back to my LP with 10's I sometimes fret them out of tune!!!

Soapbarstrat
08-30-2013, 07:08 PM
Taller frets.

walterw
08-30-2013, 07:22 PM
Taller frets.
+1, taller frets make it easier to grab bigger strings for bending.

Soapbarstrat
08-30-2013, 11:57 PM
+1, taller frets make it easier to grab bigger strings for bending.

Might still hurt a little (going up a gauge or so in string size). But I have a video where Dan Erlewine is playing blues and bending quite nicely on a *bar" fretted TJ Thompson Acoustic and those frets tend to be around .050" high on average. Acoustics with your typical modern T head frets are very often around .037" high (maybe .040" high, if you're lucky), but man, on those plain upper strings, not much to get under for bends with those typical low frets. You hear the difference talked about so much for electrics, but not enough about acoustics.

Bobbofallenstar
08-31-2013, 03:46 AM
I just finished a 30 date acoustic tour with nothing but my Martin with .13's. The first week - the G string bend was killing me. By week 2 I had a new callous. I've been playing over 20 years and I just got a new callous.

If I put any smaller strings on it - it just doesn't carry the strumming so... Dig in!!