PDA

View Full Version : What amp is this?


Flatcat
04-19-2005, 05:09 PM
Hey people,

I'll shortly introduce myself. I'm from Belgium and I play in a punkrockband. I play a Gibson SG and in a couple of months I'll have a R7.
Amps: Brunetti XL R-EVO (check it out!) and Bogner Ubershall.

I'm looking for this sound:

It's very clean, some say it could be some kind of jcm800?

I especially like the intro sound and the palmmuted parts..

http://www.flatcatpunk.com/mp3/guitarsound.mp3

Hope you can help?

By the way, I might sell my uber (too much bass and gain anyway) and check out a boutique amp that can do good rock (old punk, ac/dc) and some more high gain stuff . Looking at Cornford, are they good for that?

Take care!

Flatcat
04-19-2005, 06:58 PM
bump!

please help me out people!

Norjef
04-19-2005, 07:14 PM
Sounds to me like new strings on treble PU of Tele or "Texas" Strat into Fender tweed-type amp mildly pushed.

Jeff

Flatcat
04-20-2005, 04:58 AM
Thanks for your reply Jeff!

So a bassman might be a good idea?

I was looking into this 59ltd bassman, sounds pretty good.

Any brand that can nail that ànd a higher gain tone?

Flatcat
04-20-2005, 04:38 PM
UP!

Come on tone people, show me your skills! :)

Swarty
04-20-2005, 11:19 PM
It sounds like a poorly recorded AC30 to me (maybe a Pod?).

Norjef
04-21-2005, 10:53 AM
Second channel (of 4) on my Egnater TOL 100 would nail that tone with single coils (either boosted or tone pot-slight rolloff). The Egnater has Channel 3 & 4 to do higher and higher gain. I think Rivera or Bogner Shiva could get it too. "IMHO" discaimer.

One more--the recorded player has very good time and touch. Jeff

el34power
04-21-2005, 10:59 AM
The JCM800 would be a good choice. A stupid question though. Can't you just roll back on the gain of the uber?

Flatcat
04-21-2005, 11:12 AM
No stupid questions..

Actually I'm looking for another amp then the uber.

My Brunetti sounds better for punkrock. Uber is ... metal.

It sounds really dark and bassy, and even the slightest amount of gain is still too heavy sounding due to the bass (settings on 2 or 3!!)

It has good leads though, but downtuned slow stuff does this amp justice.

So I'm looking for the amp that can do this tone, the new greenday sounds amazing too (love or hate it, he has a pretty decent sound).

Would a Divided by 13 be something that I'm looking for?

el34power
04-21-2005, 11:18 AM
Couldn't tell ya bou't the 13 but. What cab are you using?
Regardless, i really like the JCM800. That's were i am at now.
If you are not looking for sparkly clean..cleans or high...high gain.
The JCM800 is a winner (and cost less in body parts:D )

Norjef
04-21-2005, 11:20 AM
Welcome to the Jungle pal...Try as many amps as humanly and locationally possible...Your touch, approach and recording techniques have as much (OR MORE) to do with your desired tones than gear--
IMHO of course Jeff

Flatcat
04-21-2005, 11:26 AM
I know Jeff,

But I'm checking out what amp might fit me better then the uberschall.

It's virtually impossible for me to check out Aiken, Badcat, Divided by 13,... here (Belgium, Europe).

That's why I hope some people in here can help me out.

Nice to hear more people think this is a single coil recording, I'll check that out in our next recording.

Come to think of it, we always had too much gain, it sounds really messy. (mesa, soldano, ...)

That's why I'm looking at all those Fender/Marshall alike boutique amps.

Flatcat
04-21-2005, 03:48 PM
el34 power:

Cabs: Marshall 1960A slanted and a Brunetti V30 cab (4X12)

cameron
04-21-2005, 04:44 PM
An early 80s JCM 800 Marshall's probably a good starting point. That is a good guitar sound on the sample, and a good player. Single coil p'ups is probably right. Tele more likely than P-90s.

Where in Belgium are you, Flatcat? My old band played a few shows over there a couple of years ago.

John Phillips
04-21-2005, 05:54 PM
Sounds like a JCM800 to me, the single-channel MV model. FWIW, I'd say the less-fashionable horizontal-input version, they're tighter and slightly deeper-sounding ;). Hard to tell for sure on a recording though - there's a lot of digital artifacts on that too.

The sounds on the recent Green Day album are probably P90 + JCM800 - that's what's in the videos, and I don't see any reason to doubt it from the tone... which is fantastic :).

The really good news is that JCM800s are easy to get, quite cheap and almost bomb-proof for reliability. One of the truly great amps.

el34power
04-22-2005, 07:26 AM
Originally posted by John Phillips
Sounds like a JCM800 to me, the single-channel MV model. FWIW, I'd say the less-fashionable horizontal-input version, they're tighter and slightly deeper-sounding ;). Hard to tell for sure on a recording though - there's a lot of digital artifacts on that too.

The sounds on the recent Green Day album are probably P90 + JCM800 - that's what's in the videos, and I don't see any reason to doubt it from the tone... which is fantastic :).

The really good news is that JCM800s are easy to get, quite cheap and almost bomb-proof for reliability. One of the truly great amps.

here here! I'll drink to that..... I'll drink to anything:D

Flatcat
04-22-2005, 08:21 AM
Originally posted by cameron
[B

Where in Belgium are you, Flatcat? My old band played a few shows over there a couple of years ago. [/B]

I live near Bruges, but closer to the coast.

Moving to Ghent in half a year.

What style was your band and do you remember what city/venue you played?


To the others: thanks for your replys. The 800's you're talking about are probably the single channel ones?

cameron
04-22-2005, 11:48 AM
Originally posted by Flatcat
I live near Bruges, but closer to the coast.

Moving to Ghent in half a year.

What style was your band and do you remember what city/venue you played?


We visited Bruges, but didn't play there. We did play in Ghent, in a small bar/club, I forget the name.

The name of the band was Graveyard Slut. We played what we called "punk rock" but we didn't really fit any of the micro-classifications that European punk fans seem to obsess over. Most of the gigs we played in Belgium were with either The Agitators, or The Heartaches, or with both.

Flatcat
04-22-2005, 07:35 PM
Originally posted by cameron
We visited Bruges, but didn't play there. We did play in Ghent, in a small bar/club, I forget the name.

The name of the band was Graveyard Slut. We played what we called "punk rock" but we didn't really fit any of the micro-classifications that European punk fans seem to obsess over. Most of the gigs we played in Belgium were with either The Agitators, or The Heartaches, or with both.

I can resemble to that classification... It sucks. We play punkrock shows every week but never (almost never) play with bands like them. It's like fat/epitaph style punk is a different world than the 77 influenced bands.. Shouldn't be that way.. oh well.

Big chance the club you played in Ghent was the Frontline? (a street where dumb**** student jocks have their bars)

Still grateful to replyers!

cameron
04-23-2005, 04:05 AM
Originally posted by Flatcat
[B]I can resemble to that classification... It sucks. We play punkrock shows every week but never (almost never) play with bands like them. It's like fat/epitaph style punk is a different world than the 77 influenced bands.. Shouldn't be that way.. oh well.

Big chance the club you played in Ghent was the Frontline? (a street where dumb**** student jocks have their bars)

/B]

Frontline sounds familiar. That probably was the place. I think that was the second place we played in Belgium, after someplace called Lintfabriek.

I was amazed when we got to Europe at the amount of energy the kids put into the micro-taxonomy of punk rock. I'd never heard of "Street Punk", for example, but in Europe, whether one is "Street Punk" or not is very important. Here in NY we in the punk scene (there are actually many punk scenes in NY - the City has a population of nearly 10 million, remember - but they are not so much focused on terminology) just think of ourselves as playing rock and roll, but in Europe, it seems the term "rock and roll" refers strictly to bands that play some kind of 50s pastiche.

It's all rather confusing.

Flatcat
04-23-2005, 04:58 AM
Sure is..

Lintfabriek, cool place. We opened up for The Ataris and The Vandals there.

Going way off topic but:

The thing that sucks for European bands is that it's really hard to tour the states. Certainly being the 'average' punkrockband. Overhere they're like: hey it's American it must be good.

I guess it all has it's pro's and con's..

cameron
04-23-2005, 01:20 PM
Originally posted by Flatcat

The thing that sucks for European bands is that it's really hard to tour the states. Certainly being the 'average' punkrockband. Overhere they're like: hey it's American it must be good.

I guess it all has it's pro's and con's..

Relatively small American bands who couldn't make a living touring the States can turn a profit touring Europe. The main reason is that there's still an audience for rock music in Europe. Hip-hop totally rules in the States, the audiences for any music other than hip-hop are relatively tiny.

My brother is in Sick of It All; his band have not had to work day jobs since '92, and that's solely due to the European market. They tour the states, but profit little from it. Europe is where they make their money.

When my old band played Lintfabriek, near Antwerp, we opened for The Bellrays, from Los Angeles, who are one of the best rock bands currently touring. They rarely play NY. They probably play Antwerp more often than they make it to the East Coast of the US.

Flatcat
04-24-2005, 07:04 AM
haha yeah, as a matter of fact they're playing lintfabriek in May :)

Who's your brother? I hear from many touring US bands the same story.

cameron
04-24-2005, 08:00 PM
Originally posted by Flatcat


Who's your brother? I hear from many touring US bands the same story.

My brother is Armand, the drummer in SoiA.

jbow
04-24-2005, 08:42 PM
That sound's a lot like Jeremy Popoff of LIT. Here is an interview where he talks about his gear and his sound.




Artist Spotlight – Jeremy Popoff of Lit

by Lisa Sharken
Lit emerged in Orange County, California back in 1990, building up a strong local following after years on the club scene. With its 1997 debut album, Tripping The Light Fantastic, Lit scored big at college radio and then landed a deal with RCA Records. The group’s subsequent major label disc, A Place In The Sun was released two years later and generated several major hits with “My Own Worst Enemy,” “Miserable,” which featured Pamela Anderson in the video, and “ Ziplock.” 2001’s Atomic also charted successfully with “Lipstick & Bruises.”

Back with a new self-titled and self-produced fourth album that’s garnering rave reviews, GroundWire spoke with guitarist Jeremy Popoff to learn how he achieved his tones on this latest disc. We also picked his brain about his influences and main inspirations for playing guitar and writing songs.


Describe your studio rig.
I ran through a Morley A/B/Y box into two Marshall heads. I had three in the studio with me—a JMP 50 watt, and another JMP, and on some of the stuff I used an early-’70s Marshall® Super Bass head that’s just ugly sounding. It’s hideously thick and bottom-heavy, but it works blended with my other amps. I use it live a lot. I played through two Carvin Legacy cabinets that have 25-watt Celestion greenback speakers in them, and they sound great with my heads.

It was pretty much my straight-up, live rig—two heads and two cabinets. I had them sitting next to each other, not separated or in different rooms, and I just let them bleed together. We threw up some mics all over the place—hanging from the ceiling and in the corners—and moved them around until it sounded real.

For effects, I used my live pedalboard which is just an old-school row of stompbox pedals. I have the Morley® Bad Horse wah, which I really like a lot, the Boss® SD-1 Super Overdrive, PH-2 Phaser, DD-5 Digital delay, MXR® Phase 100, Digitech® Whammy—the original red one, Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor, and Boss TU-2 tuner.

My main guitars are Fender® Custom Shop Teles® which only have one pickup—the Seymour Duncan® Parallel Axis Original Trembucker™;and a volume knob. I love the Trembucker. I was turned on to it when we were making the A Place In The Sun record. Once I tried it, I had Fender® change all my guitars and put Trembuckers in them. I also have a couple of Guild® Bluesbirds which Seymour made me two custom Trembuckers for. He somehow fit it into the smaller case and it sounds awesome. Other than that, I also used the acoustic guitar from my living room.

Which pickups were originally in your main guitars? What impressed you most about the Trembucker?
When we were recording A Place In The Sun, I had a couple of Teles and Strats® which all had Fender® Lace Sensor™ pickups. I liked them and they worked for me live, but in the studio, they never really delivered what I was looking for. So I would generally not use my live guitars in the studio. I would use Les Pauls® or look for something that sounded good. Then Alex Perez at Fender loaned me a Strat with a Trembucker in it to try in the studio and see what I thought of that pickup. I plugged it in, and it was just awesome! The guitar sounded somewhere between a Strat and a Les Paul. It kind of scooped somewhere in the middle and had the characteristics of both guitars. I really loved how the pickup sounded, and I also loved how it looked. It was different. It was cool. I had a new guitar built with a Trembucker, and it sounded so good that I had all my other guitars equipped with them. After that, everything improved. My live sound improved, and I was able to use my own guitars in the studio, and they always sounded great. So I first used the Trembucker on A Place In the Sun, then on that tour, and I’ve been using it ever since.

How are your guitars set up and what type of picks do you prefer?
I like the action kind of low, but I play really hard. My right hand is just drilling the strings, so I should go to a heavier gauge, but I just like the standard set of Fender Super Bullet .010s. For picks, I use the .60 mm orange Dunlop® Tortex ones.

Which players have been most inspirational in developing your style, technique and tone?
There are so many. I was a huge Iron Maiden fan when I was a kid, and that was the first concert I ever saw. In fact, seeing that concert was probably the main reason I wanted to play guitar. I was also a big Judas Priest and Ozzy fan, but as a kid, I was never really good enough to play many of those songs, so I’d get frustrated. I’d watch Glenn Tipton play, then go in my room and try to play the same thing, and I’d just want to quit. But then I started getting more into songs and songwriting, and started to write my own songs. I couldn’t figure out other people’s songs, so I’d make up my own! Then as I got better, I started to appreciate so many different styles and players. I’ve never really been a huge fan of shredders, but I’m impressed by it, and then after about two minutes I need to hear something else. I need to be moved by more than just speed and tricks. I need to hear a song. Growing up, I was also a big George Lynch fan, then I got way into Hendrix as I got older, and there are a lot of new guitar players that I think are killer, like Chris Cheney from the Living End. He’s probably one of the best guitar players out there now, in my opinion. I love watching that guy play and hearing his records.

What else are you currently listening to?
I really dig that new Jet record a lot. I also like the Used, and A.F.I.—that guitar player, Markus Sopholese, is really awesome. He’s kind of a metal shredder. Brand New is also a great new band. Then the standard CDs that live in my CD changer all year round are Elvis Costello, Elton John, Def Leppard Pyromania, AC/DC, and Boston. Tom Scholz is another one of my favorite guitar players and I always forget to mention him! He was very influential on my playing because his work in Boston was probably the first example I heard of a guitar player whose riffs and solos were as melodic as the melody in the song. They almost become hooks themselves, which is what I’ve always tried to do. I’m more impressed when a guy can hit one note and give me goosebumps than hit a hundred in the same amount of time. Tom Scholz is rad like that.

Can you offer any advice to other players striving for an identifiable sound and style?
My advice would just be to practice, practice, practice. But honestly, I’m the worst guy for advice because I’ve gone against the rules. For me, it was more about the vibe and the attitude—just slinging your guitar low and going for the throat. That’s my deal. I’m not knowledgeable about theory and I’m not a technical player. I didn’t take lessons and I just do my thing. I do what inspires me—whatever makes me want to play guitar. I think that sometimes when you take lessons or try to emulate another player, you’re just going to sound like that person.

What tips can you suggest for becoming a better songwriter?
The best advice I can give is the more songs you write—no matter how stupid or lame they are—the more you do it, the better you get. I started looking at my favorite songwriters and learning who their favorite songwriters are, then I went backwards to see what makes everybody tick. Just find your own niche and go for it.



HTH...FWIW, I think you could get that sound with a JCM800 or 900 and a 4x12 wiith greenbacks

J

jbow
04-24-2005, 09:00 PM
Flatcat...

Who the hell is that? It's really catchy. Nevermind it didn't take long to Google it and come up with ...Alkaline Trio. I'll have to check them out.

J

jbow
04-24-2005, 09:48 PM
Found it...

Go here: http://www.alkalinetrio.com/mainsite.html and click on the "media" link. Turn on the light and click the gear link...

There you go... of course this doesn't really mean that he used this gear in the studio but probably he did.

J

cameron
04-24-2005, 11:40 PM
Originally posted by jbow
Found it...

Go here: http://www.alkalinetrio.com/mainsite.html and click on the "media" link. Turn on the light and click the gear link...


That has to be the worst website design I've ever seen.

Unspeakably bad.

Flatcat
04-25-2005, 06:54 PM
Ok,

We'll be recording our single next week.

I think I'll check out a tele into a jcm800 for the palmmuted verse. Maybe I'll ask my friend if I can use his Diezel VH4's second channel and let those two blend.

Opening up in the chorus with a les paul through either the rectifier or uberschall.

Last time we used three layers of guitar recording in the chorus and it came out quite messy and mixed too loud.

Less gain is more huh.. :)

cameron
04-25-2005, 08:38 PM
Originally posted by Flatcat

I think I'll check out a tele into a jcm800 for the palmmuted verse. Maybe I'll ask my friend if I can use his Diezel VH4's second channel and let those two blend.

Opening up in the chorus with a les paul through either the rectifier or uberschall.

Last time we used three layers of guitar recording in the chorus and it came out quite messy and mixed too loud.



Sounds like a plan. You might as well play the whole song through with each guitar, and then blend the tracks when you mix. Be careful with regard to phase cancellations, though; sometimes that kind of thing can turn two combined guitar tracks into mud.

Less gain is more huh.. :)

Yeah, generally less gain = more rock.