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View Full Version : Bone vs. Tusq as a nut material. Pros? Cons?


G'OlPeachPhan
05-18-2005, 12:47 PM
Particulary in regards to electric guitars... specifically and ES-335.

Thoughts? Comments? Suggestions?

Ron Thorn
05-18-2005, 09:59 PM
I love Tusq nuts.
The 6 open notes have a lot of brilliance and sustain. The other positive is that Tusq has slight self-lubricating properties which helps tuning stability on non-trem and trem guitars.
Ron

G'OlPeachPhan
05-19-2005, 08:05 AM
Hmm, that self-lubricating property is a cool plus that I was not aware of... It'd be nice to not have to use a pencil to lace the grooves with graphite every time I change my strings. Plus if the tone is great, the whole thing seems like a no-brainer.

Tonally, does tusq have even more brilliance and sustain than bone? I've never played a guitar with a tusq nut, but have an acoustic with a bone nut. If it does have more sustain and brilliance than bone even, that'd be PERFECT for what I'd like.

Ron Thorn
05-19-2005, 11:28 AM
I've found some bone nuts can have sustain issues from one string to the next. We're talking about a very natural product and consistancy is not the best.
While slotting a bone nut you can often "feel" soft spots as you cut into it. Tusq is very consistant, but I wouldn't say MORE brilliant than a high quality bone or fossilized nut...close though.

Ron

Rob DiStefano
05-22-2005, 11:22 AM
I prefer natural unbleached cow bone for most fretted instrument nuts. Recently I've used water buffalo horn - though I find it's fiber is a tad softer than bone, it does allow the strings to glide better through the cut slots.

Graphite tends to be too soft for my tastes, though I find Tusq hard plastic to be okay.

Of all the man-made nut materials, Corian is my fave - super dense and extremely uniform, and it comes in lotsa colors, and if you use 2" square kitchen counter top samples you can make yer own nuts for free.

YMMV.

Tone_Terrific
05-23-2005, 10:20 PM
Why do guitar players value brilliance and sustain on open strings? As charming as it may be, I find open strings to always sound more....open... regardless of nut type. Shouldn't we be finding ways to balance open and fretted tone?

Ron Thorn
05-23-2005, 10:29 PM
Originally posted by Tone_Terrific
Shouldn't we be finding ways to balance open and fretted tone?

That's called a zero fret ;) .

I should hope most fretted notes are brilliant with a lot of sustain. Achieving that with a nut is the challenge.
I've made nickel silver nuts to act as a zero fret, it's balanced with fretted notes...but tuning stability is compromised with trem work or heavy bends.

dave251
05-25-2005, 06:55 AM
Originally posted by Fret Tech
I prefer natural unbleached cow bone for most fretted instrument nuts. Recently I've used water buffalo horn - though I find it's fiber is a tad softer than bone, it does allow the strings to glide better through the cut slots.

Graphite tends to be too soft for my tastes, though I find Tusq hard plastic to be okay.

Of all the man-made nut materials, Corian is my fave - super dense and extremely uniform, and it comes in lotsa colors, and if you use 2" square kitchen counter top samples you can make yer own nuts for free.

YMMV.

I find myself agreeing totally with Rob...Although I've used natural "horn" only on request. Tusq is at the bottom of my list...just above the cheapest plastics. I find it to be "gummy" when filing the slots, and WAY overpriced.

Corian is VERY good, files evenly, and consistently, although not as hard as bone. I recently completed a nylon string guitar that used a piezo cable for the UST....corian was a bit too flexible, so I went back to bone...sounded way better. This is kind of opposite to common thought, but in this particular application, the bone was superior for pickup response over the Corian. So for the saddle application in my design, it will be bone.

Martin has used corian for years at the nut, with great results. They still continue to use micarta for saddles, which is another good material. It's just a touch harder to work than corian, and perhaps even a bit more difficult than bone. But it's more consistant than bone.....

If you're going to pay Tusq prices, use bone instead.

G'OlPeachPhan
05-25-2005, 07:34 AM
Thanks for all the help/suggestions guys. I knew I'd get the great info I was looking for here.

I will be going with either Corian or unbleached bone for the nut... I'm thinking of also having the graphite nut replaced on my PRS as well... the guitar has a stoptail, so there's really no reason (trem) to have a graphite nut, and a little more brilliance on the open strings is always a good thing.

I found a nice tech locally who's willing to sit down with me and teach me how to make nuts and install them, so I'll learn how to do it, I won't have to buy any tools, and the job should be "pro" the first time... He's only going to charge me $24 to do both guitars.

Does anyone have a good resource to get Corian on the net?

Rob DiStefano
05-25-2005, 01:47 PM
Originally posted by G'OlPeachPhan ...Does anyone have a good resource to get Corian on the net?

Home Depot Kitchen Counter Department :cool:

Stew-Mac used to carry Corian blanks, but www.lmii.com definitely has them.

brad347
06-19-2007, 09:47 AM
reviving an old thread.

I just had a reputable tech/luthier recommend that I let him put a TUSQ nut on my ES-347 instead of the bone I requested to replace the guitar's original brass nut (which I don't care for). I've always used bone and been happy. He says Tusq will be better. I'm not so sure. But he didn't really seem to give me any options.

This is an extremely reputable luthier that comes highly recommended.

For the record, the guitar is if anything a bit too bright for my tastes. The brass nut might have something to do with this but it's entirely more likely that it's a combination of that and the maple neck, ebony board, low-output humbuckers, RS kit, and brass center-block inserts (an ES347 anomaly) all put together.

I'm not expecting any miracles.

What do you think?

Evan Gluck
06-19-2007, 10:49 AM
Nice to know I am highly reccomended here Brad. As far as giving you no options that was not how the conversation seemed to me. I prefer Tusq particularly on Gibsons, but a well cut bone nut is certainly fine. As Ron said, bone has inconsistencies that can come up. Whatever you prefer is fine but I prefer the Tusq. Kind of wished you had called me back to express your concerns about my seeming rigidity on the topic but you seem to have chose a public forum. Not my favorite method of communication.
Hope to see you for your appointment.
Best, Evan @ New York Guitar Repair

brad347
06-19-2007, 10:52 AM
:eek: busted!

Not really "no options," that's not what I meant. More like "This is the best way."

Perhaps I should have chosen my words more carefully and said "The luthier seemed very confident in his position that Tusq was the way to go."

My apologies dude.

Evan Gluck
06-19-2007, 10:57 AM
No worries at all Brad LOL I was eating lunch and just was surfing the net and saw the post. Luthierie is a a funny thing a lot of us have preferences like Rob's use of Corian. Its nice to hear other folks opinions and think of new ideas. Never really noticed the "gummy" quality to the Tusq that was mentioned. I tend to polish the tusq up really well so it takes a nice shine to it.
Anyway we can talk about it when i see you. I refuse to use fossilized walrus nipples though!!!
Best, Evan

LaXu
06-19-2007, 11:37 AM
I still can't really find tone differences between various nut materials. One of my guitars had a plastic nut and I've replaced it with bone. Some other guitars have Graphtech or TusQ nuts and those work fine as well. What I did notice is that the bone/Graphtech/TusQ nuts do give a bit better tuning stability, possibly just plain plastic is too soft or something even when properly filed.

daddyo
06-20-2007, 07:41 AM
Is anyone familiar with Slip Stone that StewMac sells?

Boogie92801
06-20-2007, 01:29 PM
Have you ever heard anyone use the term "Bad to the Tusq!" - I didn't think so!

Rock Johnson
06-21-2007, 06:28 AM
Corian is VERY good, files evenly, and consistently, although not as hard as bone.
Martin has used corian for years at the nut, with great results. They still continue to use micarta for saddles, which is another good material. It's just a touch harder to work than corian, and perhaps even a bit more difficult than bone. But it's more consistant than bone.....


Gibson used Corian in the '50s for the nuts of their LP's. I believe the Gibson Custom Shop uses corian on their modern instruments.

I've got corian on mine, it sounds okay - just typical Gibson, is cut poorly.

Jef Bardsley
06-21-2007, 08:49 AM
Gibson used Corian in the '50s for the nuts of their LP's.
That would have been difficult.... Corian® was first produced in '65. :D

LZ_69
06-21-2007, 09:00 AM
That would have been difficult.... Corian® was first produced in '65. :D

I think he wanted to say nylon...

SkydogFan81
06-21-2007, 09:41 AM
I think he wanted to say nylon...

+1. I have Tusq nuts on my LPs and I like them...seems like better sustain and string clarity on cowboy chords etc.:dude

FRETSMOKE
06-21-2007, 10:18 AM
Hi, just thought i'd chime in on this topic. I recently had both a Tusq nut and string tree installed on my maple neck Strat, and i'm a fan. Sounds really comparable to bone. Plus here's a trick - there's a product called Nut Sauce that I bought, and this guitar now stays in tune like nobody's business. The combination of the two really make a difference, especially if you like to use your tremolo. A little " sauce " on the saddles, and in the string tree slots helps as well. A little goes a long way - it ain't cheap ! And no, I am not affiliated with either of these companies. Hope my comments helped somebody out there............... JIM :AOK

levelfrets
06-21-2007, 01:57 PM
Does anyone have a good resource to get Corian on the net?[/quote]

Go to Lowes or Depot and get a free sample of Corian countertop material. 1 piece will make several nuts or saddles.

Rosewood
06-21-2007, 06:56 PM
Have you ever heard anyone use the term "Bad to the Tusq!" - I didn't think so!
I don't know why that's funny, it just is.
Also I like unbleached bone and corian.

SarasotaSlim
06-21-2007, 08:12 PM
My buddy Ed Wright suggested I try a Tusq type nut for my strat so I did. It seems to hold up a bit better to the sawing of the wrapped strings from the wammy. The bone would start to buzz on the D string after it sawed through but so far the Tusq has lasted quite a bit longer. Also try dropping one of each type on a tile floor and listen to the sound they make when they hit. The old plasic elcheapos don't have much sound at all. The bone has a bit of a ring to it. The Tusq has a ponounced ring to it - almost a musical note that rings out. Don't know what this means to the over all tone or feel or whatever but just thought I'd share that info.

SarasotaSlim
06-21-2007, 08:15 PM
Oh yeah - how does the Corian compare to Tusq for string sawing wammy types?

Soapbarstrat
06-21-2007, 09:58 PM
- there's a product called Nut Sauce that I bought, and this guitar now stays in tune like nobody's business.

I can't get myself to buy that product (just too cute and goofy with the sticker and small amount of the product for the price), but the idea is sound. Instead, I use 'tri-flo' teflon lube and graphite/teflon brake caliper grease (down-side to that is it's black). A decent lube like this will help a whole lot with tuning stability AND wear resistance. There's other similar products aimed at guitar players. I have to wonder if they really are a "special blend" or something already available and put into fancy bottles and packages to appear to be something original.

I'm still torn between using nut materials that have self lubricating properties on their own, or using other materials and adding the lubrication from a bottle or tube. But the nut is the achilles heel of the guitar, so it needs some special attention if you want to make it work as well as possible.

I like corian. I can blow a nut and not feel like I wasted a couple dollars worth of material right there, which is how I feel if I blow a tusq nut. Tusq is often too bright for me.

Mike9
06-22-2007, 05:03 AM
Is anyone familiar with Slip Stone that StewMac sells?


I've made several nuts with Slip Stone (trade name: Delrin) and for trem guitars it's the slickest material I've used. It's self lubricating and really lets the guitar return to pitch with heavy whammy use. I'll use it for custom nuts, but for regular nut replacement jobs I use Tusq because it's already slotted and shaped. Slip Stone comes in blanks and requires all the work a bone, or corian black does.

daddyo
06-22-2007, 10:55 AM
Thanks, Mike.

Rock Johnson
06-22-2007, 11:14 AM
That would have been difficult.... Corian® was first produced in '65. :D

I stand corrected.

Rock Johnson
06-22-2007, 11:15 AM
I want to try an ivory nut. They just look cool. :D

MichaelK
06-22-2007, 11:41 AM
The only difference - if any - that you will HEAR will be when you play open strings. Obviously when you fret a string the nut is no longer in the equation.

My tech only changes the nut on electrics if he needs to, e.g. to change the height at which the strings rest. He says that if the stock nut on an electric guitar is not a problem, if the strings move freely and they are the right height, in most cases he doesn't hear much difference between tusq, bone, graphtek or plastic. He does not recommend swapping them out just for the material alone, but of course he'll do it if asked. When he does, he uses only bone. He says they have tried every possible material that can be used to make a nut in his shop, and bone is what he prefers.

He has also said there's no huge advantage to upgrading the nut on acoustics, but that you can hear a difference on the open strings.

fullerplast
06-22-2007, 01:26 PM
Also try dropping one of each type on a tile floor and listen to the sound they make when they hit. The old plasic elcheapos don't have much sound at all. The bone has a bit of a ring to it. The Tusq has a ponounced ring to it - almost a musical note that rings out.

Exactly! Even with bone blanks they will often sound different. I took a class with Dan Erlewine years ago and the first thing he said when cutting nuts is "first you gotta pick the blank". He pulled out a handfull of various blanks and had me listen to the various sounds when dropped on a hard surface. The higher the pitch, the higher the density and the closer to fret density you'll be. Every material sounds different, and bone is probably the most inconsistent between various blanks, but a good well-cut bone nut is hard to beat IMHO.

fullerplast
06-22-2007, 01:33 PM
The only difference - if any - that you will HEAR will be when you play open strings. Obviously when you fret a string the nut is no longer in the equation.

That certainly seems like it should be the case, but I'm not totally convinced. Try putting a couple of stacked popsicle sticks just in front of the nut and see if the tone of your fretted notes doesn't change....

There are things like the headstock angle and the weight of tuning pegs that shouldn't matter with fretted notes for the same reason, yet somehow they do. Also when you are using vibrato on a string, that string is sliding back and forth in the nut. Any frictional differences between materials will affect the feel and looseness of the string to some extent.

Granted, these are all second or third order nuances but there are lots of things on a guitar that are in that category. They all add up.

Ben Furman
07-01-2007, 01:40 PM
I use 'tri-flo' teflon lube....

Just to let everyone know, you can usually find Tri-Flow at your friendly neighborhood bicycle shop. One little black drip bottle should last a lifetime.

-Ben

Rockinrob86
10-30-2007, 06:28 PM
bringing back an old thread, I have some questions.

i am building a partsocaster that needs a nut. I am on a limited budget. I see at mojo musical supply that they have precut bone nuts. Would these suck, or would this be a good way to get this part done for cheap. I just ordered the body, and it wont be in for awhile, but I would like to get the guitar finished by christmas, so could I just glue one of these on, and if not could I take just the neck to a luthier and have them make a nut for it without the body?

daddyo
10-31-2007, 07:56 AM
OK. I cut a Slipstone (Delrin) nut for my Hipshot trem equiped Strat project. Yes it cuts fine and is great for the trem, but the open strings loose a bit of the brilliance I am used to from my nut boned Tele. I'm going to cut a bone nut lubricated with graphite and compare it.

Mike9
11-01-2007, 05:54 AM
If you really want that fret like quality Warmoth sells a nickel/silver nut blank made from the same alloy as frets. It's a bitch to cut, but open notes ring like a bell and sound like fretted ones.

Soapbarstrat
11-01-2007, 09:23 AM
I changed my mind about wanting maximum volume/sustain on open notes after listening to some of my recordings, where it was obvious the open notes were over-powering fretted notes on some chords.

Ben Furman
11-01-2007, 01:06 PM
If you really want that fret like quality Warmoth sells a nickel/silver nut blank made from the same alloy as frets. It's a bitch to cut, but open notes ring like a bell and sound like fretted ones.

Interesting! Thanks for the tip.

But what if you have stainless steel frets? ;) (No, really. Let's not go there.)

-Ben

Tone_Terrific
11-01-2007, 07:51 PM
I changed my mind about wanting maximum volume/sustain on open notes after listening to some of my recordings, where it was obvious the open notes were over-powering fretted notes on some chords.

Isn't this effect almost universal? I'd like to bring my fretted note UP to the level of the open one, but find the extra ring of open notes rather useful at times, so am hesitant about trying to damp the open string to fretted levels. too.

Seems to be a rather futile pursuit all around.

dynac0mp
10-16-2008, 03:44 PM
I have a Strat which I have screwed down the trem (essentially hard tail) and it has vintage style stamped steel saddles and a plastic nut.

I want a tad more brightness out of this guitar and I'm thinking to put in a bone nut, from what I've heard here, but what about the saddles? Does anyone have experience with a good replacement for the standard saddles?

Eagle1
10-17-2008, 02:54 AM
The Tusq nut is better than bone in all but life expectancy .
Tusq wares down with string changes and trem use quite quick .Even with this problem I would still chose it over bone every time.

Eagle1
10-17-2008, 02:57 AM
I have a Strat which I have screwed down the trem (essentially hard tail) and it has vintage style stamped steel saddles and a plastic nut.

I want a tad more brightness out of this guitar and I'm thinking to put in a bone nut, from what I've heard here, but what about the saddles? Does anyone have experience with a good replacement for the standard saddles?
Is the acoustic tone to your liking ?

dynac0mp
10-17-2008, 10:10 AM
Yes (well long story, but I have an Earvana nut in now and it 'sucked' some good tone out). I wouldn't mind punching up the mids a bit, but overall, I'm happy with the unplugged tone.

Chris Scott
10-17-2008, 12:32 PM
Hope I don't derail anything here, but two things:

First, I have found Delrin to be the best nut material for just about any instrument with a trem and/or where heavy note bending is happening - just my experience.

Second, a few posts back somebody mentioned a luthier was willing to show them how to make a nut - am I missing something here?

-I mean, being a nice guy is cool and all, but showing someone how to perform a real skilled procedure that takes years to master, that is part of your livelihood just doesn't make any sense to me...

Again, sorry for the dee-rail.

americananalog
10-17-2008, 12:40 PM
Yes (well long story, but I have an Earvana nut in now and it 'sucked' some good tone out). I wouldn't mind punching up the mids a bit, but overall, I'm happy with the unplugged tone.
Are you using the permanent Earvana nut, or the screw-on retrofit type?

Eagle1
10-17-2008, 02:14 PM
Yes (well long story, but I have an Earvana nut in now and it 'sucked' some good tone out). I wouldn't mind punching up the mids a bit, but overall, I'm happy with the unplugged tone.
If your acoustic sound is good you need to look elsewhere for the problem.
Amp ,cable ,pickups?

TooManyHobbies
10-17-2008, 02:36 PM
Are you using the permanent Earvana nut, or the screw-on retrofit type?

I have an Earvana put into my piece de resistance tonal quality build.. and i can unequivocally say that it's NOT sucking tone. This is the OEM style one.

csharp22
02-07-2009, 07:46 AM
Particulary in regards to electric guitars... specifically and ES-335. Thoughts? Comments? Suggestions?

No question: hands down, go with bone. Everything else is plastic by comparison. Go with bone, cut & fitted by a talented guitar tech will make you fall in love.

I have a 1981 Taylor 510 with bone nut & saddle. The tone that comes from this makes combo penetrates my soul.

Besides tone, the sustain you get from good, quality bone is incredible. Nice, even, balanced, and L O N G s u s t a i n :-)

fr8_trane
02-08-2009, 05:31 PM
Shouldn't we be finding ways to balance open and fretted tone?

God I hope not. I love using open strings to make certain chords or lines ring in a way you can't do with fretted notes. The guitar would be much more boring without the open string tone.

walterw
02-08-2009, 06:07 PM
...a few posts back somebody mentioned a luthier was willing to show them how to make a nut - am I missing something here?

-I mean, being a nice guy is cool and all, but showing someone how to perform a real skilled procedure that takes years to master, that is part of your livelihood just doesn't make any sense to me...

Again, sorry for the dee-rail.
i don't think showing a technique is that big of a deal; if it takes "years to master", it will take the person you're showing it to years to master as well.
what threw me was the statement that the guy would do two guitars for $24! if his time is that cheap to him, it makes me wonder about the quality of the work.

Tubevalvemaniac
10-24-2011, 04:13 AM
I have nothing than excellent experience with Tusq.
Recently changed bone nut to Tusq on Tele, have few other guitars fitted with it.
Tried to do opposite on Rain Song (originally with Tusq), replaced with bone and result was no improvement, although I could live with bone, too.
Still, on some guitars I kept bone and look no further.
If building from the scratch, I would probably choose Tusq.

ToneSter
10-26-2011, 02:32 PM
Have not read all the posts..................

No.1 unless you have a special gift or have spent (((((hours))))) in time and experimenting or "gear" that will show you on a graph, you will more than likely not even notice!

No.2 unless your style of playing uses a lot of open strings, it does not even matter!

No.3 Bone, Fossil/Ivory or MOP, the MOP will make the guitar a little brighter.

No. 4 If it does not have a tremolo Tusq nuts are not equal, no matter what they are selling in the text/company.

walterw
10-26-2011, 08:21 PM
#1 probably true

#2 as long as it's good enough material to stay in tune, then probably true as well

#3 i found ivory to be a little softer and sound a little mellower than bone, but this was nut and saddle on acoustics, and the saddle makes a real difference in tone. other than the occasional pricy mandolin, i have not messed with MOP as a nut material.

#4 if 1 and 2 are true, then this is false. tusq is not as hard as bone, but it works and sounds just fine as nut material.

ToneSter
10-27-2011, 01:24 AM
(No. 4 is fact)........though my wording should have been regardless tusq is not equal to bone, I do not mean miles apart by any means as I have installed and used many myself until I learned, for me, if it is for a none tremolo guitar it gets bone, period!

No. 2 (((This should be the main subject))) as very few players play a lot of open stings, so at this point it is what ever lights your candle, (((Does not matter))), sit down for 20min. practice like normal and you will find you answer.

Most lead players do not play a lot of open sting style, I myself about 20%

Rockledge
10-27-2011, 05:17 PM
That certainly seems like it should be the case, but I'm not totally convinced. Try putting a couple of stacked popsicle sticks just in front of the nut and see if the tone of your fretted notes doesn't change....

There are things like the headstock angle and the weight of tuning pegs that shouldn't matter with fretted notes for the same reason, yet somehow they do. Also when you are using vibrato on a string, that string is sliding back and forth in the nut. Any frictional differences between materials will affect the feel and looseness of the string to some extent.

Granted, these are all second or third order nuances but there are lots of things on a guitar that are in that category. They all add up.

The tone will obviously change, but not because of the materials makeup so much as because of how soft it is. Strings will dig into a popsicle stick and cause the string to mute against it.
I am thinking if you soaked the stick in laquor or something that would make the surface dense and cut it down to the same height as the nut with slots in it, the difference would be negligible.

The only material I have used that I found to be a significant difference was brass. Brass nuts are quite bright compared to other materials.

Barenik
06-15-2013, 11:33 AM
I'm absolutely agree.
I filmed a video to proof this thing, I just posted it, but I think that this could be another "right place" to talk about this thing and to inform you about the video.




http://youtu.be/exw_9re6P5s





.

Tone_Terrific
06-15-2013, 12:36 PM
I'm absolutely agree.
I filmed a video to proof this thing, I just posted it, but I think that this could be another "right place" to talk about this thing and to inform you about the video.




http://youtu.be/exw_9re6P5s





.
Old thread.^
It was aimed at nuts, not saddles.
The bone to bone test was interesting and the Martin seemed to be the most affected, per the recording. However, a bit of clarity may have been sacrificed in achieving greater thickness of tone and sustain. I don't know.:dunno

walterw
06-15-2013, 01:30 PM
Necro-thread!

As for the effect of nut material on fretted notes, i once did a quick test by using the "worst" material i could think of, a big ol' hunk of red rubber eraser.

I heard no difference in tone, sustain or feedback behavior of fretted notes.

Tone_Terrific
06-15-2013, 05:17 PM
Necro-thread!

As for the effect of nut material on fretted notes, i once did a quick test by using the "worst" material i could think of, a big ol' hunk of red rubber eraser.

I heard no difference in tone, sustain or feedback behavior of fretted notes.
I have tried and tried and...then some, to get the good populace to slide a round toothpick under the strings at the nut to simulate a wooden nut.
TRY things. Draw conclusions from the evidence in front of your own nose.:bonk

Ronsonic
06-17-2013, 08:48 AM
Necro-thread!

As for the effect of nut material on fretted notes, i once did a quick test by using the "worst" material i could think of, a big ol' hunk of red rubber eraser.

I heard no difference in tone, sustain or feedback behavior of fretted notes.

Y'know. Much as I trust your judgment and ear, I find my uncorroborated theories and unfounded prejudices to be far more appealing. So, I intend to cling to them.

EADGBE
06-19-2013, 01:46 AM
I changed a plastic nut on a Kramer Striker to a graphite one. The open strings now sound great. Before they were sort of dead sounding. I think bone would sound as good if not better than graphite.

treedroppings
12-12-2013, 06:44 PM
Most lead players do not play a lot of open sting style, I myself about 20%

I do a lot of those 'hammer offs' when playing lead so it would matter to me.

Plus the luthier's skill at cutting it, can make up for the small difference in tone,

with a difference in 'feel' , my firebird is getting the treatment now

fatcat87
12-13-2013, 08:18 AM
Both nuts are great.. I guessed for someone who use the tremelo a lot , he should go for graphtech nut as it allows the strings to glide more smoothly through the nut slots when the whammy bar is being used extensively