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jcmark611
01-28-2011, 10:32 AM
So, 14 years ago, when I was a dumb and frustrated 18 year old I tried my hand at college and then withdrew. Now here I am a 32 year old trying to better myself, got a GPA of 3.67 for my first semester back, feeling great about myself, until I got a letter explaining I was under academic probation!!!

Seriously, I am failing college for something from FOURTEEN YEARS ago. I called the records office and they said there is nothing I can do about it. I'll never be eligible for any scholarships or discounts for GPA for something from FOURTEEN YEARS ago.

WTF?!

EricPeterson
01-28-2011, 10:34 AM
Seriously? That seems absurd. That really sucks man. Maybe there is some way to petition or have some kind of review. Always worth a shot, trying sending a letter to the dean of your college/department and explain the situation, or at least a tenured professor. Maybe they will go to bat for you.

A-Bone
01-28-2011, 10:39 AM
So, 14 years ago, when I was a dumb and frustrated 18 year old I tried my hand at college and then withdrew. Now here I am a 32 year old trying to better myself, got a GPA of 3.67 for my first semester back, feeling great about myself, until I got a letter explaining I was under academic probation!!!

Seriously, I am failing college for something from FOURTEEN YEARS ago. I called the records office and they said there is nothing I can do about it. I'll never be eligible for any scholarships or discounts for GPA for something from FOURTEEN YEARS ago.

WTF?!

You should talk to the dean. Not that there is much they can or will do about it, but you might get the term of the probation to be shortened to maybe just the first year of your current instruction. It is not reasonable that the probation should extend beyond your first year back.

My mother had a sort of similar experience in grad school. She had gone to college at 18 and got married after two years there. She went back for the third year, but was too distracted by her marriage and ended up with a a 1.something GPA for that semester.

Flash forward to 20 years later. She graduated summa cum laude as a psych undergrad, but when she applied to grad school, the local school said they did not think she could attend because of her awful college grades from 20 or so year prior. She went to the academic dean, showed him her more recent transcripts and spoke to him about it, and he placed her on academic probation for her first year in grad school. Once she completed that year (with straight A's), he removed the academic probation.

coldfingaz
01-28-2011, 10:39 AM
So, 14 years ago, when I was a dumb and frustrated 18 year old I tried my hand at college and then withdrew. Now here I am a 32 year old trying to better myself, got a GPA of 3.67 for my first semester back, feeling great about myself, until I got a letter explaining I was under academic probation!!!

Seriously, I am failing college for something from FOURTEEN YEARS ago. I called the records office and they said there is nothing I can do about it. I'll never be eligible for any scholarships or discounts for GPA for something from FOURTEEN YEARS ago.

WTF?!


Switch schools. Wouldn't that resolve the problem? If they want to discourage returnees with this sort of vigor, screw 'em. Seriously, that is totally asinine.

thornie
01-28-2011, 10:40 AM
This happened to me as well. There was no way around it, I eventually just transferred to another school.

Polynitro
01-28-2011, 10:43 AM
switch schools

Phalanx200bc
01-28-2011, 10:46 AM
Talk about your past comin to haunt you!!!!!

Beauracracies are trapped in thier own world(s) no matter where you go.

klaetos
01-28-2011, 10:50 AM
So, 14 years ago, when I was a dumb and frustrated 18 year old I tried my hand at college and then withdrew. Now here I am a 32 year old trying to better myself, got a GPA of 3.67 for my first semester back, feeling great about myself, until I got a letter explaining I was under academic probation!!!

Seriously, I am failing college for something from FOURTEEN YEARS ago. I called the records office and they said there is nothing I can do about it. I'll never be eligible for any scholarships or discounts for GPA for something from FOURTEEN YEARS ago.

WTF?!

If you are at the same college this is true. In the same way that completed coursework in the past can be included towards completion of your current degree, bad grades pull forward as well. You may be able to petition the school to have these removed. Also, if they have a policy that doesn't allow credits to be used over a certain amount of years in the past, the same can be argued that this policy also applies to bad grades.

Talk to the college and read the student hand book. If all else fails, transfer to a different college, then you can transfer your completed credits in. Most colleges don't allow a transfer of course work for D or F classes anyway so in essence your good grades will transfer your bad grades will be ignored. On the other hand when you apply to a different college they will ask for your transcripts from all colleges attended. You will definitely want to add a letter of explanation on the bad grades and explain all of this to the enrollment coordinator.

jcmark611
01-28-2011, 10:51 AM
They did say I should have no problem if I keep these grades up for the next semester, which shouldn't be too difficult, but since I'm only getting a two year degree from this school I don't know if I'd have time to improve my GPA enough.

My plan is to earn a two year degree, take that plus my 8 years experience in my field, and find a job that allows me to earn a living while working towards completing a 4 year degree. I was also hoping to transfer to a school out of state in order to complete the degree.

bigdaddy
01-28-2011, 10:51 AM
Double Secret Probation?



rnVKkJFYkhg

klaetos
01-28-2011, 10:59 AM
They did say I should have no problem if I keep these grades up for the next semester, which shouldn't be too difficult, but since I'm only getting a two year degree from this school I don't know if I'd have time to improve my GPA enough.

My plan is to earn a two year degree, take that plus my 8 years experience in my field, and find a job that allows me to earn a living while working towards completing a 4 year degree. I was also hoping to transfer to a school out of state in order to complete the degree.

Depending on the 4 year degree you may or may not be able to transfer the credits from your 2 year degree into the 4 year degree. In that case, you would have to complete 6 years of school total for this plan (2 year plus additional 4 year degree). If you are planning 6 years of school you are probably better off just completing the 4 years degree first and then do 2-3 years in a Masters program.

A BA +MA is better then a AA (2 year degree)+BA. Check with the BA school you want to attend to see if the 2 year degree credits would count toward your BA/BS

MikeVB
01-28-2011, 11:06 AM
Better than Daniel Simpson Day.

Polynitro
01-28-2011, 11:10 AM
Thats why you should always drop classes. I let one slide once and it was too late to drop so I just failed it and retook it next semester and got an A. But the problem is you can replace the grade but the points dont go away. I had a 4.0 but after that F and a couple of Bs I could not get my GPA passed 3.7. :console

jcmark611
01-28-2011, 11:12 AM
Depending on the 4 year degree you may or may not be able to transfer the credits from your 2 year degree into the 4 year degree. In that case, you would have to complete 6 years of school total for this plan (2 year plus additional 4 year degree). If you are planning 6 years of school you are probably better off just completing the 4 years degree first and then do 2-3 years in a Masters program.

A BA +MA is better then a AA (2 year degree)+BA. Check with the BA school you want to attend to see if the 2 year degree credits would count toward your BA/BS

The school I am currently attending is a community college and doesn't offer many 4 year degrees. I've spoke with two different counselors about my plan and they both agreed my best option was to get a two year AA with a focus in business and then transfer. I know that with a couple of the in-state schools they will honor the AA and one school even offers a deal where someone who completes a two year degree at my school can transfer and still pay the same tuition that I was at the community college. The community college I am attending works very closely with the University of Kentucky.

Pedro58
01-28-2011, 11:19 AM
The school administration may offer you some mitigation, but they are not obligated to do so. This is essentially like "throwing yourself at the mercy of the court." You did what you did. Take your lumps. That's one way to look at it, and perhaps the better way. You can question the fairness of what they are "doing to you," but the truth is that they are being perfectly fair. Consider that there were other 18-year-olds that got better grades. Is it fair to diminish their success by erasing your failure? You knew the rules of the game, I assume? And you're on probation... Probation ends. So, knuckle down and get good grades from now on.

phoenix 7
01-28-2011, 11:21 AM
I called the records office and they said there is nothing I can do about it. I'll never be eligible for any scholarships or discounts for GPA for something from FOURTEEN YEARS ago.

WTF?!

Are you at the same school now that you attended 14 years ago? It sounds like, despite your 3.67 for last semester, your overall GPA is still low because they're factoring in your GPA from your earlier years. That's not unreasonable, especially if you're at the same school (or even a different one). Once you bring your GPA above a 2.0 or so, you should be taken off academic probation - you don't stay on it forever. That's how it works virtually everywhere.

I've read a lot of your threads in which you complain about your class, your professor, your assignments, etc. Frankly, it seems to me that you jump to a lot of very negative, unfounded conclusions about the way you're being treated.

coldfingaz
01-28-2011, 11:22 AM
The school I am currently attending is a community college and doesn't offer many 4 year degrees. I've spoke with two different counselors about my plan and they both agreed my best option was to get a two year AA with a focus in business and then transfer. I know that with a couple of the in-state schools they will honor the AA and one school even offers a deal where someone who completes a two year degree at my school can transfer and still pay the same tuition that I was at the community college. The community college I am attending works very closely with the University of Kentucky.

That's not a bad plan, but I would take as generic of courses as possible to hopefully ensure the school you transfer to accepts them all. I don't think it's usually much of an issue, but you may want to seek guidance from the registrar's office... they may have a pretty strong knowledge of what types of courses are easily transferable & which ones are an issue especially if you know which school you're planning to transfer to once you finish your AA.

kush06
01-28-2011, 11:29 AM
Same thing happened to me. I left school in 1990 and went back in 1999. I had to take a few bull$h1t classes to bring my GPA over a 2.0 and get off academic probation. I tried to get the classes taken off my record but to do that I would have lost the credits for my entire first 2 years, so I took my lumps. At the same school, at the same time, my girlfriend's sister who was in nearly the same situation as I was made up a sob story about how bad her life was at the time and got all her F's dropped while keeping the good grades. Total crap. :FM So I guess my point is, either deal with it, or have a pity party with the right administrator and you may get those classes dropped. yymv I guess.

jcmark611
01-28-2011, 11:34 AM
Are you at the same school now that you attended 14 years ago? It sounds like, despite your 3.67 for last semester, your overall GPA is still low because they're factoring in your GPA from your earlier years. That's not unreasonable, especially if you're at the same school (or even a different one). Once you bring your GPA above a 2.0 or so, you should be taken off academic probation - you don't stay on it forever. That's how it works virtually everywhere.

I've read a lot of your threads in which you complain about your class, your professor, your assignments, etc. Frankly, it seems to me that you jump to a lot of very negative, unfounded conclusions about the way you're being treated.

This is the same school.

I was just trying to figure out if what was going on in my classes was normal. I don't remember anything about my classes from 14 years ago, so I was just trying to figure out if my problems were normal or not. You never know if you don't ask.

TTripp
01-28-2011, 11:35 AM
Double Secret Probation?



rnVKkJFYkhg

That's what I love about The Pub. The minute I saw the thread title, I knew it would hit someone's brain the same way.

jcmark611
01-28-2011, 11:41 AM
That's what I love about The Pub. The minute I saw the thread title, I knew it would hit someone's brain the same way.

I was first read the letter I did wonder, "Is this double secret probation, cause that would be sweet."

phillygtr
01-28-2011, 11:53 AM
Thats why you should always drop classes. I let one slide once and it was too late to drop so I just failed it and retook it next semester and got an A. But the problem is you can replace the grade but the points dont go away. I had a 4.0 but after that F and a couple of Bs I could not get my GPA passed 3.7. :console

At my univ, when you retook the points were replaced by the new grade (i.e. old bad grade did affect your GPA), however the old grade still showed on your transcript (along with the new grade of course).

THebert
01-28-2011, 12:01 PM
Ask if you can have your prior record expunged.

lakehaus
01-28-2011, 12:16 PM
My blood alcohol content and grade point average were equal during my first year at LSU! It's funny that when I see the forum acronym "For What It's Worth" - FWIW - it reminds me of my first year report card!! I was invited not to return for a semester. And I didn't, for 10 years.

Discounting my first year, my GPA was 3.8. With, it is 2.87.

It sucks that us dopey party boys can't have the first year erased - but the fact is it happened, and is forever a part of our being. I had a great time, and have no regrets.

cruisemates
01-28-2011, 12:20 PM
Going back to school when you are older is great. It is so much easier when you aren't focused on all the wrong things.

I suggest you get to know one of your professors on a personal basis, especially if they really like something you do. They can pull strings sometimes.

But personally I admit I never "got" college standards. I have passed enough classes to have a degree, but I didn't have the right credits, and so on. Plus I just couldn't take another Spanish or Statistics class (both required at the time I went to ASU) to get a degree.

But you should stick with it, and getting to know the profressors worked for me several times. (I just didnt stick it out). I found them to be as fed up with such policies as you probably are... especially if you say you might just quit.

jcmark611
01-28-2011, 12:25 PM
Here is the funny, weird, odd thing about it. At the same time I totally screwed up my credit, and none of that appears on my credit score now.

That really seems weird when you think about it.

tiktok
01-28-2011, 12:34 PM
So, 14 years ago, when I was a dumb and frustrated 18 year old I tried my hand at college and then withdrew. Now here I am a 32 year old trying to better myself, got a GPA of 3.67 for my first semester back, feeling great about myself, until I got a letter explaining I was under academic probation!!!

Seriously, I am failing college for something from FOURTEEN YEARS ago. I called the records office and they said there is nothing I can do about it. I'll never be eligible for any scholarships or discounts for GPA for something from FOURTEEN YEARS ago.

WTF?!

Sounds par for the course--you bombed a semester, and in your next semester (the gap doesn't matter), you're on probation for a semester or two or whatever your school policy is, until you've proven that you're back on track. I'd be quite surprised if you're 'never' able to go off sco-pro if your grades stay good.

On the other hand--suppose you'd had good grades back then, but withdrew for personal reasons, you'd want credit for the good work you'd done 14 years earlier, right? It works both ways.

phoenix 7
01-28-2011, 12:35 PM
My blood alcohol content and grade point average were equal during my first year at LSU! It's funny that when I see the forum acronym "For What It's Worth" - FWIW - it reminds me of my first year report card!! I was invited not to return for a semester. And I didn't, for 10 years.

Discounting my first year, my GPA was 3.8. With, it is 2.87.

It sucks that us dopey party boys can't have the first year erased - but the fact is it happened, and is forever a part of our being. I had a great time, and have no regrets.

This is why I think a lot of kids should take a year or two off after high school before going to college. A lot of people need to party and also work a bit in the real world before they realize what college is for and are motivated and mature enough to do well academically. I know I would have screwed up royally if I had gone to college directly after high school. By the time I went to college when I was 21, I'd had my ass kicked in the real world a bit and was ready to kick some ass myself. My
first semester GPA was 4.0.

jcmark611
01-28-2011, 12:41 PM
Sounds par for the course--you bombed a semester, and in your next semester (the gap doesn't matter), you're on probation for a semester or two or whatever your school policy is, until you've proven that you're back on track. I'd be quite surprised if you're 'never' able to go off sco-pro if your grades stay good.

On the other hand--suppose you'd had good grades back then, but withdrew for personal reasons, you'd want credit for the good work you'd done 14 years earlier, right? It works both ways.

But I didn't even finish that first semester. I withdrew from school totally and went back 14 years later.

semi-hollowbody
01-28-2011, 01:52 PM
are they charging you the same tuition as 14 years ago?? I doubt it...funny how some things change and others dont...luckily educaiton in the good old usa has become useless...;)

RBfan
01-28-2011, 02:06 PM
I've been in your position exactly - it sucks, but that's how it is. Generally a college will reinstate financial aid for students on academic probation. Remeber that there's general academic probation, then there satisfactory academic progress which is specific to financial aid eligibility. I now work at a state university (yes I'm an employee of the state of Illinois, I probably owe you money).

Anyway, the academic progress thing is a federal rule, no getting around it. As others have said, with success in 2 semesters or so you will get out of academic probation & be eligible for aid again, assuming you are otherwise eligible. Yeah, transcripts are for life, which is, yes, a little different from credit scores. Yes, you can transfer, but you will need to provide transcripts - if you don't, you'll be in worse shape if it comes to light you had previous college experience & lied about it.

Lastly, I'd say that leaving school (which may be different than offically withdrawing from courses, btw) & having to deal with academic probation is much more common than you might think. As long as you persevere & get better grades, you'll be fine, not really anything to be ashamed of (or particularly upset about either - but I do know how it feels).

Don't hesitate to contact me directly about this - I'd be glad to offer help. Not really that big a deal, happen quite a lot.

Tom

ChopsJackson
01-28-2011, 02:22 PM
I graduated from college in 86 with a 2.017 GPA

Fourteen years later I got my masters from the same college with a GPA of 3.80

Since it's the same college, the old crappy grades are on the same transcript.There isn't even a dividing line, they run right into each other. A,A,A,A,...right into W,I,C,D, FX, W... (basically every letter in the alphabet except A or B)

It sucks to have the crappy grades, but at least I have the masters on top now and there are a lot of years in between.

Before that, I would have been wiser to pull my d*** out in a job interview rather than handing over those transcripts.

stratzrus
01-28-2011, 02:37 PM
I keep telling my kids that what they do academically in their freshman year matters, but sometimes I feel like I'm just talking to myself.

jcmark611
01-28-2011, 02:54 PM
Wait? This could effect my financial aid?

Umm.... okay, now I'm upset.

zekmoe
01-28-2011, 02:56 PM
I agree with the switch schools advice. Unless you're going to Harvard, the college you go to means NOTHING on 99.99999999% of resume's or job interviews.

RBfan
01-28-2011, 03:00 PM
It could affect financial aid. Ask how your school handles academic progress issues. You may only need to formally appeal (if you haven't already) while you're in a probationary status & that's it. I work at school that still awards aid for students on academic probation.

Sorry if I made things worse, not my intent at all.

T

jcmark611
01-28-2011, 03:30 PM
It could affect financial aid. Ask how your school handles academic progress issues. You may only need to formally appeal (if you haven't already) while you're in a probationary status & that's it. I work at school that still awards aid for students on academic probation.

Sorry if I made things worse, not my intent at all.

T

Oh no, you didn't. Just kinda shocked that something I did 14 years ago (that wasn't major crime) would have this big effect on my life now.

phoenix 7
01-28-2011, 03:35 PM
It could affect financial aid. Ask how your school handles academic progress issues. You may only need to formally appeal (if you haven't already) while you're in a probationary status & that's it. I work at school that still awards aid for students on academic probation.

Sorry if I made things worse, not my intent at all.

T

Oh no, you didn't. Just kinda shocked that something I did 14 years ago (that wasn't major crime) would have this big effect on my life now.

It's worth keeping in mind that the school doesn't have to give you money - it's a gift. But I imagine the financial aid office will take into consideration that your bad grades are from years ago and don't reflect who you are now. Of course, they'll expect you to prove that.

stratzrus
01-28-2011, 04:58 PM
Oh no, you didn't. Just kinda shocked that something I did 14 years ago (that wasn't major crime) would have this big effect on my life now.But that's how it is.

Parents need to teach their kids that every screw up has a price.

The people who play to win keep their shoulder to the plow right out of the gate and never let up.

Polynitro
01-28-2011, 05:36 PM
But I didn't even finish that first semester. I withdrew from school totally and went back 14 years later.

So basically all this could have been avoided by simply telling each professor you were dropping the class. Even if its beyond the add/drop period they can give you a W or I instead of an F

A-Bone
01-28-2011, 05:40 PM
So basically all this could have been avoided by simply telling each professor you were dropping the class. Even if its beyond the add/drop period they can give you a W or I instead of an F

However, if it is an "I" it can turn into an "F" if it is not made up within a reasonable period (often the next semester).

I found this out the hard way as an undergrad. I had to drop out of classes for a semester due to personal reasons and missed withdrawing from one of them. When I subsequently requested my transcripts to transfer to another school, there was that lone F among my grades.

It followed me all the way to my law school application and admissions.

Blindspot
01-28-2011, 05:43 PM
Do you have any money? If so, have a casual conversation with the Director of Alumni Giving and tell him how much it saddens you that you will have to look for a new institution at which to complete your degree and become a generous alumni, simply because their institution is unable to adjust your transcript or status for grades from 14 years ago.

Then light a Cuban cigar with a $100 bill and have a chauffeured Rolls Royce pick you up and drive away.

Polynitro
01-28-2011, 05:46 PM
oh didnt know that about the I. I got an F once in Eglish112, I was more than halfway done with the class and getting an A as always but then I wrote a huge paper but somehow I picked the wrong topic, I was so pissed I just stopped going and got an F. Another thing I learned from that is if you drop or fail a class 3 times (I dropped eng112 twice) you have to get the dean to sign off on letting you in the class. Even if you drop which I figured you could do all you want but they said the academic penalties was because state schools are heavily funded by tax money even when you dont get financial aid.

However, if it is an "I" it can turn into an "F" if it is not made up within a reasonable period (often the next semester).

I found this out the hard way as an undergrad. I had to drop out of classes for a semester due to personal reasons and missed withdrawing from one of them. When I subsequently requested my transcripts to transfer to another school, there was that lone F among my grades.

It followed me all the way to my law school application and admissions.

sundaypunch
01-28-2011, 05:58 PM
The school I am currently attending is a community college and doesn't offer many 4 year degrees. I've spoke with two different counselors about my plan and they both agreed my best option was to get a two year AA with a focus in business and then transfer. I know that with a couple of the in-state schools they will honor the AA and one school even offers a deal where someone who completes a two year degree at my school can transfer and still pay the same tuition that I was at the community college. The community college I am attending works very closely with the University of Kentucky.

Make sure you discuss the details with a person at the university you plan to attend. I teach at a university. I find that many students are given bad information by their CC. It sounds like you probably have already done this.

We have articulation agreements with many schools and take transfer students directly into many of our programs. I have dealt with many students that were told "no problem, our 2-yr. degree will transfer right into that program" when it doesn't. They are not happy when they find out that they need to retake courses or take additional courses to get into the bachelor degree of their choice.

As for academic probation, it's kind of like getting an infraction here. No one likes it but it has no effect on you if you get your act together. Assuming that you get good grades you aren't going to be in any danger.

jcmark611
01-28-2011, 08:09 PM
Do you have any money? If so, have a casual conversation with the Director of Alumni Giving and tell him how much it saddens you that you will have to look for a new institution at which to complete your degree and become a generous alumni, simply because their institution is unable to adjust your transcript or status for grades from 14 years ago.

Then light a Cuban cigar with a $100 bill and have a chauffeured Rolls Royce pick you up and drive away.

Funny you say that....

There is a building currently under construction at the University my college is closely affiliated with that has my cousin's name on it.

screamtone
01-28-2011, 08:33 PM
Funny you say that....

There is a building currently under construction at the University my college is closely affiliated with that has my cousin's name on it.

Hey-

Are you going to LCC in Lexington? When I went back to school at about the same age you are, I had a similar situation at JCC (the Louisville version of LCC). I had one semester of F's that ruined my GPA because I went on tour and didn't withdraw from my classes. If you don't have any credits that you're still trying to use, you might be able to declare academic bankruptcy and start your GPA over from scratch after a semester or two of good grades. I did this, and it took me a little while to get the financial aid situation worked out, but I eventually did. If the KCTCS staff in Lex is anything like they are in Louisville, it will take some work to find someone in academic advising that can help you, but it's totally possible. PM or email me if you like. HTH.

screamtone
01-28-2011, 08:37 PM
From the KCTCS Catalog:

Readmission after Two or More Years: Academic Bankruptcy

A student who has been readmitted after having remained out of a KCTCS College for a period of two or more years and who has completed at least 12 credit hours in non-developmental and non-remedial courses with a grade point average of 2.0 or better after readmission, may choose to have his/her previous KCTCS course work removed from the computation of the grade point average. This procedure is commonly called "academic bankruptcy."

A student who declares academic bankruptcy will continue to receive credit for those courses in which a grade of A, B, C, D, or P was earned prior to readmission without including those grades in the GPA computation. A student who has completed a credential and re-enrolls may not apply the academic bankruptcy rule to courses taken for the credential already completed.

Dave Shoop
01-28-2011, 08:42 PM
I don't understand why you wouldn't be held accountable for the grades if you were using the credits of those classes years ago toward graduation. That's what you got. If you were taking the classes over and got better grades I can see the complaint. Am I missing something ?

screamtone
01-28-2011, 08:46 PM
I don't understand why you wouldn't be held accountable for the grades if you were using the credits of those classes years ago toward graduation. That's what you got. If you were taking the classes over and got better grades I can see the complaint. Am I missing something ?

He only went one semester and didn't finish any classes. Therefore, no credits (as I understand it).

Dave Shoop
01-28-2011, 08:52 PM
hmmm I didn't read him as saying he didn't complete any grading period. I just read that he withdrew. I "withdrew" from college after 3 years. If no grade was posted I agree I don't see how he'd have the problem. If he just quit going to classes and was given grades I guess it would be different. I guess I'll read thru this again for a detail I've missed.

Polynitro
01-28-2011, 09:19 PM
I don't understand why you wouldn't be held accountable for the grades if you were using the credits of those classes years ago toward graduation. That's what you got. If you were taking the classes over and got better grades I can see the complaint. Am I missing something ?

he went 1 semester then stopped going. That means he didtn (officially)drop out but failed all the classes. You can take them again and get a better letter grade but the GPA will always be farked.

jcmark611
01-28-2011, 09:19 PM
I am fairly sure I withdrew, therefore not completing any classes. My memory of events in those days is a little fuzzy.

I'll be going to an adviser on Monday to see if they can help.

Polynitro
01-28-2011, 09:22 PM
depends when in the semester you withdrew. And if you dont tell your Professors they will fail you if you just stop showing up.

jcmark611
01-28-2011, 09:24 PM
depends when in the semester you withdrew. And if you dont tell your Professors they will fail you if you just stop showing up.

I'm fairly sure all I did was go to the financial aid office to have my money refunded. I guess you have to tell professors you are out too?

Polynitro
01-28-2011, 09:33 PM
I guess you have to tell professors you are out too?

Yes, they get pissed when people just stop going and dont tell them. They will fail you. Im pretty sure they have to fail you after a certain date.

screamtone
01-28-2011, 10:02 PM
You can take them again and get a better letter grade but the GPA will always be farked.

Not if he can get the academic bankruptcy thing going... Did the same thing in what I'm pretty sure is the same community college system as to OP.... 3.6 and graduated with high distinction.

jcmark611
01-28-2011, 11:30 PM
Not if he can get the academic bankruptcy thing going... Did the same thing in what I'm pretty sure is the same community college system as to OP.... 3.6 and graduated with high distinction.


I'll try that then. Thank you.

stratzrus
01-29-2011, 01:48 AM
Unless you're going to Harvard, the college you go to means NOTHING on 99.99999999% of resume's or job interviews.This is simply not true.

Any Ivy League school, major university, or specialty school (Julliard, Berklee, etc.) will make an impression in an interview that your local community college will not...particularly in today's tight job market.

Warnis
01-29-2011, 06:47 AM
So, 14 years ago, when I was a dumb and frustrated 18 year old I tried my hand at college and then withdrew. Now here I am a 32 year old trying to better myself, got a GPA of 3.67 for my first semester back, feeling great about myself, until I got a letter explaining I was under academic probation!!!

Seriously, I am failing college for something from FOURTEEN YEARS ago. I called the records office and they said there is nothing I can do about it. I'll never be eligible for any scholarships or discounts for GPA for something from FOURTEEN YEARS ago.

WTF?!

that is false. you appeal to the financial Aid or declare academic bankruptcy or wait one semester and average your GPA. You should read your schools policy on minimum GPA and credits. I know that, I have gone through this process 3x at 3 different colleges... just 2 weeks ago I had explained to my school their policy on transfer credits and minimum GPA and was awarded $1050 grant. The "academic probation" is like a default setting on a computer.

RBfan
01-29-2011, 11:46 AM
Academic Bankruptcy is a new one on me, but it sounds like a great way to help students get back on track & might be just what the OP needs. As I understand it from the above exerpts, they basically allow you to have credit for completing any coursework you may have passed, but none of it counts in the GPA calculation. Pretty cool.

Also, FWIW, withdrawing from school is a process in which you talk to an academic advisor or someone else in the registration/records office, complete paperwork (maybe 'leave of absence' application, etc.), then officially withdraw from the school. It has nothing to do with talking to professors - they'll get the message.

Again, this happens all the time. Good luck to the OP. Just be honest about everything - they've obviously seen this before a lot since they now have a policy catering to students in this position.

T

ChopsJackson
01-29-2011, 12:25 PM
This is simply not true.

Any Ivy League school, major university, or specialty school (Julliard, Berklee, etc.) will make an impression in an interview that your local community college will not...particularly in today's tight job market.

I took four graduate courses at Northwestern and several courses at community colleges. Many of the community college kids weren't from wealthy families but were just as bright as the Northwestern kids.
Companies that only hire from the "best" schools seem to be those uptight
corporate factories incapable of thinking outside the box and are often
miserable places to work, filled with cut-throat people.

rongtr
01-29-2011, 12:29 PM
Good observation, Chops- I came from a community college background for my first two years of college- and the quality of instruction I received there was equal to my junior and senior year.

Brian D
01-29-2011, 04:15 PM
This is what I learned from my similar experience:

There are two ways your past record can affect your present situation: GPA and Completion Rate. Not only are you required to maintain a certain GPA, but you also have to complete a certain percentage of the classes that you attempt. It sounds to me like you may be dealing with the latter, since you completely withdrew. Wait, you DID withdraw -- right? You didn't just quit going to classes? If you didn't officially withdraw, you would end up with "F"s for all of your classes and take that hit against your GPA (on top of the hit to your completion rate). I did that once, and I paid for it.

No matter the situation, you should be able to talk to the Dean, write a letter of intent (I'm being a good boy now and intend to accomplish these goals), and if/when the Dean signs off on it you should qualify for financial aid again. They should sign it without any problem if you're doing as well as you say. You'll have to repeat this process each semester until you get your numbers up or graduate.

I'm not familiar with Academic Bankruptcy, but I'd definitely look into it as well.

Dave Shoop
01-29-2011, 04:33 PM
"Companies that only hire from the "best" schools seem to be those uptight
corporate factories incapable of thinking outside the box and are often
miserable places to work, filled with cut-throat people."

I just love it when then shoe is on the other foot and the same stereo type generalizations are made.

I bet you can find a business that hires the "average" school graduates that is also uptight, a miserable place to work filled with people who can't think out of the box while they are cutting each others throats so to speak.

JamesT
01-29-2011, 09:52 PM
Myu brother went through that, but when he went to college second time he never tolad about first 2 colleges he had to start over as freshman. but his record did not catch up with him, still go talk to them.

Flyin' Brian
01-30-2011, 08:17 AM
Bureaucratic BS at its finest

Baloney
01-30-2011, 09:26 AM
It just means you need to work harder to overcome the crap of the past. Man up and quit whining about the crap you got handed from the ignorant rules and show them youre a better person now. Good job on the GPA keep up the good work!!!

Polynitro
01-30-2011, 09:29 AM
yup most of undergrad is just bullshit you have to jump through. There's nothng difficult or mentally challenging its just a big PITA.

jcmark611
01-31-2011, 11:28 AM
I just spoke with a very helpful (and very cute) woman in records and she told me I could take academic bankruptcy at the end of this semster and my grades from 14 years ago would be wiped from the face of the Earth.

Thanks everyone.

Fred Farkus
01-31-2011, 11:32 AM
Remember what they used to say about your "permanent record"? Hmmm?... :roll

Sorry- just kidding... Bureaucracies completely suck. Have you tried talking to a guidance counselor about it? (Sorry if this was already mentioned in the thread- I didn't read all of it.)

djem
01-31-2011, 11:34 AM
Switch schools. Wouldn't that resolve the problem? If they want to discourage returnees with this sort of vigor, screw 'em. Seriously, that is totally asinine.

Yup.

You'd think that they would mention the probation when you enrolled your second time around.

djem
01-31-2011, 11:40 AM
yup most of undergrad is just bullshit you have to jump through. There's nothng difficult or mentally challenging its just a big PITA.

I think level of difficulty depends on which faculty you belong to. There's a big difference between a general arts program vs. engineering program in university.

ButI do agree with there being a lot of BS and politics within any faculty. It's just another business.