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View Full Version : Who played the best Doc Holiday?


Dillow4092
03-23-2011, 06:21 AM
I liked the movie Wyatt Earp much better than Tombstone, but Val Kilmer smoked Dennis Quaid as Doc Holiday.

mbargav
03-23-2011, 06:21 AM
Agreed. I'm not a big fan of Tombstone, but Kilmer just owned that role and every scene he's in is incredible. Gold standard for Doc Holiday.

Jan Folkson
03-23-2011, 06:31 AM
I'm your huckleberry

tonefinger
03-23-2011, 06:36 AM
I loved Tombstone, mainly because of Kilmers performance. He owned that movie.

Thwap
03-23-2011, 06:37 AM
Kilmer by a mile.

Peeb
03-23-2011, 06:37 AM
I loved Tombstone, mainly because of Kilmers performance. He owned that movie.
:dude

mbargav
03-23-2011, 06:38 AM
I'm your huckleberry

:nono Hucklebearer, you mean.


.... just givin' ya grief. Everytime there's a Tombstone discussion, there's always a side discussion on whether Doc says "huckleberry" or "hucklebearer".

tonefinger
03-23-2011, 06:44 AM
I believe it's "huckleberry".

mbargav
03-23-2011, 06:46 AM
I believe it's "huckleberry".

Hucklebearer was 19th century slang for "pall bearer," so it'd actually make more sense if he said "I'm your hucklebearer." But apparently huckleberry was slang for hucklebearer, so who knows!

TTripp
03-23-2011, 06:47 AM
:nono Hucklebearer, you mean.


.... just givin' ya grief. Everytime there's a Tombstone discussion, there's always a side discussion on whether Doc says "huckleberry" or "hucklebearer".

Well, let's get started then:

http://home.earthlink.net/~knuthco1/Itemsofinterest1/huckleberrysource.htm

"Huckleberry" was commonly used in the 1800's in conjunction with "persimmon" as a small unit of measure. "I'm a huckleberry over your persimmon" meant "I'm just a bit better than you." As a result, "huckleberry" came to denote idiomatically two things. First, it denoted a small unit of measure, a "tad," as it were, and a person who was a huckleberry could be a small, unimportant person--usually expressed ironically in mock self-depreciation. The second and more common usage came to mean, in the words of the "Dictionary of American Slang: Second Supplemented Edition" (Crowell, 1975):

"A man; specif., the exact kind of man needed for a particular purpose. 1936: "Well, I'm your huckleberry, Mr. Haney." Tully, "Bruiser," 37. Since 1880, archaic.

The "Historical Dictionary of American Slang" which is a multivolume work, has about a third of a column of citations documenting this meaning all through the latter 19th century.
So "I'm your huckleberry" means "I'm just the man you're looking for!"

FenderBigot
03-23-2011, 06:50 AM
Tombstone was a good movie, but it was a bit over the top and campy. I loved Kilmer's portrayal of Holiday, but it was a little "hamm'd up" if you ask me. Quiad's Holiday was probably a little more accurate as the Wyatt Earp movie was more "bio pic" and Tombstone was more glamour. Just my 2 cents.

Twangzilla
03-23-2011, 06:51 AM
"You're a daisy if you do!"

The Golden Boy
03-23-2011, 06:55 AM
You're a daisy if you do.


Edit.

Ummm...


Why Johnny Ringo, you look like somebody just walked over your grave...

Twangzilla
03-23-2011, 06:57 AM
You're a daisy if you do.

That's what I said.

DWB1960
03-23-2011, 07:08 AM
Kilmer hands down. And somewhere on the web is a quote from Kilmer saying that the screenplay stated hucklebearer.

Me and my son can quote that Ringo/Holliday scene to a tee.

Redlined
03-23-2011, 07:09 AM
I loved Tombstone, mainly because of Kilmers performance. He owned that movie.

I agree, Kilmer by a landslide. Honestly, there were some really great characters in Tombstone, Doc Holiday wouldn't have been nearly the same without the great Johnny Ringo scenes, but really a great cast all around.

vkennedy
03-23-2011, 07:43 AM
Victor Mature in My Darling Clementine.

A-Bone
03-23-2011, 08:10 AM
Victor Mature in My Darling Clementine.

My first thought, as well.

Mike K
03-23-2011, 08:12 AM
Who played the best Doc Holiday?

Kirk Douglas

SideBMusic
03-23-2011, 08:26 AM
Count me in for Kilmer. One of the most outstanding roles I have ever seen.

snorkey
03-23-2011, 08:34 AM
Kilmer gets my vote!!

jtm622
03-23-2011, 08:40 AM
Myron Healy by a mile...

Just as Guy Madison was a zero without Andy Devine, Hugh O'Brien was a zero without Myron Healy...


:)

DWB1960
03-23-2011, 09:20 AM
One of the greatest scenes in the history of Westerns.

KfbAFgD2mLo

speedobreedo
03-23-2011, 09:23 AM
First thought was definitely Victor Mature in My Darling Clementine although Kilmer was entertaining

TNJ
03-23-2011, 09:24 AM
Ice Man FTW!

S/
j

robbinsteele
03-23-2011, 09:24 AM
"i have two guns,one fuh each of ya".. man how did he come up with the perfect line every time? incredible....on the other hand,just watched mr.kilmer in macgruber..whew what a stinker

newking70
03-23-2011, 09:26 AM
this brings me to tears everytime i watch it... :cry:


5v2ZBqjZyjA

DWB1960
03-23-2011, 09:27 AM
this brings me to tears everytime i watch it... :cry:


5v2ZBqjZyjA

Agreed. Was on TV last night and I watched it for the umpteenth time and was still choked up by this scene.

SteveGaines
03-23-2011, 09:31 AM
It should be against the law for anyone else to ever to try to portray Doc Holiday other than Val Kilmer. I've seen just about all the movies based on "The Shootout" at the OK Corral....Kilmer IMO is by far the best...

Peteyvee
03-23-2011, 09:35 AM
Who played the best Doc Holiday?

Kirk Douglas


There's only one Doc Holliday and it was Kirk Douglas! Who is this imposter the other guys are talking about?

MOJO
03-23-2011, 09:39 AM
another Kilmer vote

Wombat
03-23-2011, 09:47 AM
Tombstone was a good movie, but it was a bit over the top and campy. I loved Kilmer's portrayal of Holiday, but it was a little "hamm'd up" if you ask me. Quiad's Holiday was probably a little more accurate as the Wyatt Earp movie was more "bio pic" and Tombstone was more glamour. Just my 2 cents.

:aok Quaid lost like 40 lbs just to do the role and came across as more miserable than tough which is how I would expect someone dying of TB to be. Plus that southern drawl and the interplay between him and Isabella Rosselini was classic

Guitarzandstuff
03-23-2011, 09:47 AM
Kilmer!!

jumpnblues
03-23-2011, 09:51 AM
Kilmer was more entertaining, Quaid was more realistic.


Tom

Brazen
03-23-2011, 09:55 AM
Val Kilmer is a damn good actor and one of my favs. Comedy or drama he just does it well.

This is all I've seen by him and I enjoyed them.

Streets of Blood
Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (he's Gay Perry lol)
Run For the Money
Tombstone
Thunderheart
The Doors
Real Genius
Top Secret

taco-man
03-23-2011, 09:56 AM
I vote for Kilmer.
I liked Powers Boothe in that movie as Curly Bill Brocius too.
http://image2.findagrave.com/photos250/photos/2007/147/18042227_118036574254.jpg

Bluedawg
03-23-2011, 09:56 AM
I can't work up the gumption to watch Wyatt Earp .... too much Kevin Costner for me

Kilmer is my pick ... but I need to go back and review the old versions with Kirk Douglas and other classic actors

:munch

stratzrus
03-23-2011, 10:04 AM
Kilmer.

wideawake
03-23-2011, 10:09 AM
Kilmer.

doublea
03-23-2011, 10:15 AM
Kilmer hands down. So many great lines in Tombstone. Michael Biehn as Ringo was another standout performance.

Wyatt: "Not going to fight you Ringo, there's no money in it. Sober up. C'mon boys..."
Ringo: "Wretched slugs! Don't any of you have the guts to play for blood."
Doc: "I'm your huckleberry. That's just my game."

Blue Light
03-23-2011, 11:06 AM
Val Kilmer really stands out in that flick.
But I gotta throw down some props for 1946 John Ford flick, My Darling Clementine, which is one of my top-3 westerns of all time. (Shane would be first. Don't know what the third is this moment.)
The only weak link in it is actually the choice of Victor Mature as Doc Holliday. Well, it's an odd choice, and odder still when you include this scene, a pretty unique scene, you'll have to admit, in the annals of oaters and shoot-em-ups.

5UrcR_01-bM




There's a pretty informative writeup on Doc Holliday on Wikipedia.
Bio sketch, plus all those who played the role (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doc_Holliday)

shibby
03-23-2011, 02:30 PM
I'm gonna say Quaid. I liked Wyatt Earp overall better than Tombstone as well.

thornie
03-23-2011, 02:39 PM
And to think Doc was just a mild mannered Dentist with a bad gambling addiction.

Val Kilmer killed it, and was awesome.

9fingers
03-23-2011, 03:34 PM
"Accuracy" aside, Kilmer's Doc Holiday is one of the iconic flim characters of all time.

"I have not yet begun to defile myself".

EricPeterson
03-23-2011, 03:39 PM
Val Kilmer.

robochimp
03-23-2011, 03:49 PM
"Accuracy" aside, Kilmer's Doc Holiday is one of the iconic flim characters of all time.

"I have not yet begun to defile myself".

This.

mcdes
03-23-2011, 04:32 PM
Kilmer for sure!!

fredgarvin
03-23-2011, 05:03 PM
Kilmer. The real Doc was an alcoholic hothead that pulled his gun often, but missed a lot, fortunately for somse filks.. He was also known to stab folks to death.

Bluedawg
03-23-2011, 05:07 PM
Kilmer. The real Doc was an alcoholic hothead that pulled his gun often, but missed a lot, fortunately for somse filks.. He was also known to stab folks to death.


My take is that the real Holiday had a "death wish," literally

he was trying to get killed ... to relieve him from his Tuberculosis ... but was too proud to suicide

IMHO YMMV

:munch

re-animator
03-23-2011, 05:09 PM
http://www.fantasticfansite.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/roy-halladay.jpg

billfoma
03-23-2011, 05:37 PM
I agree, Val Kilmer was awesome!

X - Road 28
03-23-2011, 05:45 PM
Val Kilmer - end of discussion.....

Julia343
03-23-2011, 05:48 PM
I liked Tombstone. Val did a great job as Doc Holliday. And then there's Sam Elliot as Morgan Earp -- Sam :aok

gproud5150
03-23-2011, 05:53 PM
"i have two guns,one fuh each of ya".. man how did he come up with the perfect line every time? incredible....on the other hand,just watched mr.kilmer in macgruber..whew what a stinker

I especially love how he pulls out both guns and twirls them in opposite directions when he says that. I think that was one of the best parts of that movie. Val was amazing in that role, and he owns it as far as I'm concerned.

I liked Tombstone. Val did a great job as Doc Holliday. And then there's Sam Elliot as Morgan Earp -- Sam :aok

Sam Elliot is just plain cool no matter what he does.

roadscholar
03-23-2011, 05:57 PM
Val Kilmer. Just nailed that role to the wall. Reminds me that I need to see Tombstone again...it's been a couple of years.

todaystomorrow
03-23-2011, 06:03 PM
Kilmer

Just saw Tombstone again Monday night on the big screen for a retro movie night. My first time seeing it in the theatre. Great!

Brian D
03-23-2011, 08:39 PM
You can take your pick from the Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doc_Holliday) list:

Actors who have played Holliday in name include:

Cesar Romero in Frontier Marshal, 1939, plays Doc Halliday, a surgeon, not a dentist, who is ambushed coming out of the Belle Union tavern after performing surgery on the bartender's son. Wyatt Earp single-handedly fights and wins a gunfight against Doc's killers at OK Corral. Doc's tombstone in Boot Hill, the last shot in the film, reads John Halliday 1848-1880.

Walter Huston in The Outlaw, in 1943, a Howard Hughes film.

Victor Mature in My Darling Clementine, in 1946, directed by John Ford, with Henry Fonda as Wyatt Earp. Holliday is portrayed as an Eastern-born surgeon fleeing his fiancee because of his tuberculosis and dissolute lifestyle. Writer Alan Barra's comment on this movie is that it shows Holliday as he might have been, if he had been a tough-guy from Boston: "Victor Mature looks about as tubercular as a Kodiak bear." Also, Holliday is killed at the Corral, when in fact he survived it. And Ringo was not even there.

Kim Spalding in the syndicated television series Stories of the Century (1954), starring and hosted by Jim Davis.

Kirk Douglas in Gunfight at the OK Corral, in 1957, with Burt Lancaster as Earp. Again, Holliday's feud with Ringo is a large part of the story, and Ringo dies at the Corral. In fact, he was not involved and committed suicide.

Douglas Fowley in "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" television series 1955-1961. As with many popular portrayals Fowley played Holliday as considerably older than the historical figure. Taking his cue from the popular Kirk Douglas portrayal, Fowley played Holliday as courtly, temperamental and dangerous. Unlike the Kirk Douglas Holliday, whose anger is often volcanic, Fowley's Holliday maintained a cool, gentlemanly Southern calm.

Gerald Mohr and Peter Breck each played Holliday more than once in the 1957 television series Maverick.

John McLiam played Doc Holliday in the pilot episode of the short-lived 1981 television series Bret Maverick.

Arthur Kennedy played Holliday opposite James Stewart as Earp in director John Ford's Cheyenne Autumn.

Adam West played Doc Holliday on an episode of the TV series Lawman.

Christopher Dark in an 1963 episode of the TV series Bonanza.

Anthony Jacobs in the 1966 Doctor Who story The Gunfighters.

Jason Robards in Hour of the Gun, a 1967 sequel to the 1957 movie, with James Garner as Earp. This is the first movie to fully delve into the vendetta that followed the gunfight; both films were directed by John Sturges.

Sam Gilman in the 1968 Star Trek episode "Spectre of the Gun". Gilman, who refers to the character as 'Dil Holliday', was 53 years old at the time he played this role. The real Holliday was 30 years old at the time of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

Stacy Keach in Doc, in 1971, in which the Tombstone events are told from his perspective.

Bill Fletcher in two episodes of the TV series, Alias Smith and Jones: "Which Way to the OK Corral?" in 1971 and "The Ten Days That Shook Kid Curry" in 1972.

Dennis Hopper in Wild Times, a 1980 television mini-series based on Brian Garfield's novel.

Deadlands in the book Law Dogs. Doc Holliday is referred to as the first Hexslinger. It is also claimed that the Indian tribes continue to resurrect him upon death, but never fix his Tuberculosis

Willie Nelson in the 1986 all-singer/actor TV-remake of Stagecoach. In addition to the alcoholic Doc Boone character of the original film, the remake adds a new "Doc Holliday", also a medical doctor, and a consumptive. Since Doc Boone in the original film is loosely based on Holliday, the remake now contains two characters based on Holliday. If the character of the Southern-gentleman-gambler Hatfield is also partly based on Holliday (being played by the thin John Carradine, for emphasis, in the original film), then the 1986 remake actually contains three characters in whole or partly based on Holliday.

Val Kilmer in Tombstone, in 1993. Sylvia D. Lynch in Aristocracy's Outlaw believes Kilmer caught Holliday's cheerful mix of despair and courage. But his last fight with Ringo is fiction. He was miles away, in court, when Ringo either committed suicide, or was killed.

Dennis Quaid in Wyatt Earp, in 1994, a detailed bio-epic of Wyatt Earp's life where Quaid plays an oft drunk Doc Holliday with a relationship with Big Nose Kate.

Randy Quaid in Purgatory, a 1999 TV film about dead outlaws in a town between Heaven and Hell.

Bankston
03-23-2011, 09:28 PM
I think I'm the one person in the world that preferred Quaid's performance.

"You can all kiss my rebel d*ck!"

jtm622
03-23-2011, 09:31 PM
You can take your pick from the Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doc_Holliday) list:

Actors who have played Holliday in name include:


Douglas Fowley in "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" television series 1955-1961. As with many popular portrayals Fowley played Holliday as considerably older than the historical figure. Taking his cue from the popular Kirk Douglas portrayal, Fowley played Holliday as courtly, temperamental and dangerous. Unlike the Kirk Douglas Holliday, whose anger is often volcanic, Fowley's Holliday maintained a cool, gentlemanly Southern calm.



Wikipedia busts another egg...
Where's Myron Healey in "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp"???
He was also on that show for a period of time, and was the definitive TV "Doc Holliday", IMO...

Here is a link:

http://www.crazyabouttv.com/lifelegendwyattearp.html

:)

tjs
03-23-2011, 09:41 PM
No mention of Stacy Keach (aside from the guy who listed everybody)?

Faye Dunaway :drool

circusinthesky
03-23-2011, 11:31 PM
http://image2.findagrave.com/photos250/photos/2007/147/18042227_118036574254.jpg

Johnny Ringo: Smell that, Bill? Smells like someone died.
Curly Bill: Jesus, Johnny....

alexanderplatz
03-24-2011, 07:07 AM
I agree, Kilmer by a landslide. Honestly, there were some really great characters in Tombstone, Doc Holiday wouldn't have been nearly the same without the great Johnny Ringo scenes, but really a great cast all around.

+1 on all of the above. I thought Tombstone had a lot of great characters. Powers Boothe as Curly Bill Brocius is pretty great for example.

SideBMusic
03-24-2011, 08:22 AM
One of the greatest scenes in the history of Westerns.

KfbAFgD2mLo

Thanks for posting that. It was great to see again. One of my favorite scenes of all time.

tommyg
03-24-2011, 10:10 AM
Who played the best Doc Holiday?

Kirk Douglas



End of Story!!!

davess23
03-24-2011, 11:21 AM
Val Kilmer. The scene where he mocks Johnny Ringo by twirling the tin cup just kills.

Blue Light
03-24-2011, 01:20 PM
Then y'all will be thrilled to learn that Val Kilmer will be starring in a new movie about Wyatt Earp.

Says right here (http://www.empireonline.com/News/story.asp?nid=30446)

The Western world of Wyatt Earp is one that Val Kilmer knows well, having played Doc Holliday in 1993’s Tombstone alongside Kurt Russell as Earp. But now Kilmer is getting an upgrade, landing the role of the lawman himself in indie drama The First Ride of Wyatt Earp.

Darren Benjamin Shepherd wrote the script, which is based on a true story. It sees the elder Earp giving an interview to a reporter and taking the occasion to think back to the journey that made him a legend – with the young marshal rounding up a posse to track down the man who murdered Earp’s best gal by accident.

Country music warbler Trace Adkins will play Earp’s pop, while Diana DeGarmo, Matt Dallas, Wilson Bethel, Shawn Roberts, Stephen Grayhm, Scott Whyte and Levi Fiehler are all part of the younger chunk of the story.

With an eye to producing a “Young Guns for the next generation,” Mike Feifer is busy shooting the movie now in California, but there’s no word on a release date yet.

fredgarvin
03-24-2011, 01:56 PM
My take is that the real Holiday had a "death wish," literally

he was trying to get killed ... to relieve him from his Tuberculosis ... but was too proud to suicide

IMHO YMMV

:munch

That sounds like a good take to me. They say he was completely surprised he lived as long as he did after his diagnosis.

skillet
03-24-2011, 03:25 PM
"Why Johnny Tyler! Madcap...."
"Doc? I didn't know you was in town."
"Where you goin' with that shotgun, Johnny?"

And don't forget the great Stephen Lang as Ike Clanton; the one guy you really want to see get shot, yet he somehow survived the film ('Tombstone', that is, for those at home).

"I don't take no lip from no bartenders neither."

outlawyer
03-24-2011, 03:53 PM
Tombstone was certainly well written, one memorable line after another. Somebody told me that David Mamet wrote it, and I bought it for years. But it was actually written by Kevin Jarre, which makes sense. Mamet's a fine writer, but I don't recall anything with so many keepers as Tombstone from him. I know guys who can practically recite the entire movie.

_MonSTeR_
03-24-2011, 04:28 PM
Thanks for posting that. It was great to see again. One of my favorite scenes of all time.


The "I wasn't" line is one of the scariest, most menacing movie lines ever.

Stratobuc
03-24-2011, 06:46 PM
Kirk Douglas

lager86
03-24-2011, 07:14 PM
Very cosmopolitan.

PUCKBOY99
03-24-2011, 07:19 PM
The acting in Tombstone was 100 times better than Wyatt Earp !

Val Kilmer > Dennis Quaid....by a friggin mile ! (Doc Holliday)

Kurt Russell > Kevin Costner (Wyatt Earp)

Stephen Lang > Jeff Fahey (Ike Clanton)....Fahey is always a good creep, but Lang OWNED that role.

Sam Elliot > Michael Madsen (Virgil Earp)

Dana Wheeler > Mare Whinningham (Mattie Blaylock) OK, Dana's hotter !

Dana Delany < Joanna Going (Josie Marcus) Dana's no slouch but Joanna Going was SMOKING HOT !

Michael Biehn > Norman Howell (Johnny Ringo)..."Terminator" dude vs. WHO ???

I actually recently watched Wyatt Earp again & thought, "WOW....what a horrible(acting) movie !"

Brian D
03-24-2011, 08:43 PM
The acting in Tombstone was 100 times better than Wyatt Earp !

Val Kilmer > Dennis Quaid....by a friggin mile ! (Doc Holliday)

Kurt Russell > Kevin Costner (Wyatt Earp)

Stephen Lang > Jeff Fahey (Ike Clanton)....Fahey is always a good creep, but Lang OWNED that role.

Sam Elliot > Michael Madsen (Virgil Earp)

Dana Wheeler > Mare Whinningham (Mattie Blaylock) OK, Dana's hotter !

Dana Delany < Joanna Going (Josie Marcus) Dana's no slouch but Joanna Going was SMOKING HOT !

Michael Biehn > Norman Howell (Johnny Ringo)..."Terminator" dude vs. WHO ???

I actually recently watched Wyatt Earp again & thought, "WOW....what a horrible(acting) movie !"We're talking about acting, right? ;)

fredgarvin
03-24-2011, 09:04 PM
Wyatt Earp was a dismal film.

PUCKBOY99
03-25-2011, 05:53 AM
we're talking about acting, right? ;)

wellllllllllll................YEAH !!!! :D

DWB1960
03-25-2011, 07:32 AM
The "I wasn't" line is one of the scariest, most menacing movie lines ever.

Seeing Johnny Ringo scared for the first time in the movie when he said the preceding line was a trip.

"I was just fooling about"