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View Full Version : What was the generation after the baby boomers called?


rob2001
07-03-2011, 08:23 AM
Like kids of the 60's. ??????

leofenderbender
07-03-2011, 08:28 AM
Generation X, though I don't know Y.

slopeshoulder
07-03-2011, 08:30 AM
generation X, based on a book of the same title.
then gen Y or millennial.

rob2001
07-03-2011, 08:34 AM
I got my generations mixed up! I thought Gen X was a few generations after the 60's, like kids of the 80's.

So whats the knock on this generation??? (my generation) Just Hippies?

A-Bone
07-03-2011, 08:35 AM
Like kids of the 60's. ??????

The Baby Boom is generally thought to end in 1964, which means that an awful lot of the kids born in the 60s are later baby boomers. As has been suggested, the next generation is the one referred to as Generation X, which is generally considered to include children born between 1964 and 1979 or thereabouts, with 1970 being the lowest year in terms of recorded births.

rob2001
07-03-2011, 08:48 AM
The Baby Boom is generally thought to end in 1964, which means that an awful lot of the kids born in the 60s are later baby boomers. As has been suggested, the next generation is the one referred to as Generation X, which is generally considered to include children born between 1964 and 1979 or thereabouts, with 1970 being the lowest year in terms of recorded births.


Thanks for the info.

1964, the year The Beatles broke out.....Hmmmmmm.

CharlyG
07-03-2011, 08:51 AM
and when we matured, we were Yuppies IIRC, not to be confused with Generation Y

Gilky
07-03-2011, 08:58 AM
The Pepsi Generation.

rob2001
07-03-2011, 08:59 AM
No no....don't think i'm a yuppie...I don't like the city and i'm no professional!

Interesting point though. The yuppie got a lot of press and airtime, so thats an aspect that gets remembered. I'm thinking yuppies were a minority.

A-Bone
07-03-2011, 09:03 AM
No no....don't think i'm a yuppie...I don't like the city and i'm no professional!

Interesting point though. The yuppie got a lot of press and airtime, so thats an aspect that gets remembered. I'm thinking yuppies were a minority.

And the earliest Yuppies were Baby Boomers, not Gen X-ers, but Yuppie crosses generations.

rob2001
07-03-2011, 09:10 AM
Just to clarify, I was born 1-29-64. I guess i'm trying to figure out what society thinks I am!

I definitely remember all that stuff Wiki says is cohort#2, but I wasn't an adult and actively participating until the late 70's/early 80's.

CharlyG
07-03-2011, 09:11 AM
Born in 51 here, and I agree with Wiki.

A-Bone
07-03-2011, 09:13 AM
Just to clarify, I was born 1-29-64. I guess i'm trying to figure out what society thinks I am!

I definitely remember all that stuff Wiki says is cohort#2, but I wasn't an adult and actively participating until the late 70's/early 80's.

I suspect it is always tricky when you are at the very tail end of a generational demarcation, such as in your case.

Maybe you should look between the defining Boomer and Generation X characteristics, and see if you feel like you fit more or relate more strongly to one or the other.

Mike Anderson
07-03-2011, 09:15 AM
"The Poor Losers Who Will Have To Pay For The Baby Boomers' Old Age" would be the most accurate label.

lcjc800
07-03-2011, 09:19 AM
:rimshot

coralreefer
07-03-2011, 10:30 AM
The Age of Aquarius?

DrMerle

cruisemates
07-03-2011, 10:45 AM
Wiki is right - Baby Boomers ended in 1954 - meaning I barely uqalify. As a late boomer I actually think the early boomers had far more fun than I did (although my teens and 20s could not have been more of a gas). But I was a little too young to go to the love-ins or move to San Francisco in 67 (I was still in grade school). Most of the great British bands of the 60s were early to mid-boomer aged - they were already living in "band houses" when I was still doing freshman algebra.

But I do remember a time when music as a form of entertainment was taken as seriously as TV or movies. When the debut of a new album by a certain artist would be the only thing people talked about for a whole week. Albums like Led Zeppelin 1, Sargeant Peppers, etc actually changed our lives.

skydog
07-03-2011, 10:49 AM
The whole concept of a generation always escaped me. I mean people are born every minute of every day. So what defines a generation. On what day did the baby boomer generation stop and generation x (or whatever) start?

Pfeister
07-03-2011, 11:03 AM
That's technically generation X. Although, most boomers seem to call anybody after their generation Generation X.


The whole concept of a generation always escaped me. I mean people are born every minute of every day. So what defines a generation. On what day did the baby boomer generation stop and generation x (or whatever) start?

There are specific years of birth that will put you in one or another. They're not officially or anything, though.

skydog
07-03-2011, 11:10 AM
That's technically generation X. Although, most boomers seem to call anybody after their generation Generation X.




There are specific years of birth that will put you in one or another. They're not officially or anything, though.
Any specifics?

Pfeister
07-03-2011, 11:15 AM
Any specifics?

They describe them here.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generations#Western_world

BTW, I love that they added this:
"One of the features of Boomers was that they tended to think of themselves as a special generation..."

I don't know what that the "was" is all about though, going by the discussions around here the last couple days.:rotflmao

senseofrelief
07-03-2011, 11:26 AM
A 'generation' is considered to impact in their teens...music, culture, politics..etc.

Boomers where born from the returning WWII vets..in '45...puts the kids in their teens during the 60s...roughly 5-10 years later when the hippies starting having kids, those kids hit their teens in the 80s...having kids say in the 90s...

The kids of the 80s, has spawned the "Peter Pan' generation.....

You can Wiki it...the time lines are a little blurred..but really the big post WWII baby boom...meaning Grandpa, coming home from the war, banging grandma's head against the headboard until some kids popped out.....set up the kids of the 60s, who had the kids of the 80s, who spawned the teens of today...(facepalm)

Pfeister
07-03-2011, 11:27 AM
The kids of the 80s, has spawned the "Peter Pan' generation.....


I'm an 80's child and I have never heard that term before. What does that even mean?

senseofrelief
07-03-2011, 11:36 AM
I'm an 80's child and I have never heard that term before. What does that even mean?

Hit up Wiki for details..

The generation that chooses, like Peter Pan, to not grow up.

Keep in mind it's a generalization...like the 60s, not all kids were hippies...70s...not all kids were out back smoking pot and listening to Zepplin, 80s, not all of them grew up to do rails on Strippers while listening to Bon Jovi....(lol)

But if your 25, living in your mom's basement, fapping away to online porn, confused about life, not sure if you like boys or girls...then, like the Androgynous Peter Pan, the term may apply to you in some fashion.

greggorypeccary
07-03-2011, 11:39 AM
"The Poor Losers Who Will Have To Pay For The Baby Boomers' Old Age" would be the most accurate label.

Love it!!! :)

Pfeister
07-03-2011, 11:44 AM
Hit up Wiki for details..

The generation that chooses, like Peter Pan, to not grow up.

Keep in mind it's a generalization...like the 60s, not all kids were hippies...70s...not all kids were out back smoking pot and listening to Zepplin, 80s, not all of them grew up to do rails on Strippers while listening to Bon Jovi....(lol)

But if your 25, living in your mom's basement, fapping away to online porn, confused about life, not sure if you like boys or girls...then, like the Androgynous Peter Pan, the term may apply to you in some fashion.

Whoa, that's definitely just a stereotype!
There are a lot of people in their 20's who aren't getting good jobs etc, but that has more to do with us all graduating college or high school and being sent straight into a recession. I went out with all kinds of ambition, but with the economy the way it is, I'm barely treading water.

Getting a trash heap dumped on you so you can't do anything is a lot different from "not growing up". I would love, just once, to hear a Baby Boomer say all this isn't our fault. Just once.

We're going to be busy for next couple decades digging our way out this mess. I, and most people I know, can't even dream of owning a house or anything like that. We all got shafted.

Julia343
07-03-2011, 11:52 AM
I don't know many boomers (Truman was still pres), and I am one. Basically I can't stand them.

rob2001
07-03-2011, 12:38 PM
We're going to be busy for next couple decades digging our way out this mess. I, and most people I know, can't even dream of owning a house or anything like that. We all got shafted.


I can see a little of the shafting your talking about. It has affected everyone, not just your generation.

But at least when I came of working age.. (1982 or so), there were jobs. Educated and non-educated people could find living wage jobs. America was still at the top of the economic heap.

Figure the boomers and my generation were still thriving on a strong US economy. Not because we were superior, but because most other world economies were destroyed by WWII and we took full advantage. It's taken 50 years or so for other countries to rebuild and now we're all paying the price for 1/2 a century of prosperity.

But still, it's not like your generation was born into the great depression of 1929. Obviously I wasn't there but I find it a fascinating subject and i've researched it quite a bit. I don't know if any generation will ever have it that tough again.

FeloniousBishop
07-03-2011, 12:39 PM
There's a bit of a grey area between the end of one generation and the start of the next, as far as culturally. Kind of like db/octave rolloff curves of crossovers...

In the last few years of one generation the characteristics of that generation are much weaker in those born in those last few years, and people start to take on some of the characteristics of the next generation. Kind of a cuspal thing.

Really people born in the early 60s (1960 to 1964) are not like true baby boomers. They have increasing amounts of Gen X tendencies.

All generally speaking of course.

I've read (googled) quite a bit on this because I was born in 1963 and don't really consider myself a baby boomer or a Gen Xer.

Pfeister
07-03-2011, 12:46 PM
I can see a little of the shafting your talking about. It has affected everyone, not just your generation.

But at least when I came of working age.. (1982 or so), there were jobs. Educated and non-educated people could find living wage jobs. America was still at the top of the economic heap.

Figure the boomers and my generation were still thriving on a strong US economy. Not because we were superior, but because most other world economies were destroyed by WWII and we took full advantage. It's taken 50 years or so for other countries to rebuild and now we're all paying the price for 1/2 a century of prosperity.

But still, it's not like your generation was born into the great depression of 1929. Obviously I wasn't there but I find it a fascinating subject and i've researched it quite a bit. I don't know if any generation will ever have it that tough again.

I agree with all of that.

Everybody is affected, but I'd be lying if I said it doesn't get to me when I hear somebody with a nice house and a two cars complaining about the economy. Almost everybody I know my age is living in apartments and barely getting by, if they're getting by at all. The people I know who have houses all live in Ohio, where the houses cost next to nothing since the collapse, but even they can barely pull it off.

To the rest of us, a house and a good job seems like a pipe dream.

My Dad is a boomer and he was able to work a blue collar job and get a huge house with an in-ground pool, huge yard, two or three cars, etc.. That was normal for them. I couldn't imagine that right now and my wife and I are well educated.

rob2001
07-03-2011, 01:04 PM
I agree with all of that.

Everybody is affected, but I'd be lying if I said it doesn't get to me when I hear somebody with a nice house and a two cars complaining about the economy. Almost everybody I know my age is living in apartments and barely getting by, if they're getting by at all. The people I know who have houses all live in Ohio, where the houses cost next to nothing since the collapse, but even they can barely pull it off.

To the rest of us, a house and a good job seems like a pipe dream.

My Dad is a boomer and he was able to work a blue collar job and get a huge house with an in-ground pool, huge yard, two or three cars, etc.. That was normal for them. I couldn't imagine that right now and my wife and I are well educated.


There was a time when owning a house seemed like a pipe dream to me too. I didn't buy my first and only house until I was 41. And ya, because of the economy hitting my chosen trade hard, it's a struggle to keep it.

So really the struggles are the same, just on different scales.

bluesjuke
07-03-2011, 01:13 PM
Like kids of the 60's. ??????



GHS Boomers.

A-Bone
07-03-2011, 01:22 PM
Wiki is right - Baby Boomers ended in 1954 - meaning I barely uqalify. As a late boomer I actually think the early boomers had far more fun than I did (although my teens and 20s could not have been more of a gas). But I was a little too young to go to the love-ins or move to San Francisco in 67 (I was still in grade school). Most of the great British bands of the 60s were early to mid-boomer aged - they were already living in "band houses" when I was still doing freshman algebra.

But I do remember a time when music as a form of entertainment was taken as seriously as TV or movies. When the debut of a new album by a certain artist would be the only thing people talked about for a whole week. Albums like Led Zeppelin 1, Sargeant Peppers, etc actually changed our lives.

The Baby Boom ended around '64. It most definitely did not end in '54. It is measured based on comparative birth rates. The period from '46 to '64 saw a previously unprecedented spike in birth rates.

So most of the most lauded and successful musicians that shaped music in the 60s were not baby boomers themselves, as they were too old.

gpro34
07-03-2011, 01:25 PM
The generation after the Boomers would be Generation X (1967-1979) which is a very small generation. They are also called the Baby Bust generation due to the small number of births. Gen Y, or Millennials as they are called by some, actually will surpass the Baby Boomers in sheer number. There is some debate as to when the Baby Boomers ended. Some say 1964, others say 1966. There is on ongoing debate as to which is correct. Now we have Generation Z coming in after the Gen Y. Gen Y's have been known to live at home longer than any other generation prior. Currently Gen X are the most educated, but the Y's will probably surpass them by sheer number alone, especially since many are living at home that are almost 30 years of age and staying in school and opting not to work. We did a study about the differences in the generations and it's really interesting. While Boomers and Gen X were motivated by money and typically worked long hours. Gen Y's are less concerned with status and material wealth. Instead, they prefer more recreational or free time and would prefer to make less and also work less hours. Companies that used to just throw more money at people to get the to be a slave to the grind are having a hard time following traditional methods with the Gen Y's. I really feel like Gen Y's are nothing like Baby Boomers.

Pietro
07-03-2011, 01:26 PM
It's a little known fact, but they were all called Ralph, even though they go by some other name now...

greggorypeccary
07-03-2011, 01:47 PM
The generation after the Boomers would be Generation X (1967-1979) which is a very small generation. They are also called the Baby Bust generation due to the small number of births. Gen Y, or Millenials as they are called by some, actually will surpass the Baby Boomers in sheer number. There is some debate as to when the Baby Boomers ended. Some say 1964, others say 1966. There is on ongoing debate as to which is correct. Now we have Generation Z coming in after the Gen Y. Gen Y's have been known to live at home longer than any other generation prior. Currently Gen X are the most educated, but the Y's will probably surpass them by sheer number alone, especially since many are living at home until 30 years of age and staying in school and opting not to work. We did a study about the differences in the generations and it's really interesting. While Boomers and Gen X were motivated by money and typically worked long hours. Gen Y's are less concerned with status and material wealth. Instead, they prefer more recreational or free time and would prefer to make less and also work less hours. Companies that used to just throw more money at people to get the to be a slave to the grind are having a hard time following traditional methods with the Gen Y's. I really feel like Gen Y's are nothing like Baby Boomers.

Nothing wrong with that. I just don't want to hear them complain that they can't buy a house because of it.

Signed - Gen X'r

:wave

coralreefer
07-03-2011, 01:59 PM
But if your 25, living in your mom's basement, fapping away to online porn, confused about life, not sure if you like boys or girls...then, like the Androgynous Peter Pan, the term may apply to you in some fashion.

Beautiful!!:boxer

Don't forget working part time at mocha shop...

DrMerle

bluesjuke
07-03-2011, 02:01 PM
gpro34-
"Companies that used to just throw more money at people to get the to be a slave to the grind........."


I am still willing and available for such work.

Not a Gen Y'er but if I shave I can look closer to the part.

gpro34
07-03-2011, 02:15 PM
I agree with all of that.

Everybody is affected, but I'd be lying if I said it doesn't get to me when I hear somebody with a nice house and a two cars complaining about the economy. Almost everybody I know my age is living in apartments and barely getting by, if they're getting by at all. The people I know who have houses all live in Ohio, where the houses cost next to nothing since the collapse, but even they can barely pull it off.

To the rest of us, a house and a good job seems like a pipe dream.

My Dad is a boomer and he was able to work a blue collar job and get a huge house with an in-ground pool, huge yard, two or three cars, etc.. That was normal for them. I couldn't imagine that right now and my wife and I are well educated.

I know it's really sad. I make jokes all of the time about the Ph.D. gas station clerk, but it's not too far off. My friends dad (Boomer) was a cop, and his wife never worked. They raised three children and were able to have a nice house, a vacation home, a sprint car (his hobby) and take family vacations off of his salary alone. Those were the days. Now, I know guys with masters degrees (MBA's) that are starting out at 28-30k a year. Hell, he made more than that 25 years ago with a high school education. I would say that the downturn wasn't just other economies catching up. Those economies would have never been where they are were it not for transnational companies shipping away our good jobs for cheap labor. They had a lot of help. The manufacturing were the most time consuming and costly jobs to set up overseas. The white-collar jobs are much easier to send away. Currently, accounting jobs are leaving ( mostly to India) at an alarming rate. Many more will follow suit.There are just not enough service jobs to stabilize an economy. Without manufacturing and the like, all of the small bumps in the road are felt. Anyway, all of the generations (other than the Boomers) seem to be getting the shaft.

skydog
07-03-2011, 02:39 PM
You can Wiki it...the time lines are a little blurred..
Blurred indeed. That's precisely why there can't be any such thing as a generation. Within families yes, within society no.

nitehawk55
07-03-2011, 02:48 PM
It's the ME generation . I don't respect or care about anyone or anything but ME generation....at least for right now .

sinner
07-03-2011, 03:38 PM
I always thought being born in the 30s-40s were the "Lost Generation"; 40s-50s were the Beats (later called Boomers); 60s-70s were "Flower Child" generations; 70s-80s Gen-X; 80s-90s and above are the ?

stevieboy
07-03-2011, 07:21 PM
The original definition of baby boomers was for the kids that the people who went through WWII had when they settled down after the war. Hard to put someone born in '64 in that group. The definition that sociologists put on it later when they got the data in and plotted their curves is an academic thing and IMO mostly arbritrary, and it doesn't reflect the differences in society between 46 and 64, nor the experiences of growing up encountered by the kids at the two ends of the time period.

Ken Ho
07-03-2011, 09:45 PM
I was made in 1964, and I'm definitely Gen X. Don't you call me a boomer !!

The definitions are arbitrary and blurred, but still useful concepts.
Plenty of Gen Y kids out there who are smart, hard-working and motivated by ambition and money though, so only useful to a point.
The slackers just get more press. I've found the Gen Y stereotype kinda wears off in the 20's, and peeps become like peeps have always been.
Just as hipsters will turn into grumpy old men eventually, just like all the dope-smokinf peace loving hippy dudes have done.

senseofrelief
07-04-2011, 12:42 AM
What you guys are missing...it's not when you were born, but the time you were teenagers...

Thus the peeps born out of the WWII baby boom...45 or so...turn 15 in 60...thus the kids of the 60s...the baby boomers....the kids born in the 60s...turning 15 or so in 75-85...are Gen X(me)...the kids born of the 80s...turning 15 or so around the millenium...Peter Pan.

shane88
07-04-2011, 01:42 AM
generation generalization!

Tom CT
10-13-2011, 04:48 PM
and when we matured, we were Yuppies IIRC, not to be confused with Generation Y

A Yuppy is a "young urban professional". It has nothing to do with year of birth. It refers to a segment of the working class and is not age-dependent.

A-Bone
10-13-2011, 04:53 PM
A Yuppy is a "young urban professional". It has nothing to do with year of birth. It refers to a segment of the working class and is not age-dependent.

Except in as much as "young" has any meaning. ;)

Polynitro
10-13-2011, 04:54 PM
GenX can kick Gen Boomers ass.

chandlerman
10-13-2011, 05:00 PM
I would love, just once, to hear a Baby Boomer say all this isn't our fault. Just once.

It's not your fault.

defcrew
10-13-2011, 05:10 PM
The fall guys?

PSaulino
10-13-2011, 05:14 PM
What's after Generation Z??

Do we start over at "A"? Do start adding numbers to the letters(Z1, Z2, Z3)? Or double the letters like an Excel sheet (AA, AB, AC etc?)

Oh the agony and stress of not knowing!!


Paul
Born in '63
will be dead before the above is answered

Colors
10-13-2011, 05:22 PM
Baby Boomers are like the guy who slinks away before the group check arrives and leaves a $5 note on the table. Except when the rest of the group tallies up the tab they discover the slinker had 2 beers and 3 martinis.

Tom CT
10-13-2011, 06:51 PM
Except in as much as "young" has any meaning. ;)

I should have said "date-of-birth-dependent". I think you know what I meant.

Hardtail63
10-13-2011, 08:18 PM
The DOD defines the baby boom as beginning in 1945 (Sept) until 31 Dec 1961.
The next generation was officially designated the "My Parents are Self Aborbed Twits who Make me Uncomfortable" generation.

BR532
10-13-2011, 10:12 PM
Baby Black Hole'rs?

geoangus
10-14-2011, 04:58 AM
being born in '61, I've considered myself a boomer only because my dad was a WWII vet. But two of my sibs, born in '47 & '49, fit the definition more than I do.

Fred Farkus
10-14-2011, 05:30 AM
Whoa, that's definitely just a stereotype!
There are a lot of people in their 20's who aren't getting good jobs etc, but that has more to do with us all graduating college or high school and being sent straight into a recession. I went out with all kinds of ambition, but with the economy the way it is, I'm barely treading water.

Getting a trash heap dumped on you so you can't do anything is a lot different from "not growing up". I would love, just once, to hear a Baby Boomer say all this isn't our fault. Just once.

We're going to be busy for next couple decades digging our way out this mess. I, and most people I know, can't even dream of owning a house or anything like that. We all got shafted.

I agree you can pretty much blame the boomers for the current mess we're in, much as they blamed their parents generation. You can see it in films from the late 60s and early 70s- this self-absorbed preoccupation with 'me' while they squander their children's future.

My kids and their friends are in your generation and I feel for you. They are hard workers and good kids but opporunities for a better life than ours are becoming more scarce. Meanwhile, old men bitch about all manner of "things today", placing blame on the current generation and laying their responsibilities on their children's feet. But I would expect nothing less from the boomer generation. Kids today, eh?

AudioWonderland
10-14-2011, 05:39 AM
Stoners....

Dickie Fredericks
10-14-2011, 06:59 AM
There was a time when owning a house seemed like a pipe dream to me too. I didn't buy my first and only house until I was 41. And ya, because of the economy hitting my chosen trade hard, it's a struggle to keep it.

So really the struggles are the same, just on different scales.
I feel for a right now man. The trade is in the dumps right now.

BTW, I was born in 66 which seems to be a year in question or something. Id say Im Gen X.

semi-hollowbody
10-14-2011, 07:02 AM
doomed!

germs
10-14-2011, 07:16 AM
here's a fun one:

my dad is the 9th child of a WWII veteran, technically qualified as a Baby Boomer - born 1961.

i am his child - technically a Generation X, born 1982...though i often get grouped in with Millennials because of age.

where am i on that one? do we follow years of birth, or do we follow direct lineage?

Nurk2
10-14-2011, 08:25 AM
Just to clarify, I was born 1-29-64. I guess i'm trying to figure out what society thinks I am!

There's a bit of a grey area between the end of one generation and the start of the next, as far as culturally. Kind of like db/octave rolloff curves of crossovers...

Really people born in the early 60s (1960 to 1964) are not like true baby boomers. They have increasing amounts of Gen X tendencies.

I've read (googled) quite a bit on this because I was born in 1963 and don't really consider myself a baby boomer or a Gen Xer.

There was a time when owning a house seemed like a pipe dream to me too. I didn't buy my first and only house until I was 41.

I was made in 1964, and I'm definitely Gen X. Don't you call me a boomer !!

Born in '63

being born in '61, I've considered myself a boomer only because my dad was a WWII vet. But two of my sibs, born in '47 & '49, fit the definition more than I do.

BTW, I was born in 66 which seems to be a year in question or something. Id say Im Gen X.

Born in 65. My dad is a WWII vet. I'm the youngest of 6 - the sibling closest in age to me was born in 1953.

I feel a strong identification with Gen X. Doug Coupland's novel came out while I was in graduate school - basically hiding out from the then-impossible economy. We had a global recession in the 1980s, banking deregulation/bailouts, AIDS, Iran-Contra all coming on the heals of a long period of inflation, etc. Try graduating from college into THAT....

I too believed that I would never find a decent job or be able to afford a family (and health insurance - a dream!), and I was well into my 30's before I was able to make these things happen professionally and personally.

As some others have pointed out, I really, really do not identify with the boomers at all - and this is with 5 boomers as siblings. I have been fascinated, though, by the Beats - particularly Kerouac, who preceded the boomers and never identified with them, either.

We've been force-fed all the stuff from the boomers (The Beatles, JFK, and all the significant events in their lives) followed by all the crap of their gently-perfumed, coddled children (Lindsay, Paris, Britney).

From the perspective of Gen-Xers, both groups appear remarkably sheltered, naive, and self-satisfied - introspective only and up until the point where they determine that "I'm OK," then on to the next shiny thing that captures their imagination.

Kevin Smith, Quentin Tranatino, David Foster Wallace, John Stewart, Charlie Sheen, Nicolas Cage, Kurt Cobain, Craig Ferguson, John Cusack, Chuck Klosterman - Ambiguous. Ironic. Earnest. Acerbic and creative in a way that can be described as pragmatic and driven. I think it's best summed up in the title of Jeff Gordinier's book: X Saves the World: How Generation X Got the Shaft But Can Still Keep Everything From Sucking.

TNJ
10-14-2011, 10:28 AM
Same as it ever was.
No human being has any power over his/her birth year.
Me, I was born in '56 into one very F'd up family situation. Let's just say the deck was definitely stacked against me and my younger sibs. I decided to get an education and made it through with no thanks (and actually 'he won't make it' stated repeatedly by my family) to my immediate family. Try succeeding in any generation where your parents either have no comment, or actually get angry over your every accomplishment early in life. Is that what it's like to be an X'er? (I doubt it, overall...)
Yeah, I'm a boomer.
F you if you don't like it.
Or worse, walk a mile in my younger sh*t covered shoes.
If you're doing that and trying to make a life despite your adversity, you have my sympathy and respect.
If you grew up with everything and are complaining about being entitled to whatever you want without working for it...see the above expletive.

S.
j

Elias Graves
10-14-2011, 11:57 AM
Like kids of the 60's. ??????

Sick of baby boomers, mostly.

Born in 66 to a WWII vet, the youngest of 6. The self absorbed nature of my older brothers/sister was a big turnoff for me. The boomers love to call the WWII vets "the greatest generation," but all I remember growing up was "don't trust anyone over 30" and "where's mine?"

EG

Peteyvee
10-14-2011, 12:07 PM
I was made in 1964, and I'm definitely Gen X. Don't you call me a boomer !!

The definitions are arbitrary and blurred, but still useful concepts.
Plenty of Gen Y kids out there who are smart, hard-working and motivated by ambition and money though, so only useful to a point.
The slackers just get more press. I've found the Gen Y stereotype kinda wears off in the 20's, and peeps become like peeps have always been.
Just as hipsters will turn into grumpy old men eventually, just like all the dope-smokinf peace loving hippy dudes have done.

My youngest sibling was born in 1965 and she considers herself a boomer. You kids are all screwed up. Now get off my lawn! ;)

Nurk2
10-14-2011, 12:23 PM
Same as it ever was.
No human being has any power over his/her birth year.
Me, I was born in '56 into one very F'd up family situation. Let's just say the deck was definitely stacked against me and my younger sibs. I decided to get an education and made it through with no thanks (and actually 'he won't make it' stated repeatedly by my family) to my immediate family. Try succeeding in any generation where your parents either have no comment, or actually get angry over your every accomplishment early in life. Is that what it's like to be an X'er? (I doubt it, overall...)
Yeah, I'm a boomer.
F you if you don't like it.
Or worse, walk a mile in my younger sh*t covered shoes.
If you're doing that and trying to make a life despite your adversity, you have my sympathy and respect.
If you grew up with everything and are complaining about being entitled to whatever you want without working for it...see the above expletive.

S.
j

I don't know if you are responding to my post specifically (mine is directly above yours) or the tone of the thread in general. Either way, my apologies if I've offended you. I understand every individual's life circumstances diverge in some ways from the "average" of any given group to which that individual belongs. I certainly meant no insult.

Zimi
10-14-2011, 12:47 PM
Try succeeding in any generation where your parents either have no comment, or actually get angry over your every accomplishment early in life.

Many post-Boomers don't realize that psychology was viewed as snake oil in those days; the shrinks were thought of as just a bunch of quacks out to get rich by scamming insurance companies. "Self-esteem" was unheard of, much less a concern of parents. The catch phrase for raising children was "spare the rod, spoil the child". Kids had no identity, no point of view, no purpose other than to eat sh!t and be grateful for it. "Be seen and not heard." Fun was waste of time and an illusion, and something to feel guilty about if you had any.

edited.

Things changed and many Boomers realized the error of their parents' ways, and raised their kids differently, but to the opposite extreme. Kids get praised over nothing.

People are f*d up, have been throughout history, but by the time they realized it it's too late because they've had kids and f*d them up. Maybe one day...

TNJ
10-14-2011, 01:00 PM
Zimi
You're speaking sense from a more informed perspective.
Like I have said before, no generation has the corner on hypocrisy or being F'd up beyond measure.
We can only try to rise above it all as best we can.

S.
j

drive-south
10-14-2011, 01:02 PM
I didn't have time to read all responses here, but I'll add my 2c anyways.

The Baby Boom began at the end of WW2 (1946). Soldiers returned home to get married, start a career and a family. They no longer had that pesky depression or world war to worry about and could get on with their lives. My dad served as a merchant marine during WW2 and served in the US Army just after the war. My parents got married in 1949 and my oldest sister was born in 1950. I was born in 1955 and I'm the youngest of 3. I consider myself to be a baby boomer regardless of the 1954 cutoff. I was a little too young to attend Woodstock (14yo) during that "summer of love 1969).

My 2 nephews (born in 1974 and 1979) are both considered Gen X. After that it got fuzzy and I believe we are now in the "whatever" generation or perhaps the "post-whatever" generation.

A-Bone
10-14-2011, 01:10 PM
I have not ever seen 54 as a cut off for the baby boomers. More typically the cut off is around 64.

Zimi
10-14-2011, 01:11 PM
1946-1964.

It's easy to remember. 46 is 64 backwards.

blueswah
10-14-2011, 01:23 PM
"What was the generation after the baby boomers called?"

It was called the "Me" generation.

The "Me" generation took the newly found social freedoms created by the baby boomer generation and used them in self centered ways.
Thus the label "The Me Generation" was bestowed.

The boomer generation broke through so many social norms of their day.
They opened peoples eyes to the fact that just because 'it had always been done that way' didn't mean it was the 'right' way.

Their rebellion created many of the social freedoms we know today.
It's hard to know what it was like before them,
even the "me" generation had little to no clue of the social restrictions that existed for the generation just before them.

A-Bone
10-14-2011, 01:30 PM
"What was the generation after the baby boomers called?"

It was called the "Me" generation.

The "Me" generation took the newly found social freedoms created by the baby boomer generation and used them in self centered ways.
Thus the label "The Me Generation" was bestowed.

The boomer generation broke through so many social norms of their day.
They opened peoples eyes to the fact that just because 'it had always been done that way' didn't mean it was the 'right' way.

Their rebellion created many of the social freedoms we know today.
It's hard to know what it was like before them,
even the "me" generation had little to no clue of the social restrictions that existed for the generation just before them.

Actually, the "me" generation and the baby boomers are the same generation.

Ultron
10-14-2011, 01:48 PM
"What was the generation after the baby boomers called?"

It was called the "Me" generation.

The "Me" generation took the newly found social freedoms created by the baby boomer generation and used them in self centered ways.
Thus the label "The Me Generation" was bestowed.

The boomer generation broke through so many social norms of their day.
They opened peoples eyes to the fact that just because 'it had always been done that way' didn't mean it was the 'right' way.

Their rebellion created many of the social freedoms we know today.
It's hard to know what it was like before them,
even the "me" generation had little to no clue of the social restrictions that existed for the generation just before them.

that's laughable.....Boomers are the biggest ME generation out there.

Kmaz
10-14-2011, 02:30 PM
There's a book called "Boom, Bust, and Echo". It's about these three generations and the gap between them. Baby "Boom", Baby "Bust", and Echo, which are the Baby Bommer's grandchildren.

Good read!

Kmaz
10-14-2011, 02:34 PM
There's a book called "Boom, Bust, and Echo". It's about these three generations and the gap between them. Baby "Boom", Baby "Bust", and Echo, which are the Baby Bommer's grandchildren.

Good read!

Colors
10-14-2011, 02:41 PM
Actually, the "me" generation and the baby boomers are the same generation.


Bless their hearts, Boomers don't do the self-awareness thing very well so you can excuse them for not realizing they are one and the same.

chrisr777
10-14-2011, 02:48 PM
But my little sister was born in 1964, are telling my sister is a different generation? Boy is she going to love that. Her birthday was on Monday and every year when I call her she says something like, "Well I'm 47 so you must be........"

Zimi
10-14-2011, 03:11 PM
Bless their hearts, Boomers don't do the self-awareness thing very well so you can excuse them for not realizing they are one and the same.

The Boomers are NOT the Me Generation.

The Me Generation came afterwards.
http://img.thegearpage.net/board/images/misc/progress.gif

stevieboy
10-14-2011, 04:04 PM
I don't know, but they learned right away which direction to point their fingers.

Away from themselves.

A-Bone
10-14-2011, 04:14 PM
The Boomers are NOT the Me Generation.

The Me Generation came afterwards.
http://img.thegearpage.net/board/images/misc/progress.gif

No. The boomers are indeed the "me generation". The me generation was made up of people that came into adulthood in the 60s and 70s. That is the baby boomers. The baby boom runs from 46 to 64. Try putting "me generation" in the search on wikipedia and see what entry comes up.

The generation immediately following on the baby boomers is Generation X, who came of age in the 80s and through the 90s. Gen X runs from 65 to 82 or thereabouts, and is decidedly not the "me generation", but is made up of some of the children of that generation.

whitehall
10-14-2011, 04:17 PM
Such a contrast to the Ninja--NoIncomeNoJoborAssets-- generation of today.

rmj254
10-14-2011, 04:36 PM
Such a contrast to the Ninja--NoIncomeNoJoborAssets-- generation of today.

Yep. That's my generation. We're just the worst.

Zimi
10-14-2011, 05:03 PM
No. The boomers are indeed the "me generation". The me generation was made up of people that came into adulthood in the 60s and 70s. That is the baby boomers. The baby boom runs from 46 to 64. Try putting "me generation" in the search on wikipedia and see what entry comes up.

The generation immediately following on the baby boomers is Generation X, who came of age in the 80s and through the 90s. Gen X runs from 65 to 82 or thereabouts, and is decidedly not the "me generation", but is made up of some of the children of that generation.

You're wrong. The Boomers are NOT the Me Generation.

http://www.generationme.org/aboutbook.html

chrisr777
10-14-2011, 05:08 PM
You're wrong. The Boomers are NOT the Me Generation.

http://www.generationme.org/aboutbook.html

Actually your link proves you wrong.

"Baby Boomers were sometimes called the "Me generation" in the 1970s, but this was a premature and brief label: Boomers did not discover the self until young adulthood, and even then did everything in groups, from protests to seminars like est. Generation Me has never known a world that put duty before self, and believes that the needs of the individual should come first. This is not the same thing as being selfish it is captured, instead, in the phrases we so often hear: "Be yourself," "Believe in yourself," "You must love yourself before you can love someone else." These are some of our culture's most deeply entrenched beliefs, and Generation Me has grown up hearing them whispered in our ears like the subliminally conditioned children in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World."

A-Bone
10-14-2011, 05:13 PM
You're wrong. The Boomers are NOT the Me Generation.

http://www.generationme.org/aboutbook.html

No, I'm not. And we were not talking about "generation me" (which, aside from this spurious book has not been appended to those of us otherwise known as Generation X), we were talking about the "me generation."

Me generation
n
(Sociology) the generation, originally in the 1970s, characterized by self-absorption; in the 1980s, characterized by material greed.

This does not mean they were born in the 70s. Instead it means they were born prior to the 70s enough that they could be adults who were self-absorbed at that time, and then greedy further along adults in the 80s.

The term originated with a Tom Wolfe essay describing the 70s as the "Me Decade", meaning the time could be contemporaneously described as the "Me decade", meaning it would be absurd to append the description to people born in 1970, as it applied to adult America in the 70s.

The very link you reference has a paragraph that begins thusly:

"How is Generation Me different from previous generations, especially from the "Me generation" of the 1970s?"

Zimi
10-14-2011, 05:16 PM
Yep, I was wrong. The "Me Generation" and "Generation Me" are two different things.

It says "Me Generation" was a brief label. Funny, I never heard of "Generation Me" until today.

I do know my birthday.

Fred Farkus
10-14-2011, 06:53 PM
Such a contrast to the Ninja--NoIncomeNoJoborAssets-- generation of today.

Which was caused by the me generation. My, look at all the guitars on your wall. You got yours didn't you? Conspicuous consumption at its finest...

uitar99
10-15-2011, 08:03 AM
"The Poor Losers Who Will Have To Pay For The Baby Boomers' Old Age" would be the most accurate label.

As a boomer, I hear this frequently-interesting statement. There are a number of ideas circulating that go along with the statement:

There are a lot of boomers who have paid a lot of taxes for the lifestyle/society we have today, which includes retirement benefits.

There are a lot of 20/30 somethings who are going to benefit from ever increasing job vacancies as the boomers do retire. As a side note a fair number of boomers will work past their normal retirement age as they also can't retire financially.

There are also a lot of "poor losers" who are going to inherit a large swack of wealth when us boomers pass on. This didn't happen when the previous generation passed.

zosozep7
10-15-2011, 08:13 AM
The ME generation

A-Bone
10-15-2011, 09:24 AM
The ME generation

No. The baby boomers are the "me generation".

Me generation
n
(Sociology) the generation, originally in the 1970s, characterized by self-absorption; in the 1980s, characterized by material greed.

This does not mean they were born in the 70s. Instead it means they were born prior to the 70s enough that they could be adults who were self-absorbed at that time, and then greedy further along adults in the 80s.

The term originated with a Tom Wolfe essay describing the 70s as the "Me Decade", meaning the time could be contemporaneously described as the "Me decade", meaning it would be absurd to append the description to people born in 1970, as it applied to adult America in the 70s.

The generation immediately following demographically on the heels of the Baby Boomers, which includes the children from the earlier boomer cohort, is commonly referred to as Generation X.

The generation immediately following Generation X, which is made up in part of late Boomer children, is commonly referred to as either Generation Y or the Millennial Generation, the latter based on their coming of age around the year 2000 or after the turn of the century.

blueswah
10-15-2011, 03:08 PM
If you were there you don't know.....

Zimi
10-15-2011, 03:29 PM
Actually there is no Me Generation. From the article I posted earlier:

"Baby Boomers were sometimes called the "Me generation" in the 1970s, but this was a premature and brief label: Boomers did not discover the self until young adulthood, and even then did everything in groups, from protests to seminars like est."

Since the '70s are over, the Boomers are the Boomers. They happened to be called the Me Generation briefly over 30 years ago; that doesn't mean they are the Me Generation. It means they were called that for a while by some.

I think the confusion comes from the similarity of the names of the Me Generation and Generation Me.

Scott Miller
10-15-2011, 04:41 PM
Actually, the "me" generation and the baby boomers are the same generation.

Bless their hearts, Boomers don't do the self-awareness thing very well so you can excuse them for not realizing they are one and the same.

Me generation
n
(Sociology) the generation, originally in the 1970s, characterized by self-absorption; in the 1980s, characterized by material greed.

This does not mean they were born in the 70s. Instead it means they were born prior to the 70s enough that they could be adults who were self-absorbed at that time, and then greedy further along adults in the 80s.

As a 1954 boomer, the above is not adding up. The idea of "Ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country" made a heck of a lot of sense. Hardly a "me first" sentiment. Later on, what made a lot of sense was "You could have been more than a name on the door on the thirty-third floor in the air." OK, so that was definitely about "me" in the sense of fulfillment, but certainly not in the sense of greed or self-absorption. I've never considered the self-help me-first mania of the 70s to be part of my generation.

A-Bone
10-15-2011, 08:44 PM
Actually there is no Me Generation. From the article I posted earlier:

"Baby Boomers were sometimes called the "Me generation" in the 1970s, but this was a premature and brief label: Boomers did not discover the self until young adulthood, and even then did everything in groups, from protests to seminars like est."

Since the '70s are over, the Boomers are the Boomers. They happened to be called the Me Generation briefly over 30 years ago; that doesn't mean they are the Me Generation. It means they were called that for a while by some.

I think the confusion comes from the similarity of the names of the Me Generation and Generation Me.

It would be confusing except that, apart from that one book, no one refers to Generation X or Generation Y as "Generation Me". Generation X was briefly termed the "baby busters" due to their small relative size, but this never stuck, and Generation Y is now at least as often called "Millennial."

The author of this "Generation Me" book has attempted to create a generation that encompasses everyone born from 1970 to somewhere around 2005 or so. That is a pretty absurd size for a single generation, and it presupposes a common experience between someone my age (40) and current teens and tweens and the like, which is patently ridiculous.

Generation Xers were too young to qualify as the self-absorbed, uber-Yuppies of the 80s, and way too young to get the appellation of me during the self-help craze of the mid-70s. Those were the eras where the "Me generation" tag was floated in a pop cultural sense.

robare99
10-15-2011, 09:08 PM
Generation X


I'm 41, right in the middle of Generation X, I'm not worried about pensions, OAS etc. the boomers will all be dead by the time I retire, so it will even out.

uitar99
10-16-2011, 12:34 PM
Can't remember where I heard/read/learned of this concept but it goes something like:

Us north american humans tend to-
start spending money at about 30 years old, once we have a mate, including expenditures on housing, recreation, transportation, children including their education. We then slow down the spending as we approach retirement and end of our working lives. Seems straight forward enough.

The author of this idea suggested the great numbers of boomers were going to cause a worldwide slowdown in consumption due to looming retirement and this trend would start in 2007'ish and continue until 2018'ish when the next large group of 30 somethings start to consume in greater numbers.

As a 58 year old, I want you 20 somethings to get educated, get jobs and keep me happy in my retirement years.

Peace

uitar99
10-16-2011, 02:09 PM
So what 's the answer-I'm not sure

maybe manufacturing will come back to NA because the rich few (who by the way are not representative of anybody, just their own bank accounts) are learning that the american worker can't buy if he doesn't have a job

Zimi
10-16-2011, 03:22 PM
Greed is greed, and isn't generation specific.

You guys who are acting like the condition of the world is all the Boomers' fault are just looking for someone to blame, and you're blaming an entire generation because of a corrupt minority who are in power.

If you want to acknowledge something acknowledge that corruption and greed have been around long before the Boomers were born and will be around as long as there are people on the planet.

T.Wesley
10-16-2011, 04:53 PM
Folks - leave the politics out of it; this includes quoting or copy/pasting the Wiki article that mentions over a dozen political highlights/events in US history that define the generations.

Also, keep the discussion civil. This thread has generated enough infractions already.

coldfingaz
10-16-2011, 06:19 PM
This thread has generated enough infractions already.


Not surprising. Lots of silly stereotyping & biases seem to bring the worst out of people when it comes to defining "generations".

Honestly, I have never seen such animosity expressed towards generations outside of TGP. Every generation had/has it's fair share of greats & douchebags.

I personally have had enough great experiences with people of all ages so I really don't get the rage &/or resentment.

uitar99
10-16-2011, 07:12 PM
Seems that the age spread of a population will generate governments that tend to be populated by a cross representation of the population?

There are a lot of retiring politicians and many younger folks entering the fray.

Tough to try and criticize someone for their birthdate, when they had nothing to do with it

EricPeterson
10-16-2011, 07:31 PM
Hey guys, Remember Windows ME? I think a lot of Boomers used it.

Midnight Lady
10-16-2011, 09:23 PM
Generation X


I'm 41, right in the middle of Generation X, I'm not worried about pensions, OAS etc. the boomers will all be dead by the time I retire, so it will even out.All of us???? :eek:

Hey guys, Remember Windows ME? I think a lot of Boomers used it.Uh, no. :messedup

A-Bone
10-16-2011, 10:00 PM
All of us???? :eek:


I was born in 1970, which is the absolute nadir of the baby bust, and as a prototypical Gen Xer, I am confident that many baby boomers will still be alive when I retire.

Zimi
10-16-2011, 10:14 PM
I'm 41, right in the middle of Generation X, I'm not worried about pensions, OAS etc. the boomers will all be dead by the time I retire, so it will even out.

That's great news. I don't know if you're going to Heaven or Hell, but I'm sure there'll be enough dead Boomers in both to f* them all up before you arrive, and then you'll have something to bitch about in your afterlife.

See how it all evens out? :rotflmao

A-Bone
10-16-2011, 10:16 PM
That's great news. I don't know if you're going to Heaven or Hell, but I'm sure there'll be enough dead Boomers in both to f* them all up before you arrive, and then you'll have something to bitch about in your afterlife.

See how it all evens out? :rotflmao

:rotflmao:rotflmao:rotflmao

MuddyWolfJohnson
10-17-2011, 05:05 PM
As a 1954 boomer, the above is not adding up. The idea of "Ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country" made a heck of a lot of sense. Hardly a "me first" sentiment. Later on, what made a lot of sense was "You could have been more than a name on the door on the thirty-third floor in the air." OK, so that was definitely about "me" in the sense of fulfillment, but certainly not in the sense of greed or self-absorption. I've never considered the self-help me-first mania of the 70s to be part of my generation.

"Ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country" John F. Kennedy (5/29/1917 – 11/22/1963)

chrisr777
10-17-2011, 05:09 PM
Generation X


I'm 41, right in the middle of Generation X, I'm not worried about pensions, OAS etc. the boomers will all be dead by the time I retire, so it will even out.

Here's me really, really hoping you never retire.

tiktok
10-19-2011, 02:16 PM
"The Poor Losers Who Will Have To Pay For The Baby Boomers' Old Age" would be the most accurate label.

Indeed. Indeed. (http://www.emptyage.com/post/11591863916/generation-x-doesnt-want-to-hear-it)

Peteyvee
10-19-2011, 02:20 PM
I was born in 1970, which is the absolute nadir of the baby bust, and as a prototypical Gen Xer, I am confident that many baby boomers will still be alive when I retire.

Oh, we will, we will. If for nothing else, just to eff with the boomer haters. :DevilTrust me on this...;)

Travst
10-19-2011, 02:25 PM
As a boomer, I hear this frequently-interesting statement. There are a number of ideas circulating that go along with the statement:

There are a lot of boomers who have paid a lot of taxes for the lifestyle/society we have today, which includes retirement benefits.

There are a lot of 20/30 somethings who are going to benefit from ever increasing job vacancies as the boomers do retire. As a side note a fair number of boomers will work past their normal retirement age as they also can't retire financially.

There are also a lot of "poor losers" who are going to inherit a large swack of wealth when us boomers pass on. This didn't happen when the previous generation passed.

+1. I've paid the same taxes as everyone else since 1974 to support the preceding generation and all the other entitled groups. The idea that the boomers are ripping everyone else off is preposterous. This over-generalization regarding boomers is insulting.

tiktok
10-19-2011, 02:30 PM
I suspect that there'll be less wealth for the Boomers to pass on because rising health care costs will drain a lot of it off before it can be passed on to their kids.

rob2001
10-19-2011, 02:31 PM
Indeed. Indeed. (http://www.emptyage.com/post/11591863916/generation-x-doesnt-want-to-hear-it)

:rotflmao:rotflmao:rotflmao

A-Bone
10-19-2011, 02:34 PM
Indeed. Indeed. (http://www.emptyage.com/post/11591863916/generation-x-doesnt-want-to-hear-it)

:rotflmao:rotflmao:rotflmao

outlawyer
10-19-2011, 09:03 PM
Generation Feckless

deltaboy
10-19-2011, 10:31 PM
i tend to like "The Nintendo Generation" for my age group (20-30 year olds today).

RedRockRoy
10-19-2011, 11:36 PM
Generation SOL

RedRockRoy
10-19-2011, 11:44 PM
Generation X


I'm 41, right in the middle of Generation X, I'm not worried about pensions, OAS etc. the boomers will all be dead by the time I retire, so it will even out.I guess that depends on when you think you will retire but high percentage of folks 15 years older than you are still going to be alive when you are in your 60's.

bsuite
10-20-2011, 12:43 AM
Any of you NON Boomers want a tissue?
http://i53.tinypic.com/vy42dj.jpg

A-Bone
10-20-2011, 07:57 AM
I guess that depends on when you think you will retire but high percentage of folks 15 years older than you are still going to be alive when you are in your 60's.

More to the point, if you are 41 now the youngest boomers are only about seven years older than you.

EricPeterson
10-20-2011, 07:59 AM
I feel left out, I am only 27, :( but I listen to Boomer and Gen X Music. ;)

rmj254
10-20-2011, 08:09 AM
I feel left out, I am only 27, :( but I listen to Boomer and Gen X Music. ;)

I'm younger than you, but feel the same way. What do they call people who don't identify with their own generation?

robare99
10-20-2011, 10:22 AM
That's great news. I don't know if you're going to Heaven or Hell, but I'm sure there'll be enough dead Boomers in both to f* them all up before you arrive, and then you'll have something to bitch about in your afterlife.

See how it all evens out? :rotflmao



:idea:

davess23
10-20-2011, 10:23 AM
I referred to them as "my kids"...

hellbender
10-20-2011, 10:50 AM
I feel left out, I am only 27, :( but I listen to Boomer and Gen X Music. ;)

I consider this an oddity. In my day, when the Beatles were about, Elvis and all other rock n roll of the 50's was considered passe and downright square. Kids of today groove to music that is 40+ years old. In my time that would be like embracing the Roaring 20's. I don't understand it. 60's music was an even t for sure but what will todays kids feel nostalgic about?

deltaboy
10-20-2011, 03:56 PM
i feel heavily nostalgic about late 90's and early 2000's music as a 23 year old

I feel even more nostalgic for the golden years of Nickelodeon, with shows like Doug pulling at the heart strings

Also, the original Nintendo, early PlayStation and computer games.

Our generation is really the first true tech savvy group across the board, with almost every kid having interactions with computers from a very young age.

uitar99
10-22-2011, 11:14 AM
i feel heavily nostalgic about late 90's and early 2000's music as a 23 year old

I feel even more nostalgic for the golden years of Nickelodeon, with shows like Doug pulling at the heart strings

Also, the original Nintendo, early PlayStation and computer games.

Our generation is really the first true tech savvy group across the board, with almost every kid having interactions with computers from a very young age.

Exactly-folks relate to what they grow up with and what they like-I didn't grow up with Tony Bennett but I like him. Opeth and Tool is what my son has grown up with, but I like em. But I'm nostalgic for the 60's as that was my time.