Are Daisy Rock guitars any good?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by clintb, Feb 12, 2011.

  1. clintb

    clintb Member

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    http://www.daisyrock.com/
    They are smaller scale guitars designed for young girls.

    Have any of you tried them? Are they any good?

    My biggest concern is with the intonation. It seems like most scale scale guitars I've tried have intonation problems where chords sound out of tune. Do Daisy Rock guitars have this same problem?

    My brother-in-law said the short scale Squier Strats seem to have intonation problems too. I'm curious if that's a problem with all small scale guitars that use standard tuning.

    I had bought a Taylor GS-Mini acoustic, it sounds great. But unfortunately it turns out it really isn't all that much smaller than a full scale guitar. So it is still too big for my girls to play.
     
  2. clintb

    clintb Member

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    bump.
    Perhaps the late night crowd on the gear page may be familiar with them.
     
  3. Calloway

    Calloway Supporting Member

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    while I haven't tried any of their short scale guitars, I have tried some daisy rocks and have been blown away by the quality and tone. I once went to visit a guitar shop friend at a cover band gig of his. As I was waiting outside I thought his tone sounded awesome, when I got into the bar I saw he had borrowed a daisy rocks with butterflies on it and it sounded bad ass. I couldn't believe it, and some come with Duncans which is pretty cool.
     
  4. acwild

    acwild Supporting Member

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    I don't know if their quality is consistent but I bought one for my daughter and am very impressed with it. She picked it because it's pink sparkle.
    A bunch of things stood out for me. The neck finish feels like it's unfinished. I love that. When I turned the tuners even a tiny bit the string didn't stick. That's something I can't say about some of my more expensive guitars.
    The weight of the guitar is relatively light but unbalanced. It's headstock heavy. Plugged in the Duncans sound ok. There's even a coil-splitter.
    When I look at the details I can find that some things weren't cut perfectly. Nothing that's an issue but quality control is on par with that price range.
    Overall I'd say that it's a good guitar for your purpose. Price to quality won't impress you like a PRS SE but I wish my starter guitar was as good. Jmho.
     
  5. cjcayea

    cjcayea Supporting Member

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    yes. daisy rock is built by schecter, and schecter is one of the most consistent imported brands out there right now. we got one for my GFs little sis, and its really a pleasure to play. actually sounds okay too.
     
  6. barryg_nyc

    barryg_nyc Member

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    My daughter has two Daisy Rocks and almost bought a third.
    The short-scale ones are OK, but not great. She has the Debutante "star-shaped" one:
    http://www.daisyrock.com/products/short-scale-guitars/star/debutante-star-short-scale

    it's a decent guitar for $140 and stays in tune reasonably well for the price. The one thing that I hadn't thought about is that she mostly likes to play while seated and the star shape isn't very conducive to that (it's like a Flying V with 2 extra points added).
    She also has a cheap acoustic that a friend gave her:
    http://www.daisyrock.com/products/acoustic/pixie-acoustic/pixie-acoustic
    That's her primary guitar right now, but she's looking to upgrade for her 12th birthday. It's a decent acoustic, though it has the rounded back like an Ovation, so also is a bit awkward to play when seated.

    The one she almost bought was the best quality of the bunch. It was a full-sized Stardust Elite Isis:
    http://www.daisyrock.com/products/electric/stardust-elite-series/stardust-elite-isis
    For around $350, this was a great guitar IMO. As someone mentioned, they're a sister company to Schecter (CEO is Schecter CEO's wife) and the quality is comparable to my Schecter Diamond Series (though the Daisy Rocks are made in China, not Korea).
    While this is a full (24.75") scale guitar, it's much more playable for girls for 2 reasons:
    - Neck is narrower and very easy to play
    - Lower weight - the Isis was around 6-7 lbs so felt much more manageable than a typical strat.

    How old are your daughters? Are they looking for acoustic or electric? PM me if I can share any more details.
     
  7. cjcayea

    cjcayea Supporting Member

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    i agree w/barry about the shaped guitars. they also have a flower and a butterfly model (and maybe others) and they are tough to play while seated. the LP shaped guitars are great, though.
     
  8. acwild

    acwild Supporting Member

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    Ok, I'll admit it. When my daughter is at school, sometimes I'll play her pink sparkle Daisy Rock.:hide2
     
  9. clintb

    clintb Member

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    My daughter is 9. She wants an electric guitar. She really wants the Star-shaped guitar. I thought a star-shaped guitar would be easier to play sitting down than a Flying V. I guess I was wrong.
     
  10. harpinon

    harpinon Gold Supporting Member

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    A new store opened up here with lotsa low end gear. Lotsa Bugera, Jay Turser and Daisy rock. When nobody was lookin' I grabbed one. It was really a nice guitar. Great build, straight neck, nice intonation, tone and playability. $400. I didn't even mind the sparkly finish. I want my daughter to get into guitar so I can buy (her) one.
     
  11. acwild

    acwild Supporting Member

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    :rotflmao
    I bought my daughter hers hoping that she'd want to learn but she really only liked it for it's finish. :huh If either of my kids wanted to play guitar they'd realize that they're living in a candy shop. Unfortunately neither are showing any interest.
     
  12. barryg_nyc

    barryg_nyc Member

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    She finds it a bit tough to play sitting down. It's easier than a Flying V, because it has the other "point" of the star, so doesn't slide off your lap, but as a result the strings sit pretty low on your leg, as compared to a typical strat or LP-shaped guitar.

    that said, the reason I got her the star was that I wanted her to get excited every time she walked in the room and saw it. That worked for a little while, which I think helped keep her motivated to practice. When her friends come over, that's always the guitar they reach for.

    So, I wouldn't be scared off by it but it's probably not the most comfortable guitar to play.
     
  13. levous

    levous Member

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    I thought I'd leave some feedback as I purchased a Daisy Rock, purple acoustic guitar for my daughter's birthday. I didn't expect her to be able to play it, per se, but I expected a better-than-toy-quality instrument. It was exactly what I expected when I unboxed it.

    It plays well and looks great to a young girl's eyes. The fit and finish are no better than you'd expect from a $150 guitar but it plays fine. The action is not too high, it stays in tune and the neck is straight. Its not good enough that I might catch myself playing it rather than my own when its closer at hand.

    ...and the bad. My daughter has knocked it down a few times. I have a cheap Archer acoustic I picked up for $80 in Wisconsin when I failed to bring a guitar with me on my travels. I brought it home in the overhead with no case and have since left it in my trunk and laying around as a true beater guitar. Its still like the day I bought it. Its been dropped, stepped on, knocked over, buried, dragged and abused to no end and no damage to speak of. I use it regularly to practice scales and strumming timing when I'm waiting for one of the kids to finish their activities away from home. The Daisy Rock is less than 2 months old and cracked on the underside where the neck meets the body. I know not what the cause of this might have been but I do know it was administered by a 3 year old. It should not have cracked. The neck is still tight as the truss rod is keeping everything in line. I plan to squeeze some wood glue in there and clamp it down and I am sure, short of a noticeable glue line, it will be no worse for the wear. However, it should not have broken so easily.

    So, if the color is really important and will encourage young hands to play it, then a Daisy Rock is a good choice. Otherwise, keep your eyes peeled for a nice, used, 3/4 size guitar and pick up the first one that plays well. It will last longer.

    Daisy Rock is, in fact, a superior toy guitar.
     
  14. guitararmy

    guitararmy Supporting Member

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    I have two Daisy Rock acoustics, one short scale. Tuning issues are probably related to the scale length, not the tuners. I also strung it with 11's for ease of playing.
    I find the nuts to be a bit on the high side. I'm too lazy to try to sand them down or deepen the slots.
    I also have one of the Heartbreaker electrics with the lipstick-humbucker combo. Very cute....
     
  15. Paul-A

    Paul-A Member

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    Why would a short scale length = intonation problems? Mandolins have a much shorter scale than a guitar but I've not heard of this causing them to play out of tune. Tuning stability is something else. A short scale and light gauge strings don't go we'll together.
     
  16. dragonbat13

    dragonbat13 Member

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    I know one thing, the daisy rocks are a hit. When I first saw them I though it was dumb. I was wrong. Supposed to be a great guitar for the money.
     
  17. serial

    serial Member

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    They're surprisingly good. I played one in a local shop years ago thinking about it for my daughter. Should've grabbed it-for $150 used, it was a really nice playing and sounding electric.
     
  18. sunburst79

    sunburst79 Member

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    I've played a few at BanjoHut and was impressed. I think the quality is fine for the price and that the idea of a line of guitars with a emphasis on slim necks and light weight in order to make them more playable is a great idea. I agree that by the time your daughters out of her preteen and teen years she will probably want something with a more normal aesthetic. What's not to like?
     
  19. clintb

    clintb Member

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    I'm the original poster.

    In the end, my daughter bought a used black Squier Ministrat from her cousin (the daughter of the aforementioned brother-in-law) for $50.

    It didn't play in tune when using standard tuning. But I followed some advice on the internet and tuned it up 5 steps (E string tuned to A, A string tuned to D, etc.). Now it plays perfectly in tune. Another suggestion was to use standard tuning but with heavier strings like elevens. I haven't tried that yet.

    She was really into playing it when I was giving her lessons. But when I didn't have time to teach her, she seemed to lose interest quickly. In contrast, when I was a kid, I was much more self-motivated. I taught myself from some books and played all the time. I guess I was just into it way more than she was.

    These days she is in a performance group at her dance studio. She has dance classes for several hours on Monday through Thursday. She also does clogging and Irish dance at some other studios. So she no longer has time for music. She quit violin lessons at school and pretty much never touches her guitar.
     

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