Arpeggios

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Zappafreak, Mar 11, 2012.

  1. Zappafreak

    Zappafreak Member

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    Hello everyone at TGP,

    I'm in the process of learning the basic chords in every position possible.. Maj, Min, Dom in the E,D,B,A,G positions.... i used the CAGED method and thus i now understand and see the fretboard a lot better. In addition to this, i can also see arpeggios formed from maj min and dom chords... however, I have a hard time getting them clean, and understanding when to pull them out while playing. Any advice on practicing playing arpeggios and when to use them? Thanks
     
  2. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    There is so much music that uses arpeggios I don't know where to begin. What do you like to listen to?
     
  3. Zappafreak

    Zappafreak Member

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    Phish, Frank Zappa, Grateful Dead..... Mostly jam music, rock n roll, and jazz.. John Scofield is great as well
     
  4. jads57

    jads57 Supporting Member

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    Scott Henderson in his video shows how to use Maj 7 , Min9 maj 3rd (melodic minor) and Min 7 b5 arpeggios against different bass roots. Very enlightening!
    I practice these 3 arpeggios in all 12 keys plus dimished and whole tone scales every day.
     
  5. purestmonk

    purestmonk Member

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    when you start to be familiar with where the triads and arpeggios are, I would suggest that you cycle them like Cm, Fm, Bb .. maybe one measure of each? this way, you can start to call up these arpeggios faster .. also use them in tunes or you can create your own progressions, start with 2 chords then expand from there
     
  6. GaryOz

    GaryOz Member

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    The real value in arpeggios is not whizzing through them like an exercise. Arpeggios give you chord tones and wider intervals that you can incorporate into your solos so that your improvisation over changes has structure and makes harmonic sense. So try to use the arpeggio notes of each chord in a progression in different combinations and integrate them into your lines.
    Hope this helps.
    Gary
     
  7. cardamonfrost

    cardamonfrost Member

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    You Enjoy Myself by Phish.

    C
     
  8. StevenA

    StevenA Silver Supporting Member

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    WWJD
    What Would Jerry Do?
     
  9. gennation

    gennation Member

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    Check out the intro the Sir Duke by Stevie Wonder is triads.

    The main motif in the song In The Mood by Glenn Miller is triads.
     
  10. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    Peaches and Regelia
    400 years of classical music
    Coleman Hawkins' solo on Body and Soul
    The Animals version of House of the Rising Sun
    Because by The Beatles
    and so on and so forth
    Good for you for working on them as they are an important component to playing music.
     
  11. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    Dave Gilmour's first solo on "Comfortably Numb" by Pink Floyd is a simple, yet effective example of arpeggio usage that you can study. It's just root, 3rd, 5th of the chord when he arpeggiates.

    If you want to learn how to use arpeggios, one way is to learn real solos, and real melodies and study how arpeggios are used in them. That's the time-proven method.
     
  12. flavaham

    flavaham Member

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    Start by playing them slowly, but deliberately. I listen to and play exactly the music that you listed (maybe we jam some time if you're near Denver?). Play the changes. When playing the progression, rather than strumming, arpeggiate the chords. Next time the progression comes around, make sure you are playing the chords at a different spot. To do this, you need to learn MANY different voicings for each chord.

    You don't need speed for arpeggios. You just need to NOT play a wrong note. b7 over Emaj7 SUCKS!! DON'T DO IT!! haha.

    Basically, start super basic and eventually you'll find new licks that work and will be able to smoke it!
     
  13. AndyNOLA

    AndyNOLA Member

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    If you want to know what Jerry would do, learn the mixolydian mode, and take it from there.....when you can hear it, then you will know the tune I am talking about.
     
  14. Elev8

    Elev8 Member

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    ^Word. They are a great tool for phrasing solos across chord transitions, as opposed to 'playing the changes' if that makes sense.
     
  15. AndyNOLA

    AndyNOLA Member

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    Oh yeah, just learn your octaves, and learn how to make your triads and arpeggios on all these. Start with G and find all the G's on the next so you can hit them them without looking. Begin with the G's at the third fret on both E strings. The jump to the G on the D string, then over to the B, and work your way down the neck, making triads all over.

    Then run scales through these positions. I know it sounds simpistic, but it will really open things up for you. Make your guitar a keyboard.
     
  16. Seraphine

    Seraphine Member

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    Hey Zap

    Running scales and modes helps... and look into string skipping... Then there's breaking arps up so they aren't "boxed" .. link them over the entire fretboard so you can use them to end up where you want on the fretboard, for continuing with phrases etc.

    Think of the right hand as drawing a very straight line across the strings for sweeps... for 3 strings the wrists does well for more use the whole hand/arm, moving with intent to play the statement.

    Working with arps will probably bring sweep picking into light... Many use slides and hammers in places, which is alright for expressing different sound or variety, yet learn to hit each note pure and clean first... then take the nuances on board.

    Zappafreak... did you listen to "Help On The Way/Slipknot" for dorian?
     

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