Best Princeton Reverb Clone?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by safecracker, May 28, 2007.

  1. safecracker

    safecracker Member

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    Any opinions on who produces the most authentic,best sounding reproduction of a blackface princeton reverb? Originals are out of my budget. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Steve Dallas

    Steve Dallas Member

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    A clone will cost > $1000. The parts alone will cost about $800, plus you will need to think about paying a good builder to spend the time to make it right. I would put it at $1200 minumum if you can find a builder willing to work for $400.

    To justify the labor, figure it will take about 10 hours to build an amp of this type as a one-off plus testing, burn-in, tone tweaking, and any troubleshooting time. So maybe 12 hours of total build time? That's half what most amp techs charge to work on an amp and is pretty low for an experienced builder.

    I've seen some good specimens of the real thing going for $1500. Maybe it's worth it to save a little while and get a real one?
     
  3. Jon Silberman

    Jon Silberman 10Q Jerry & Dickey Gold Supporting Member

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    The PR is one of the Fenders that went virtually unchanged from BF to SF. Have you considered a more reasonably priced SF PR? If the BF front is important to you, you can cop a replacement faceplate for $75 or so.
     
  4. Kingofdogs1950

    Kingofdogs1950 Member

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    Allen Sweet Spot (or the kit version, V-18).
    I don't know your budget but Allen amps are top quality and priced fairly. Never played a Sweet Spot but I own an Allen Accomplice, Hot Fudge/w Nuts and 5f1+.

    Mark
     
  5. Texsunburst59

    Texsunburst59 Member

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    s2amps is right on the money. I have a local amp guy that has built some Fender clones for me and also restored some beaters. The Blonde PR was a '70 chassis that he built the whole cab around. The Blonde DR is a built from scractch repro he repro and the '62 was a chassis he restored for me.. The PR cost me $925,DR $1200, and the Bassman was $850 I'd try to find a SF beater and try to have a good amp guy restore it for you.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  6. GenoBluzGtr

    GenoBluzGtr Silver Supporting Member

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    Clark Kanee Reverb, Headstrong Li'l King are right on the money, but a new one will cost you btw 1600 and 1800 dollars.

    Allen Sweet Spot gets all the raves (not really a clone, it has some improvements/mods so it's tone will be a touch different) ant runs around 1450 - 1500 new.

    Those are the top three in the PR Clone market. it's simply a very desirable tone to produce. A vintage will run you about 1200 - 1800 depending upon condition, and figure on adding a couple hundred in check-ups, cap jobs, new tubes/ac cord, etc....

    Bottom line.... PR tone will cost you between 1200 - 2000 . A nice silver face is a great option, although those prices are already breaching the grand mark.
     
  7. spikeRI

    spikeRI Member

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    what about the weber kit?
     
  8. 60HzShuffle

    60HzShuffle Member

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  9. teleamp

    teleamp Senior Member

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    SDG Vintage does a nice one at a reasonable price. The clips sound awesome.

    Mike
     
  10. 60HzShuffle

    60HzShuffle Member

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    It is a great amp. I actually live in Woodstock, but Woodstock Reverb did not sound near as cool. You can get the faceplate customized to whatever name you want, except PR.
     
  11. karmadave

    karmadave Member

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    Check your PM. I have one that I'd let go at a very reasonable price...
     
  12. Dave LaP

    Dave LaP Member

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    I have two Lil King Princeton Clones by Headstrong. I love 'em, obviously.

    I like the fact that they are hand built, extremely well made, sound great, and don't require any tweaking, retubing, new speakers, new baffles, 3 prong cords, etc.. that you find pretty often on existing Fender PR's.

    I understand that the Fenders are better from an investment standpoint but I'm a player and just want something thats bullet proof sounds great and doesn't require a lot of tweaking to sound the way I want.
     
  13. 60HzShuffle

    60HzShuffle Member

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    That's why I like the SDG's. Call Steve and he might make you a deal.:AOK
     
  14. Bryan T

    Bryan T Guitar Owner Silver Supporting Member

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    Really? I'll admit that I know very little about the price of parts needed, but $800 seems very high for such a simple amp. What are the high cost items needed?

    Bryan
     
  15. WesKuhnley

    WesKuhnley Member

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    http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showpost.php?p=2538000&postcount=4

    When building a clone, the expensive components are the iron, metalwork, cab and speaker(s) and reverb tank. Leaving only the components themselves and the labor. A good one-off PR clone will cost a builder $800-1000 or so, including labor, so expect to pay $1500 for custom work like that. Production amps, even small-run pieces cost quite a bit less due to the fact that much of the work involved in sourcing parts, labor etc, is combined between multiple units.
     
  16. Steve Dallas

    Steve Dallas Member

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    The best way to do something like this is as a kit. Mojo makes a great little PR kit (I've built a couple of them). Quality is right up there with the real thing.

    http://www.mojomusicalsupply.com/products.asp?id=44991

    It's > $1000 unless you're a dealer, in which case it's a little cheaper. That plus the aforementioned $400 labor from a very motivated builder aiming to prove his worth, puts you in the ballpark of an old one.

    If you want to do it the old fashioned way (as many parts out of a builder's stock as possible) and want it to look like the real thing, you can figure:

    Chassis: $75
    Iron: 135
    Cabinet: 250
    Speaker: 100
    Filter Caps: 30
    Small Parts 100
    Face Plates 50
    -----------------
    $740

    Labor $400
    Shipping 40
    -----------------
    $1180

    Back in the same ballpark--I'm sure I undershot it off the top of my head. Might as well go with a kit.

    If you don't care how it looks and are willing to cut some corners, you can save some $$ on the chassis, face plates, cabinet, etc. It will still sound right if you builder is capable enough, but the end result usually leaves something to be desired IMHO.
     
  17. Bryan T

    Bryan T Guitar Owner Silver Supporting Member

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    Thanks for breaking that down, though I'm sure economies of scale could apply to some of those parts, no?

    Out of curiosity, how many labor hours go into wiring/testing an amp?

    Bryan
     
  18. Steve Dallas

    Steve Dallas Member

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    I would guess about 12 hours for a one-off amp. If it is someone's regular model and they build a lot of them, it could be done in about 4 hours.

    Yes, economy of scale does play into it. If someone were to build 10 of them, he could get a big price break on chassis, transformers, etc. and bring the price down maybe $100-200.

    Incidentally, I have a little Princeton Amp head I built about 4 years ago and have never really played I could let go for about $800 if you are interested (although I never intended this thread to turn into spam).

    Not trying to be a jerk. Just trying to point out that having an amp built is pretty pricey unless you can find someone like Richter making a lot of the same model like she does with 5E3s.
     
  19. teleamp

    teleamp Senior Member

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    s2 is right on the money. I am getting ready to build a couple of PR type amps for a client, after crunching numbers we decided to go with Allen Amps V-18 kits. The price is just a little higher than cherry picking parts, and the Allen has a few more features.

    I take my time, 12 - 14 hours for assembly, then I like to "burn the amps in" for about 10 - 20 hours before delivering the amp to the customer.

    Mike Yankie
    Texas Tube Amplifier Company
    www.texastubeamps.com
     
  20. r9player

    r9player Member

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    Princeton Reverb SF are great amps.
    But else check out www.chandleramps.com
    you'll find his pricing really reasonable.
     

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