Heritage H-150 questions: tenon, weight-relief...

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by hear and play, Feb 22, 2006.

  1. hear and play

    hear and play Member

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    I've got some cork sniffer questions about the Heritage H-150. I'm NOT assuming that these features affect tone.

    Does the H-150 have a long tenon?
    Am I correct that it has no weight relief (holes, chambers or other)?
    Do all H-150s have 1-piece bodies and 1-piece necks (save the headstock "ears")?
    Heritage finsihes are NC lacquer, correct?
    Any comments on the bridge and tailpiece? I know that they can be ordered with TM/Gibson-like tail, but I kinda like the looks of the Heritage hardware.

    Thanks in advance...
     
  2. hear and play

    hear and play Member

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  3. THROBAK

    THROBAK Gold Supporting Member

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    I do know that they will weight relief bodies on request but do not do it as a standard practice. They do not chamber the H150 but do chamber the Millennium. I have seen H150's with 2 piece backs but most seem to be 1 piece.
     
  4. bailnout

    bailnout Member

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    I have an H150 Class of '59 so the observations of mine may not help you with what you are looking for but here goes:

    I don't think they normally do but mine may because it's their version of a '59 reissue. I'll look when I get home and let you know.

    Mine doesn't have those things. It's a solid body.

    Mine is actually a three piece neck. It's two large pieces of korina with a thin stripe of something else (probably mahogany) up the middle. The body is one piece of korina with a two piece book matched flame top.
    [​IMG]

    Mine is definitely nitro.

    Mine came with Gibson style hardware but I switched it to Tone Pros. The switch yielded slightly more sustain and even sounding tone. Not a huge difference on this particular guitar with that switch so I don't know that I would recommend it for the price to everyone in every situation with just any guitar. I have found that the better the guitar is built in the first place, the less of a difference the Tone Pros hardware makes.
     
  5. hear and play

    hear and play Member

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    Thanks for the responses.

    Looking forward to hearing about the tenon in your '59, bailnout. How much does she weigh?
     
  6. Hendrix95

    Hendrix95 Member

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    Mine is really light and is somewhere between 8-8.5 lbs. Although most are one piece backs, mine is a 2 piece, however I don't really think this matters. It sounds and plays better than any other guitar I've played. I'm sure you could request one with a one piece back if its important to you though. You could even have Heritage just build you one to your specs if you want. I'd contact Jay Wolfe at www.wolfeguitars.com He's the biggest Heritage dealer and is great to deal with. Seems to have the best prices and selection too. I also think he tends to get the lightest ones. I've heard that he uses South American mahogany on all his. Is this true?
     
  7. bailnout

    bailnout Member

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    I didn't have a chance last night to check that tenon for you (working on problems with my OD-100). I'll try to get to it again tonight.

    As far as the weight, it's pretty light. Not sure what the actual weight is but it's the lightest of all my Les Pauls. I'm betting that korina has something to do with it.
     
  8. hawkeyeinexile

    hawkeyeinexile Silver Supporting Member

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    ...plus the nice thing about Heritage is you can call them up, too, and talk to Jim Deurloo or one of the other owners, which is kinda like talking to Gibson history.

    :cool:
     
  9. hear and play

    hear and play Member

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    Your Heritage into a OD-100. That must sound really mediocre. :AOK
     
  10. bailnout

    bailnout Member

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    Yea, I don't have it bad right now that's for sure. I'm just bumming that the OD-100 is on the fritz right now. So, alass... I must resort to playing through the Bogner Ecstasy 101b...*sigh*

    To be honest, the Heritage is my #2. My #1 is my totally custom built J.Nunis who's design was inspired by the Heritage. It has a one piece limba neck and one piece limba body (in fact, those two pieces came from the same board). The top is just ripping with flame and it has a string though the body design instead of the stop tail.

    Well whatta ya know?!?! Lookie here! I have a picture of the two of them together!
    [​IMG]
    These two guitars are neck and neck. Pretty interchangeable tone wise. Both have Duncans. Both will go from kiss-you-gently-on-the-lips to RIPYOUR****INGHEADOFF on a dime. One of the main things the Nunis has over the Heritage is the ability to go single coil. But then the Heritage get that Santana neck sound that I can't get as well with the Nunis.
     
  11. bluesbreaker59

    bluesbreaker59 Supporting Member

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    My Heritage 150CM, was purchased from Wolfe over three years ago. Mine has the following features:

    1 piece Honduras mahogany neck
    1 piece Honduras mahogany body
    Brazilian rosewood fingerboard
    2 piece flame maple top
    Short tenon
    Duncan Antiquities
    Gibson style stop tail and bridge
    Tobacco sunburst finish
    Weighs in at just under 8.5 lbs (no weight relief holes)

    Ordered through Jay Wolfe for $1250

    Its the best Les Paul type guitar I've ever played or heard (in person) in my entire life, of coure I'm also a little partial. I call her "Old Faithful", and I wouldn't sell that guitar for any amount of money, its coming to the grave with me.

    Heritage can do long neck tenons, I believe the upcharge was like $150 when I ordered mine. I don't regret not having it, its no big deal to me, this guitar has plenty of tone for me.;)
     
  12. ChazMania

    ChazMania Silver Supporting Member

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    Just finished a total hardware overhaul on my H157. The original Schaller hardware was rusted and peeling. I bought this new in 99. Just changed the keys to Grovers, Suhr pickups (the ssh+ in the bridge SMOKES!!) and a tonepros bridge and tailpiece. I forgot how much I love this neck, it's a sweet fiddle.......it has more yellow/gold color in the burst than come through in the pics.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  13. bailnout

    bailnout Member

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    Chaz, that is one sahweeeet guitar. Photos nicely. Did you notice a tone improvement with the Tone Pros? I've found it affects some guitars more than others .
     
  14. GuitarsFromMars

    GuitarsFromMars Member

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    I had an H150CM with a 10 top,one of the 1st sets of Seth Lovers,PIO caps,500K pots,Gibson Nashville bridge with a LWTP,even put Historic knobs on it-I gotta tell ya-when I got my R7 Stinger that guitar didn't stand a chance-they do NOT sound to my ear like a Les Paul Historic RI-Sorry.
     
  15. bailnout

    bailnout Member

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    Yea but I wouldn't hold that against the RI. ;)

    Not an apples to apples comparison when one cost twice as much as the other IMO.
     
  16. GuitarsFromMars

    GuitarsFromMars Member

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    I used to think that they SHOULD sound alike-but they do not-The long tenon,etc. make an unusual difference and give the LP a sonic advantage that is remarkable.If bang for the buck is an issue,Yes,buy an H150-but if you want a real legendary instrument that has arguably produced some of the greatest recorded guitar tones ever-Buy a USED Gibson Les Paul.
     
  17. Hendrix95

    Hendrix95 Member

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    Here's mine:

    [​IMG]

    It has the grain patterns of both a plaintop and flametop and the flame sort of changes depending on the angle under the light.
     
  18. bailnout

    bailnout Member

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    Yea, my H150 doesn't sound exactly like any of my Les Pauls. It kicks all of their asses...hard. And that's saying something because I feel I have some exceptional sounding Gibsons. They are all in the same sonic ballpark though. You wouldn't listen to the Heritage and say it sounds like a Strat or a Tele or a Gretch. You would think it sounded Les Paulish.

    And I don't feel it's fair to compare my Gibsons to my Heritage because the my Heritage has a limba neck and back as apposed to mahogany. I believe (for my tastes anyway) that limba is sonicly superior to mahogany. So to my ear the Heritage has an unfair advantage in a head to head comparison. But I love each of my Gibsons for what they are, not disliking them for what they aren't.

    I checked my tenon on the H150 Class of '59 last night. It's short. I find that interesting because weren't the Class of '59 models supposed to be Heritage's answer to the Gibson '59 reissues? And didn't Gibson use a long tenon in '59? You'da thunk Heritage would have used that construction method for that run.

    I've heard from a number of builders that the tenon length between a short length Gibson tenon and what is considered a long Gibson tenon doesn't really make any difference. The important thing is that the fit of the tenon in the mortise is super tight from side to side. I don't think I personally believe that thought because I have pretty consistently preferred long tenon single cutaway guitars to the short ones. I still like a well made Gibson Les Paul no matter the tenon length. I just find that for the most part, long tenons sound a little better.

    For example, the J.Nunis that I have that is also a limba neck and back with an eastern flamed maple top sounds slightly better than my H150 and sustains forever. The Nunis has the long tenon. It also has a string through body design which (in my opinion) give it another sonic advantage.

    I will agree with you GFM that if you want a Gibson Les Paul, buy a Gibson Les Paul. And on the used market is the way to go. And you are right, bang for the buck would have to go to the Heritage. Especially on the used market as well.
     
  19. ChazMania

    ChazMania Silver Supporting Member

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    Well, acoustically, it seems a little warmer perhaps. It had been a month or so since I had removed all the hardware, so I didn't have a quick change to hear immediate differences. I can say that the Suhr pups are much more throaty, and have way more depth than the original pups.
     
  20. vinni

    vinni Member

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    Within two weeks I will try out some 150's
    One of those is a 20th ann model.

    I definetly dig the Old Style Burst finish !
    Oh yeah....I already have an H353 Almond burst.

    [​IMG]

    Vinni
     

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