Installing a pre slotted Tusq Nut

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by tone?, Apr 21, 2011.

  1. tone?

    tone? Supporting Member

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    i recently installed a bone nut blank and filed the slots from the top.

    they say on the Tusq website for pre slotted nuts to sand down the bottom of the nut to get the desired height.
    how on earth can that work??

    even if you want to you cant sand the bottom for it to have a straight flat sitting bottom

    doesnt it need to be brought down from the top instead?
     
  2. bynapkinart

    bynapkinart Member

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    You have to sand down the base evenly so that the nut gets shorter and shorter, thus getting the action to the correct height. If you sand the top down the slots will just get shorter and shorter, making the strings pop out. Of course, if you're sanding down the slots as well, you're defeating the reason for a preslotted nut.
     
  3. tone?

    tone? Supporting Member

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    ok,

    agreed, but how do you do this so its even???

    its almost impossible
     
  4. Tidewater Custom Shop

    Tidewater Custom Shop Performance Enhancing Guitarworks Gold Supporting Member

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    Nah... be slow and sure. It'll call for a lot of removal and replacement of the nut in it's slot, popping the E's in their repsective slots to check their height relationship to the first couple frets..

    Place your 220 grit on a flat surface, like a piece of marble (you got some of that, right?) or another known super flat surface. You gotta finesse the nut (watch it!) so that when you drag it across the sand paper you apply equal pressure while making sure you're holding the bottom perfectly flat, and the back edge at 90 degrees to the flat surface.

    It'll take a few passes to get it right... and if you have a radius'd nut slot you're screwed with that method.

    I prefer filing the slots to depth from the top measuring with feeler gauges and a micrometer. They're worth the investment if you intend to do nut work a lot. But without those measuring tools, the above method will get you there... slowly, but surely.

    This vid may help. This guy uses a flat file rather than a flat surface and sandpaper. Depends on how much material you have to remove, but the point is illustrated here.

     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2011

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