One of my Favourite things - putting the Christmas Pudding On

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by MrAstro, Nov 16, 2013.

  1. MrAstro

    MrAstro Supporting Member

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    Every year about this time I make the Christmas Pudding Mix, dump the mixture including overly generous glugs of brandy into a floured pudding cloth. You tie the pudding up with strong string (I use nylon multi braided stuff these days)...

    I boil up an ancient copper (originally used pre war for boiling washing) and boil the pudding for about 7 hours. You hang the pudding for over a month and then boil it for another 2 hours before removing the cloth.

    Best bit of the process is testing the mix :)

    Our family has been doing this as far as I know since about WW1 and maybe longer that I don't know about.

    Just thought I'd share that - I always get excited about making the pudding for some reason :aok :banana
     
  2. 67mike

    67mike Senior Member

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    What is in this pudding?
     
  3. MadFrank

    MadFrank Gold Supporting Member

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    Heaven.

    The best thing about Christmas, IMO. :drool

    My aunt makes ours every year (or there is hell to pay!). Family recipe that goes back 4 or 5 generations. Nothing different or unusual about ours, but it's home-made with care and attention a couple of months before the big day, and that makes all the difference. I'm starting to drool now....
     
  4. Glowing Tubes

    Glowing Tubes Gold Supporting Member

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    Yeah, can you give a better description of this? I've never heard of this "pudding"
     
  5. ShavenYak

    ShavenYak Member

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    Sounds like way too much trouble. But then again I'm too lazy to make instant pudding. Pudding cups for me.
     
  6. MadFrank

    MadFrank Gold Supporting Member

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    Do you not have Christmas pudding in America?

    [​IMG]
     
  7. MrAstro

    MrAstro Supporting Member

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    OK - here's the 'secret' family recipe - enjoy!

    1/2 pound plain flour
    1/2 pound stale breadcrumbs (real bread - not the dry packet mix..
    pinch of salt
    1 pound butter
    1 pound brown sugar
    1 pound currants
    1 pound sultanas
    1/2 pound citron peel
    1/2 pound raisins
    9 eggs
    1 gill brandy (1/4 pint)
    1/2 tsp nutmeg
    1/4 pound glace cherries
    1 level dspsn mixed spice
    1 level tsp bicarb of soda

    Cream the butter and sugar, add well beaten eggs and brandy. Stir all fruit in well. Add breadcrumbs, salt, sifted flour, bicarb of soda, grated nutmeg and mixed spice.

    Mix all ingredients together well.
    Tie up in a very strong pudding cloth (linen), allowing room for it to swell (I actually tie the pudding cloth fairly tight over the ingredients - i.e. don't let the cloth be too loose)).. Place in a copper of boiling water and cook for 6 hours on the day that is made and 3 hours on the day it is to be served.

    Extra hints from me... Flour the cloth and use butter wrappers before dumping the mix onto the cloth. Shape the pudding in a large bowl and place some baking paper on the top before tying the pudding up). Use strong nylon cord to tie pudding using multiple wraps of cord to make the pudding fairly tight in the cloth - but not too tight....

    I found a picture of a cloth boiled pudding - looks something like this:

    [​IMG]

    Some people do them in a basin - they look a bit more like MadFrank's picture.

    You can tell it's a pretty old recipe - it was weird typing it with pounds, furlongs on fathoms because we are metric these days :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2013
  8. Frankee

    Frankee Low-rent hobbyist Gold Supporting Member

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    You mean fruitcake?
     
  9. popinvasion

    popinvasion Supporting Member

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    Never had or heard of it. What makes it pudding? Sounds like an aged cake??
     
  10. MadFrank

    MadFrank Gold Supporting Member

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    No, that's Christmas Cake.
     
  11. MrAstro

    MrAstro Supporting Member

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    Yeah MadFrank is spot on.

    Fruit Cakes are baked.

    Christmas Puddings are boiled.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2013
  12. Frankee

    Frankee Low-rent hobbyist Gold Supporting Member

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    Let me guess......

    It looks like pudding? Right?
     
  13. MrAstro

    MrAstro Supporting Member

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    Well it looks rather cake-like actually - but it's a lot moister than a cake and more dense.

    A lot of people would eat it with hot custard or brandy custard. Ice cream is also optional.

    Personally outside Christmas day it is absolutely amazing having a slice with a cup of tea. It is rich moist and delicious.
     
  14. amigo30

    amigo30 Member

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    I like you Brits. Your recipes make sense.

    None of that 2ml or 9.8 grams nonsense. I'm sure that makes the pudding taste better.
     
  15. spyeman

    spyeman Supporting Member

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    You are wasting your time trying to educate these uncouth Yanks. They have never tasted the miracle of Spotted Dick, or Treacle Tarts, or the wonderful Christmas pud covered in Birds custard...........they know not of these delights.......
     
  16. Jesus freak

    Jesus freak Supporting Member

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    This is new to me, but it looks delicious.
     
  17. MadFrank

    MadFrank Gold Supporting Member

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    Part of the recipe is that you soak it in brandy over a period of time while it matures. You don't drown it, but a dram of brandy once a week for a month or two is the norm. Traditionally, some cooks like to start the pudding in January for the following Christmas, but a good month is fine for most.

    When it is served, you heat up a small amount of brandy, then pour over the pud and set it alight. It goes up in flames for a few seconds and everyone 'Oooh's and Ahh's'. It's just for show and tradition really. The proof is in the pudding!

    In England, another tradition was to put a coin in the pudding. Something that a lucky child would get in their bowl. I think 'Elf and Safety' kinda nix that idea nowadays. Besides it's dirty and kids now don't see it as any big whoop to get a pound coin covered in custard anyway.
     
  18. VCuomo

    VCuomo Silver Supporting Member

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    In the USA, when someone says "pudding" something like this is what most people are referring to:


    [​IMG]

    Your confection looks delicious and is similar to what we call "fruitcake", which is baked instead of boiled:
    [​IMG]
     
  19. 2leod

    2leod Re-Member Gold Supporting Member

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    We had some sticky toffee pudding a few weeks ago, very rich but delicious!
     
  20. MrAstro

    MrAstro Supporting Member

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    Absolutely! I should have mentioned that we pour some brandy over it when it comes out of the cloth. I know you can set it alight - but we don't bother. It just soaks into the pudding and makes it even more lethal :)

    When I was kid my mum and dad baked sixpences in it - whoever got one supposedly won and had good luck. You had to be careful you didn't bite one by mistake or swallow them :)

    They were Australian sixpences - pre-decimal currency ie. pre 1966. I was a little kid in the 70's so they must have saved the sixpences especially for the pudding. The post decimal sixpence in Australia was the 5 cent piece - about the same size - but obviously doesn't have the same tradition about it...
     

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