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  #1  
Old 06-30-2011, 09:21 AM
JasO JasO is offline
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Duane Allman: The 1981 Pete Carr Interview

A renowned studio guitarist and solo artist, Pete Carr was there the night Duane Allman was inspired to learn slide guitar. At the time, Pete was bassist in the Hour Glass, Duane and Gregg's final lineup before the Allman Brothers Band. He and Duane were sharing an apartment in Los Angeles. One evening they chanced to see Taj Mahal perform at a local club. Taj’s guitarist, Jesse Ed Davis, bottlenecked through a rip-roaring band version of Blind Willie McTell’s “Statesboro Blues.” According to Pete, Duane instantly became obsessed with mastering both the style and the song, which he’d transform into the Allman Brothers’ signature tune. Pete’s time playing alongside Duane was short-lived – about a year – but resulted in two memorable projects: the Hour Glass’ The Power of Love album, and the stellar “B.B. King Medley” that begins Duane Allman: An Anthology. They remained friends until Duane’s death in 1971.

A decade later, I interviewed Pete while putting together my Guitar Player magazine cover story on Duane Allman. Bits of the conversation were assembled into a small feature, but interview itself was never published. I've just transcribed it and posted it on my website. Pete has some interesting insights on Duane's time in Greenwich Village with the Allman Joys, the Taj Mahal-Jesse Ed Davis connection, the breakup of the Hour Glass, the changes in Duane's style, and his personality. If you're interested in seeing it, it's posted here: http://jasobrecht.com/duane-allman-1981-pete-carr-interview/
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Old 06-30-2011, 09:38 AM
guitarz1972 guitarz1972 is offline
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Great interview and write-up, Jas! Getting up-close with a contemporary of Duane like that really makes your work a part of music's historic archive, IMO. Thanks so much for sharing it.

- Chris
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Old 06-30-2011, 09:42 AM
mannish mannish is offline
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He copped Jess Ed on Statesboro for sure
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Old 06-30-2011, 10:05 AM
Neer Neer is offline
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Jas, thanks for another fine interview. I've always enjoyed your work.

I was wondering if I could ask you how to record a telephone interview? I'm doing a series of phone interviews and I need to know the best way to record them. I'm not certain if I'll be using a mobile phone or a land line. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 06-30-2011, 10:54 AM
mannish mannish is offline
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I have done countless interviews. I used the basic suction cup thing on landline into a recorder. I am sure there are better ways now. It only failed once and that was a John Hammond interview - I forgot to push record

I have interviewed a lot folks including Ronnie Earl, Pete Welding, Rod Piazza, Paul Size, Jimmy Rogers, Johnny Copeland, RL Burnside, Doug MacLeod, Charles Brown (several times), Peter Guralnick, James Peterson, Sam Lay, Hubert Sumlin' Kenny Neal, Raful Neal....etc

The only person that ever turned me down for an interview was Rory Block




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Originally Posted by Neer View Post
Jas, thanks for another fine interview. I've always enjoyed your work.

I was wondering if I could ask you how to record a telephone interview? I'm doing a series of phone interviews and I need to know the best way to record them. I'm not certain if I'll be using a mobile phone or a land line. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 06-30-2011, 11:15 AM
JasO JasO is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neer View Post
Jas, thanks for another fine interview. I've always enjoyed your work.

I was wondering if I could ask you how to record a telephone interview? I'm doing a series of phone interviews and I need to know the best way to record them. I'm not certain if I'll be using a mobile phone or a land line. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.
I used the suction cup early on, but they tend to have a noisy signal and after a while you have to physically hold it against the earpiece as you speak. As the suction fades, the voice becomes really hard to hear.

The best system I know of -- and I've been using it for 33 years -- is an old plug-the-wire-into-the-wall Touch-Tone desktop phone. The Touch-Tone keys have to be on the main unit that sits on the desk, not the part you hold up to your ear and mouth. You can find these phones for a few bucks on eBay. Then get an inexpensive Radio Shack Mini Recorder Control, Cat. No. 43-1237, and connect this between the body of the phone and the curled line that runs into the part you use to speak and listen. This adapter has a line out that goes into the recorder. Works like a charm every time, and produces a strong, clear signal.

BTW, if you try it with a phone that has the dial or Touch-Tone keys in the part you hold up to your head, you'll get an awful sound that's nearly impossible to transcribe. To find the phone I used today, I just sent an email out to my neighbors asking if anyone had an old phone stored away. Two turned up within a few minutes. These land-line phones also work during power outtages.

Hope this helps!
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Old 06-30-2011, 11:38 AM
mannish mannish is offline
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The transcribing was always the dreaded part for me, especially some of the older blues guys.
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Old 06-30-2011, 12:03 PM
JasO JasO is offline
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Originally Posted by mannish View Post
The transcribing was always the dreaded part for me, especially some of the older blues guys.
Do you use a transcribing machine with a foot control? My Panasonic RR-830 is great. I always make a digital safety copy, though, before I transcribe a tape. And once I'm finished, I always listen to the entire tape a second time as I proofread -- it's amazing how much stuff can be missed or misinterpreted on the first pass.
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Old 06-30-2011, 12:16 PM
Neer Neer is offline
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I appreciate the information, thank you! I have a Sony TCM5000EV which would be pretty killer for this application.

Jas, I am conducting a few interviews for my blog and my first thought was that I wanted them to resemble in some ways the fine Guitar Player pieces you've done. Thanks.
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Old 06-30-2011, 01:05 PM
MightyGuru MightyGuru is offline
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Pete Carr...cool. He's from around here. I actually had him in freshman English back in the 80s...he wasn't a freshman though.
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Old 06-30-2011, 01:46 PM
darkstar11 darkstar11 is offline
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Thanks JasO.
Really enjoy all the interviews you have done and posted!
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Old 06-30-2011, 01:58 PM
Dave2512 Dave2512 is offline
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One thing for sure Duane wasn't alone in his admiration for Jesse Ed Davis. Whatever "it" is that guy had it, great guitarist.
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Old 06-30-2011, 02:03 PM
tsar nicholas tsar nicholas is offline
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Molto awesome! There's a real art to asking the right questions.
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Old 06-30-2011, 02:06 PM
RobertMiller RobertMiller is offline
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Thanks Jas - great to have guys like you posting - it makes my day when I check in and catch stuff like this....
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Old 06-30-2011, 02:21 PM
John H John H is offline
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It's hard to believe that Duane died nearly 40 years ago. I saw him, with the ABB (at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium), a few weeks before the accident. It's still my favorite all-time concert. They were on fire!

Jas, thanks, so much, for sharing your interview archives with us.
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