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1959 - 1960 : Which album was the ultimate groundbreaker in Jazz - Poll

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by el greco, Feb 10, 2019.

Which album was the most important in introducing new forms in Jazz?

  1. Miles Davis - Kind Of Blue

    73 vote(s)
    57.9%
  2. John Coltrane - Giant Steps

    17 vote(s)
    13.5%
  3. Dave Brubeck Quartet - Time Out

    19 vote(s)
    15.1%
  4. Bill Evans Trio - Portrait In Jazz

    1 vote(s)
    0.8%
  5. Ornette Coleman - The Shape Of Jazz To Come

    12 vote(s)
    9.5%
  6. Charles Mingus - Mingus Ah Um

    3 vote(s)
    2.4%
  7. Duke Ellington - Anatomy Of A Murder

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  8. Miles Davis - Sketches Of Spain

    1 vote(s)
    0.8%
  1. el greco

    el greco Member

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    1959 - 1960 were "The Years". Bird was already gone. Jazz was breaking away from complex bebop into new forms, allowing musicians remarkable freedom to explore and express themselves.
    Phenomenal albums were made, each a high point for the artists and a compelling reflection of the times. Each introduced exciting new possibilities for jazz which continue to be felt today.
    As musicians, when exploring the innovative jazz albums and contributions of '59 - '60, the years that changed music, which album would you pick as the ultimate groundbreaker in Jazz?
    For me and after a lot of thought, it would be "The Shape of Jazz to Come", as it opened up a whole new world, taking improvisation to the next level...but that is just me.
    It would be very interesting to find out how The Gear Page feels about this great time in music! You only get one choice!
    I do apologise if I've left out an album that you believe deserves to be among these greats!
     
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  2. marvin cobain

    marvin cobain Member

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    While those are very great albums, i don't see Mingus Ah Um, Anatomy of a murder, Time out or Sketches of Spain as particularly groundbreaking. And Giant steps besides Naima was still hard bop. So probably Kind of Blue and The shape of jazz to come were the two most influential albums (altough both modal and free did exist before those albums). I'd probably say Kind of blue overall, because for Ornette Coleman there were other albums before that were already showing his approach.
     
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  3. Seth L

    Seth L Silver Supporting Member

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    I went Kind Of Blue, but they all are worthy. That's some incredible music.
     
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  4. el greco

    el greco Member

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    If there are other albums from this era that you believe should get mentioned, please express your feelings freely and let us know.
    I'm always open to learning new things when it comes to music, and I am no expert in Jazz. I just love all this great music that came out of this golden time in music. :)
     
  5. Badtone

    Badtone Supporting Member

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    Musically those are all great in their own rights, but I give the nod to Dave Brubeck and Time Out; it reached no. 2 in the pop charts and put jazz on the map, so to speak, opening up the genre to a wider audience. An important work in annals of Jazz, IMHO.
     
  6. WordMan

    WordMan Member

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    Kind of Blue. Easy.
     
  7. Kennybeeinfl

    Kennybeeinfl Member

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    I agree. Big shift of gears and it was maybe the first Supergroup. Timeless record.
     
  8. freedom's door

    freedom's door Supporting Member

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    Kind Of Blue towers far above all the rest of those albums, not for quality of music, but for being groundbreaking.
    That album changed jazz the same way Bird and Diz changed jazz.
    MONUMENTAL
     
  9. Rod

    Rod Tone is Paramount Silver Supporting Member

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    Dave Brubecks Music had accessibility to non jazzers like myself and my parents that no other artist listed above had..in my opinion...
     
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  10. Duffy Pratt

    Duffy Pratt Member

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    Chega de Saudade by Joao Gilberto, which is basically the first Bossa Nova album, but overlooked.

    Also, not quite jazz, but John Fahey’s Blind Joe Death is also from that year, and a genre buster/creator in its own right.
     
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  11. BriSol

    BriSol Member

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    Hard to just choose one. Forced to, I whimsicaly chose Brubeck. The question is what introduced new forms to jazz, right? Well, I'd say Brubeck's Time Out emphasized odd time signatures, and upfront classical music influences, in a way that hadn't quite been done before in jazz. I'm not sure there was such thing as a jazz song in 9/8 before Time Out. It also sold super well right next to Kind of Blue. We all probably know and dig Kind of Blue and it is a seminal album, but it's so commonly the cliche answer to this question that it's worth focusing elsewhere.

    If we want to be even more pedantic, we can talk about someone who was around during this time who was pretty unique but doesn't get talked about much: Sun Ra. Sun Ra's discography starts in 56 and almost immediately gets..."weird" in some ways. Sun Ra was going "West African spiritualist mode" before Coltrane or Miles did, and he was doing "free jazz" before Ornette Coleman had a word for it.

    I'm pretty sure there's a relationship between Ornette Coleman's free jazz, later Coltrane, and the influence of Sun Ra and the players he fostered like John Gilmore. Arguably, Miles Davis himself was influenced by Sun Ra at some point in the 60's. And I tend to see Sun Ra somewhat as coming from Thelonious Monk's quirky sensibility. The album Angels and Demons at Play might be a good reference for this period.

    The fact that Sun Ra simply existed at all makes me smirk in a good way, much like the fact that Frank Zappa existed.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  12. Jahn

    Jahn Listens to Johnny Marr, plays like John Denver Supporting Member

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    Kind of Blue ensured that Jazz would continue to remain important for as long as anyone cares about music.

    My emotional fave is giant steps, and the one I can listen to any time for fun is Time Out. But Kind of Blue took Jazz as a Genre and said “you know what? Some day this music of ours will be elevated out of the clubs and be revered in the concert halls and deservedly so, right alongside the Mozarts and the Puccinis.”
     
  13. Bluesful

    Bluesful Supporting Member

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    Hard to go past Kind of Blue.

    Time Out though is surely influential.
     
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  14. awp

    awp Member

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    I own everything on this list except for the Ellington. All are great in their own way but Kind of Blue is magical beyond comparison. It is probably my favourite recording of all time. I think that recording still resonates today.
     
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  15. HammyD

    HammyD Member

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    Thought the gang might like this in case you have not seen it.

     
  16. Help!I'maRock!

    Help!I'maRock! Member

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    Most important is "The Shape of Jazz to Come". But most influential is definitely "Kind of Blue".
     
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  17. GGinMP

    GGinMP Supporting Member

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    I agree that 1959 saw big changes in jazz, but I far prefer ‘54 - ‘58.
     
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  18. BobbyS

    BobbyS Member

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    Time Out.

    Technically, Kind of Blue was only composed of one type of jazz tune: modal. Time Out experimented with changing time signatures and forms.
     
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  19. Gotham City Blues

    Gotham City Blues Member

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    Miles was already experimenting with modes on Cannonball Adderlely’s Somethin’ Else in 1958, and on his own Ascenseur pour l'échafaud in ‘57. Therefore, I’ll go with Ornette Coleman for groundbreaking.
     
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  20. BriSol

    BriSol Member

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    For reference on why I consider Sun Ra a foreshadowing of things to come, this track was recorded in 1960.



    Neo-Africanism in full force here. And genre conventions out the window.
     
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