1966 Fender Stratocaster

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by clothwiring, May 24, 2006.

  1. clothwiring

    clothwiring Supporting Member

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    I am not the proud owner of a 1966 Fender Stratocaster. The thing is in good shape and included the majority (if not all) of the case candy. Frets 1-4 are questionable, but I think I can make it play fine with some adjusting, obviously won't be replacing anything on it.

    I also landed a Premier Reverb and a bunch of old catalogs/pricelists/and other stuff in the same sale. I'm going to sell the Premier and some of the other stuff.

    Never-the-less I am stoked about my land on the 1966 Stratocaster! :)

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Don L

    Don L Member

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    Congrats! She's a beaut! I had one like that back in the mid '90s. Great guitars!
     
  3. zappafrank

    zappafrank Member

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    would'nt mind emailed pics of the Premier, and a possible asking price

    I have an early 64 strat, refin Sonic Blue and repro guard, refret and 5-way, otherwise all original---I know how you feel! ---mine is the fave of the litter!

    CONGRATULATIONS!!

    ac
     
  4. clothwiring

    clothwiring Supporting Member

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    I took 3 hours talking about guitars and explained everything to him so that he was comfortable selling it to me. I took it apart to check it out for my own comfort and explained everything as I went along. He had sentimental value in the guitar, he was the original owner. He was impressed with my love, care and knowledge of guitars and felt that if anyone deserved the guitar it was me. We agreed on a price and it came home. He paid $339 for it...the price tag is in the case! :)
     
  5. mad dog

    mad dog Silver Supporting Member

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    My buddy down the street has a '66 much like yours. Really sweet guitar. His sister gave it to him new for his 16th birthday. What a family! I bring over my beat '61 strat, and we sit around, feeling way luckier than we deserve to be.
     
  6. George Johnson

    George Johnson Member

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  7. clothwiring

    clothwiring Supporting Member

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  8. HHB

    HHB Member

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    so very cool! congrats I'm green w/ envy, one day somehow!
     
  9. Dana Olsen

    Dana Olsen Gold Supporting Member

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    Man, that's wonderful! Congrats!

    Dana O
     
  10. sshan25

    sshan25 Supporting Member

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    I found the comment about leaving the "questionable" frets interesting. Is refretting a vintage guitar all that damaging to the value nowadays? As an analogy, if I bought a '66 Shelby Mustang, leaving the original tires on it would only help the value if they were as new. If they were worn, I wouldn't want to be driving around on them and I feel the same way about playing a guitar that didn't play as well as possible. I don't like 7.5 in. radius fretboards so I wouldn't be buying a stock 60's era Fender anyway, as cool as they are. I guess that's why I haven't gotten into the vintage gear thing. Guitars that were once considered "tools", albeit good ones, are now too valuable to alter in any way even if it improves the instrument. I like to tweak things too much to leave anything totally stock. This is not a criticism, it just piqued my curiosity. I wish you many years of enjoyment from your new Strat.
     
  11. clothwiring

    clothwiring Supporting Member

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    The plan is to sit on the guitar for a few years and sell it and have a nice down payment on a house. :) I won't modify it knowing that. I have enough other great sounding Strats that I'm okay with leaving the original frets on. I honestly haven't had any time with the guitar at home. The neck needs cleaning and I'll put new strings on it and set it up.
     
  12. Troubleman

    Troubleman Silver Supporting Member

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    If it's an investment, sure - leave the frets alone. If you bought the thing to play, if a refret is what it needs, get a refret done by a pro. I've a 1961 Strat that is absolutely killer. I play the thing. Guitars that great should be played. Enzo Ferrari didn't build his 12-cylinder long-nosed coupes to sit on linoleum floors in temperature-controlled environments, being rubbed with diapers for their entire lives. He built them to be driven, and hard. So true with vintage Strats. If the thing sounds like it should, it should be played. If it's one of those cold-sounding ones (somehow a lot of the absolutely clean and almost mint ones seem to be cold and lifeless), by all means - personal museum piece. Otherwise, take her out for spin.

    Of course, all that being said - my opinion and $3.50'll get you a triple venti mocha at Starbucks.....:D

    jb
     
  13. clothwiring

    clothwiring Supporting Member

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    It plays okay now, just some of the frets have some diviots in 'em. It's an investment/studio geetar. It might go to practice a few times...but in the end, I don't want to hurt the value so I will not be refretting it. It does sound good I plugged it in the night I went through it, played it through my 1965 Princeton Reverb and it sounded great! Really nice warm low end and a chimey bell tone. :)
     
  14. Troubleman

    Troubleman Silver Supporting Member

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    Given that, and the fact that for your intent and purpose it's an investment guitar and not a lifetime busom-buddy, see if a crowning and leveling will address the fret issues. Go that far and no further.

    jb
     
  15. clothwiring

    clothwiring Supporting Member

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    Here's a picture of the worst fret wear:

    [​IMG]
     
  16. clothwiring

    clothwiring Supporting Member

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    Actually I'm thinking of just throwing a neck on it and play it some. Then when I go to sell it I can put the original neck back on. Might be a fun way to go with it and not feel bad about hurting the neck. I have my '65 Relic neck that'd probably go good on it. :)
     
  17. Troubleman

    Troubleman Silver Supporting Member

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    From the angle of the photo I'd say there won't be much fret left if the wear is leveled. Probably best to live with it, considering your plans for the instrument. That said, to strick anal-retentive collectors a refret might be important. If you're selling to a player, probably not as much. Either way you'll have no problem selling it for plenty-o-bucks

    jb
     
  18. John Phillips

    John Phillips Member

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    Have it fret dressed. It won't cost much, and if you do the absolute minimum possible job (no lower than the bottom of the deepest groove) it can't possibly play any worse than it does now - and quite probably a lot better. Fret wear is usually deceptive in that it always looks worse before the job than afterwards - sometimes the frets even look taller once the grooves have gone, even though that obviously can't be true. And if it still doesn't play great afterwards you've kept the investment value intact anyway - maybe improved it, if the frets no longer look badly grooved.

    FWIW, a friend of mine has an almost identical 100% original '66 with frets so low it's almost fretless - he likes it like that, and it sounds really amazing. It has great sustain and a very bright, ringing tone... totally unlike my borrowed '64.
     
  19. GM1

    GM1 Member

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    I have been doing the same thing. Bought a 63 L-series Strat form Loyd at Voltage Guitars in Hollywood in 1987. Paided $2,600. Its in almost perfect condition. I have been holding on to it and a mint 64 Vibroverb so that someday I can sell for a downpayment on a house. I have plenty of cool Strats to play, this one was an investment. Loyd assured me it would go up in value even though at that time 50s Strats were the choice. I was in Voltage about a month ago and they said its probably worth close to 20K.
     
  20. clothwiring

    clothwiring Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the input John. I'm going up to a friend who's dealt with vintage guitars for years and get his input on it. Plus he'll try buying it from me...but I'll just say nope. :)
     

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