2 Point Synchronized Tremolo Question

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by binge, Feb 13, 2012.

  1. binge

    binge Member

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    I have a 2011 Fender Strat and I like it very much. I do not use the trem a lot and have decided to make the guitar into a hardtail Strat.

    I was wondering how far down I should tighten the claw in the rear cavity? Is it OK to tighten it down so it's flush or would this put too much tension on the screws? Perhaps only 3 springs and the claw tightened would be sufficient? Should I add in the two extra springs?

    Can you guys post pictures of how far you have your claws tightened please?

    I play in standard tuning and use 9-42 gauge strings.
     
  2. twofootskunk

    twofootskunk Member

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    I had my strat bridge "decked" with just the 3 stock springs and the claw screwed in far enough that a full step bend on 2 strings didn't pull it up.

    That said, if I did it again I'd probably block the bridge instead of just tightening the claw. Without blocking it the string break angle over the saddles is pretty severe. In fact I have better tuning stability with my bridge floating than I did with it decked.
     
  3. fumbler

    fumbler Member

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    If you have the extra springs, you should go ahead and put them in but it's not the end of the world if you don't have 'em. With only 3 springs you'll have to screw in the claw pretty far. But this won't cause any problems. The screws can definitely take it (I assume you're asking about the 2 wood screws that hold the claw.) However, if you're playing heavy gauge strings you may run out of travel and you'll HAVE to install more springs.

    Do this:
    Tune the guitar and keep retuning as you go during this process. Tighten the claw down until the bridge plate sits down on the guitars top. Then start bending strings and listening for the other strings to go flat. Keep tightening the claw down until it holds tuning at your most extreme bend (within reason). No need to tighten it further than that.

    For reference, I've had my claw screwed in until there's less than 1/4" of travel left. But that will depend on your string gauge, number and stiffness of springs, saddle height (higher saddles give the string more torque to rock the bridge forward), etc.

    I'm not sure I understand what you're saying. How could blocking it affect the break angle? Maybe you're blocking it so that the plate is NOT decked? Why?

    Just decking the trem by screwing in the claw (as above) or blocking it "normally" makes the bridge behave just like a real hardtail.
     
  4. twofootskunk

    twofootskunk Member

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    When my strat was decked, the saddles had to be at a pretty steep angle to keep my action where I wanted. I was just suggesting that blocking the bridge at the regular floating position would put the saddles at a flatter angle (closer to where they are when floating).
     
  5. fumbler

    fumbler Member

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    Fair enough. In that situation you could also try shimming the neck pocket.
     
  6. binge

    binge Member

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    Thanks for the help, guys.
     

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