27" scale length made from a 30" scale bass fretboard?

T.C. Tyler

Member
Messages
46
Is it possible to make a 27" scale guitar from a 30" scale bass fretboard by just cutting off at the first fret making where the first was the nut placement for a 27" scale guitar?

Any help, info or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
T.C.
 

Pfeister

Member
Messages
1,586
Interesting idea, but, no, it won't match up. 1st-2nd on a 27" scale is 1.515", but 2nd-3rd on a 30" is 1.589".

It doesn't sound like much, but it is. Every fret would be off.
 

memiller

Member
Messages
861
It would end up being a 28.485" scale length at the first fret. Put the nut at the second fret and you wind up with a 26.727" scale. If you haven't drilled the bridge holes either will work, obviously. Otherwise... SOL.
 

T.C. Tyler

Member
Messages
46
Put the nut at the second fret and you wind up with a 26.727" scale. If you haven't drilled the bridge holes either will work, obviously. Otherwise... SOL.
Alright, I have not started the project yet. Now if I put the nut at the second fret and have a scale length of 26.727, would all the frets play in tune with the rest of the band?
 

Pfeister

Member
Messages
1,586
It would end up being a 28.485" scale length at the first fret. Put the nut at the second fret and you wind up with a 26.727" scale. If you haven't drilled the bridge holes either will work, obviously. Otherwise... SOL.
My mind jumped right to the distance between frets, but you're right. That would work.
 

verhoevenc

Member
Messages
225
The theory is sound. I plan to make the fretboards for my new "jaguar" style guitar (historically a 24" scale) by taking a 25.5" scale and chopping off the first fret. Leaves me with right about 24 1/16" scale... I'm happy with that :) Designed accordingly. That said... knowing guitar factories and their histories I'd be curious now to get my hands on some old jaguars and see if they were actually 24" or if they were 25.5" scales without the first fret... cause that sounds like something they'd have done!
Chris
 

Dave Klausner

Member
Messages
1,195
As has been said, as long as the overall scale length is correct, it will be fine.

When Bill Wyman contacted Ned Steinberger about doing a short scale bass, Ned initially scratched his head, thinking the cost of a new mold would be prohibitive, but he obviously wanted to try to accommodate the bass player from the biggest rock band in the world. Finally, it occurred to him to just bandsaw off the end of the neck and put a new double ball nut on. One fewer fret, but instant short scale.
 

nagarjuna

Member
Messages
104
The theory is sound. I plan to make the fretboards for my new "jaguar" style guitar (historically a 24" scale) by taking a 25.5" scale and chopping off the first fret. Leaves me with right about 24 1/16" scale... I'm happy with that :) Designed accordingly. That said... knowing guitar factories and their histories I'd be curious now to get my hands on some old jaguars and see if they were actually 24" or if they were 25.5" scales without the first fret... cause that sounds like something they'd have done!
Chris
Chris, very interested in this guitar you are building. Will you post it when it's done? :cool:
 

memiller

Member
Messages
861
Alright, I have not started the project yet. Now if I put the nut at the second fret and have a scale length of 26.727, would all the frets play in tune with the rest of the band?
As long as the bridge is in the correct place for that scale length, yes.

Another example is Tal Farlow, who had his guitars shortened in scale. Chop the head off and graft it on at the second fret. Easy, eh?
 

Jack Daniels

Member
Messages
1,981
Hey Chris,

I'm no expert on vintage fender necks, but I believe you are correct. The bass necks (34"?), Short scale bass (28"?) Strat/tele 25.5, Jag 24 and Mustang 22" (22.5?) scale necks all appeared to be able to be cut on the same gang saw. By getting it started at the right blade location, it would determine the scale. I did read that in a Fender book somewhere, and have done some comparisons which seem to prove that theory. Most recently I had a 68 mustang neck here and lined it up with a Strat neck from the same era. Two frets off, but it appeared to line up perfectly the rest of the way up. Tried this in the past on a bass with similar results.

I recently sold the Stang neck, so I can't take pictures.

Joe
 

Brett Faust

Member
Messages
850
No need to move the bridge,just choose a fret position and place the nut.
Think of the new nut location like a capo,the heel of the neck stays exactly the same except the taper may change a little..
 




Trending Topics

Top