3 Billion Fewer Wild Birds Than 1970

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by chrisr777, Sep 19, 2019.

  1. Tone_Terrific

    Tone_Terrific Supporting Member

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    Well, the birds are the ones with West Nile disease so good riddance, right?
     
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  2. Juneaumike

    Juneaumike Member

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    I don't think this is playing out like the OP had hoped. :D
     
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  3. Nevets

    Nevets Supporting Member

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    Bad kitty! That's a very bad kitty!!!!
     
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  4. RhytmEarl

    RhytmEarl Member

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    I've seen mosquitos the size of birds, so if that's what you mean, ya, birds carry West Nile. :D
     
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  5. Tone_Terrific

    Tone_Terrific Supporting Member

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    Don't blame the mosquitoes, it's a bird disease, just passed around by mosquitoes as carriers.
     
  6. Bob T.

    Bob T. Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  7. JWDubois

    JWDubois Member

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    Crows, hummingbirds (I saw five at once on my kids deck last week), and vultures all doing well around here too. Also I still see all the usual songbirds, and since we have a lot of lakes around, heron and osprey.
     
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  8. bluwoodsman

    bluwoodsman Member

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    A
    Not sure I understand this reply.

    This isn't so much a study as a review of all the many different ongoing survey information related to birds, some of which are designed to cover all types of habitats. The Breeding Bird Survey alone has many thousands of survey routes--that traverse 25 miles or so and stop every 1/2 mile to take note of bird presence.

    Cats are widely distributed--including in what most on this site would consider very wild places. How do we know? Surveys, again. No they generally aren't surveying cats--usually some type of furbearer or game species--but those surveys often take note of cats or cat sign as well. Cats are found deep into remote territory.

    And the fact that some species are doing well isn't saying anything--the announcement isnt saying that no species are doing well, the message is the number that are doing poorly.

    If you take note of those doing well they tend to be habitat generalists or those who are favored by human habitat manipulation. Those with narrow habitat requirements --or are found in places routinely trashed by humans --ain't doing well in most cases.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2019
  9. TimmyPage

    TimmyPage Member

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    Even scarier than that is the mass drop-off in insect populations. (Largely the same causes: loss of habitat, chemical repellants. Basically, human interference). More than 40% of insect populations are in decline, and about a third of insects are endangered.

    At first you might think "sweet, bugs are gross!" but oh boy do I have some bad news for you about the food chain. The loss of bees alone (of which 40% of a 'normal' population have already died off) would cause catastrophic ecological collapse. (No pollination > no flowering > small insects that eat flowers die >things that eat flowers and small insects die, everything else eventually starves)

    Humans are doing tremendous damage to the planet in the hopes of increasing our profit margins.
     
  10. firebird1999us

    firebird1999us Member

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    There used to be a bird watching forum called Birds and Moons that sadly went away too:cry:
     
  11. FLYING V 83

    FLYING V 83 Gibson Geezer Silver Supporting Member

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    Having a hard time picturing millions of people around the world with pencils & clipboards counting birds & bugs.

    Milk & eggs used to be deadly too.
     
  12. StealthHunter

    StealthHunter Member

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    Honeybees have only existed in North America for around 400 years. I find it hard to believe there'd be a catastrophic ecological collapse.
     
  13. TimmyPage

    TimmyPage Member

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    Various species of honey bees have existed in North America for millions of years. There is evidence that the ancient North American civilisations like the Aztecs cultivated bees and used honey.

    The European honey bee was introduced in the 1600s. It was far easier to cultivate and had higher honey yields from a smaller number of hives.

    There are other species which have acted as pollinators in decline as well, moths and butterflies included.
     
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  14. hellbender

    hellbender Member

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    The European honey bee was imported by man to the west to support industrialized farming. Pollinating species of flies, bees and others have existed here for eons, of which there are hundreds.
     
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  15. 84superchamp

    84superchamp Silver Supporting Member

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    Yes, it broke my heart to see my cat with a female cardinal after watching the pair at my feeder for years. The feeder is 8ft off the ground but guess she got careless.
     
  16. chrisr777

    chrisr777 Member

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    Going pretty good actually. Only a few people like you with their heads in the ground.
     
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  17. Dr. Tweedbucket

    Dr. Tweedbucket Deluxe model available !!!11

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    I love birds. I'm out where it's all woods in the back and they are all over the place. I sleep with the windows open to hear them in the morning. :love:

    The other night it was an owl fest. One owl started hooting and then another showed up and they were hooting back and forth. They have their own language, :red but I KNOW they were hooting about me, I just KNOW it! :waiting
     
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  18. Juneaumike

    Juneaumike Member

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    Heads in the ground? What does that mean?
     
  19. chrisr777

    chrisr777 Member

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    It's a bird reference.

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Juneaumike

    Juneaumike Member

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    I know that it's a bird reference, but I don't understand the context. What exactly are you trying to say with this bird reference?
     

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