3D printing?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by skydog, Jan 17, 2015.

  1. skydog

    skydog Supporting Member

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    Can someone explain this process in layman's terms?
     
  2. pbmw

    pbmw Member

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    The most common use a UV curable plastic, scanned by a UV lazer. Part rises from the bottom and is constructed in layers
     
  3. Ampedusa

    Ampedusa Member

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    Very laymen: You have a printer, most likely hooked up to a computer through a usb cable. You can download free files at places like thingiverse.com then a program called a slicer makes it ready for the printer. Upload file to printer. Printer has some sort (usually) of plastic filament that gets fed into a extruder that moves around and places a small layer of plastic on a glass plate (usually) according to what the file says. It keeps laying layer on top of layer until finished. A layer might be one dot. Here is something I printed out on a sub $500 printer then painted.

    [​IMG]

    and another

    [​IMG]

    It's a fun hobby. You can design your own 3d files if you want.
     
  4. wahfreak

    wahfreak Silver Supporting Member

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    You create a 3D part in a drawing package like Solidworks. Once the drawing is done, you export the drawing to the 3D printer. The printer will then use a polymer to begin "stacking" layers of the drawing. I'm not exactly sure but I thought it creates layers about 0.010" thick. It starts at the base and as the program continues the base will drop about 0.010" and build upon the previous layer.

     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2015
  5. JB

    JB Member

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    Higher quality printers can print in finer levels of detail. The consumer level 3D printers (less expensive ones) will have visible strands showing each layer that was printed. 3D printers also print out a flimsy supporting cast on the outside of object and inside hollow areas to support the object while being printed. Different printers will use different types of plastics and different methods of creating casts.
     
  6. Trout

    Trout Member

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    With I could get the file for this one cheap
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Macleod

    Macleod Member

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    Haha! Hey, those are mine!
    Doing some prototypes for a P-90 for humbucker route. I made my first one of those way back in 1998 by tearing up a dog-eared P-90 cover and humbucker mounting ring, and joining them together,. It was crude, but it worked. Later, I used pickguard material and a similar process.
    People are starting to ask for them more, but they're such a PITA to make, that I'm finally looking at injection molding the parts, then shaving them to fit particular guitars, etc.

    My issue with every P-90 for humbucker route is that a P-90 coil doesn't fit under a humbucker-sized cover. Coil geometry must be changed, and that doesn't fit well with me. This way, you can use a real P-90... clip the corners off, and they fit in most routes just fine.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2015
  8. 2leod

    2leod Re-Member Gold Supporting Member

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    The other approach to 3D printing gaining traction is a spool of plastic wire (like PVC) fed into a hot nozzle (think glue gun) and deposited layer by layer until the model is built up. The models are dimensionally more stable than the liquid bath or powder tank models, if the ones selling these machines are to be believed.

    :)
     
  9. Macleod

    Macleod Member

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    The first 3D printed prototype I got made was done with an old generation Makerbot. it was pretty sturdy, but the print resolution left a very bumpy, surface, like 80 grit sandpaper.
    The one pictured above was done with a Formlabs printer.

    FYI, Home Depot now carries a $1000 Dremel 3D printer.
    Heavily considering one, so I can do my testing at will, and get preliminary versions into people's hands.
     
  10. 2leod

    2leod Re-Member Gold Supporting Member

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  11. Ampedusa

    Ampedusa Member

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    If you are thinking about getting a 3d printer, make sure you think about the filament system. A lot of machines will take bulk filament but some have a proprietary filament system, which I think the Dremel uses. With the Dremel http://www.homedepot.com/p/Dremel-1-1-lbs-Purple-PLA-Filament-DF05-01/205477336?keyword=DF05-01&AID=10368321&PID=1796839&SID=70223110&cm_mmc=CJ-_-1796839-_-10368321&cj=true for example, you get 1.1 pounds of filament for $29.99 but you can get the same stuff in bulk off of ebay for much cheaper, http://www.ebay.com/itm/3D-Printer-Filament-1-75mm-3mm-ABS-PLA-1kg-2-2lb-RepRap-MarkerBot-30-Colors-/141131803145?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&var=&hash=item20dc1c6a09 ex: 2.2 pounds for around $20 with free shipping.
     
  12. rdwilson

    rdwilson Member

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  13. Minte

    Minte *except for a few minor scratches* Gold Supporting Member

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    There is an in-between process called urethane casting. You have a master already, so from that you pour a silicone mold. We do that at our shop as a stop gap waiting for injection molds to be built. We also injection mold inhouse. We use our 3D printer to make masters.
     
  14. fredgarvin

    fredgarvin Member

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  15. Macleod

    Macleod Member

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    I tried the Urethane casting a couple years ago, I could never get it to work well. I know how to make silicone molds, did it plenty of time before, but I always came up with bubbles during these attempts, and getting the material I was casting with to dry hard and no-tacky was difficult.
    I'm friends with Kent Armstrong, he uses that method a lot. I may have to consult with him at length about the process.
    There's a material called Smooth-On that you might want to look into. Makes some pretty sturdy stuff, some of it even suitable for stamping!
     
  16. nosinger

    nosinger Member

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    Google Josh Harker if you want to see some cool stuff done with 3D printing. Josh is a pioneer in 3D art and does some really amazing work.
     
  17. mikebat

    mikebat Member

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    When any TGP'er needs one, contact me.

    I service and sell these from multiple brands.

    The most intriguing is the XYZ AIO, which has an integrated 3d scanner..... so reverse engineering is a snap!

    I can't personally sell into the States, but I can give you the low down, and send you some references.
     
  18. cj_wattage

    cj_wattage Vendor

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    I have the XYZ Da Vinci 1.0. I'm mostly happy with it, although I find the closed-source software and firmware to be somewhat limiting. I've got a filament cartridge reprogrammer, so I can get the cheaper filament, but I wish the firmware offered a more robust calibration procedure. Either the X or Y axis is a little bit off, so doing perfect circles is impossible. Any tips on how to adjust? (I'm aware that alternative firmware is available, but I'd like to try to stay with the original, if possible).

    Thanks!
     
  19. mikebat

    mikebat Member

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    There is new firmware in beta, and it is great. Results on par with printers 10x the price, if not in the $15k pricepoint. Question for you, with filament in the $30 range, why use cheaper? Cartridges for other printers are up to 10x the cost, when it is that cheap...I would just stick to official filament. Just my opinion, and I repeat, I cannot make a dime from you. As for calibration, yes, it is not the ultimate in flexibility, but with some practice,you can get pretty good. I think it is importAnt to manage spectators, it is a sub. $500 printer. Two years ago, and entry level printer was $13k, and had $300 cartridges. We have come a long way. And....just as an aside, I have heard of a few folks hacking the firmware, using customer g-slicers, etc.... There are people pushing the envelope out there..
     
  20. Ampedusa

    Ampedusa Member

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    I have the same setup. I just use a level and ignore the internal calibration. Works for me so far. I have the reprogammer too because the XYZ filament costs $28 for 600 grams and no free shipping, the regular stuff is $20 for 1000 grams with free shipping and more colors. Be warned that is you do update the firmware you can brick your reprogrammer. Google for more info.
     

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