50-60hz sine wave speaker break-in: How Loud?

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334
I've read about this, but just out of curiosity, how loud should this sound?

Barely audible when your in the room?
Audible in the next room?
Audible on the next floor?
Piss off your neighbors?

Lets say a 200w speaker.
 
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Blue Strat

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Definitely audible outside the room. Beyond that, there's no way to quantify "how loud" without using a sound pressure meter.
 

J M Fahey

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I use 10/12V for 8 ohms speakers.
In my 100 y.o. 19 room house, barely audible in the next room and not at all 2 rooms away.
Now in a modern thin walled appartment, it may be "seem" louder, specially at night, but not annoying to neighbours in any way.
Let me add that I always sit the speaker magnet on a folded towel; I guess that in a large table or a wooden floor, sound may be "amplified" similar to what a piano soundboard does.
 
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Interesting. I figured if I did this, I would loop a 50hz sine wave in garageband through my receiver, so its hard to tell how much I would be pushing the speaker. I'm sure my guitar speaker can handle more than my stereo speakers, but thats a lot of bass.
 

Fulldrive-1

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Only internet guitar players worry about breaking in speakers.

The playas take that new cab out and crank it up . . . on the job training for speaker cones!
 

scott1568

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To the above poster, just a few hours makes a big difference.

To the OP, you should her some hum, but don't push them too hard. Just look for the cone to be pulsing in and out, that 's the main thing. It will loosen up the cone, surround and spider.
 

tubetonez

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Only internet guitar players worry about breaking in speakers.

The playas take that new cab out and crank it up . . . on the job training for speaker cones!
I've done both, and the sine wave method works a treat when done correctly.

To the OP, at 50hz - 60hz you're not going to hear much, it will be more of a hum/vibration. With a raw driver sitting face up on a padded surface, it's difficult to hear at all - certainly not from the next room. If you're breaking in a pair of drivers or multiples, you can wire them out of phase to reduce output further. If I do drivers in a cab, I'll lay the cab face down on carpet.

See my recent post here https://www.thegearpage.net/board/index.php?posts/16035199&postcount=6
 
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Only internet guitar players worry about breaking in speakers.

The playas take that new cab out and crank it up . . . on the job training for speaker cones!
Thanks, but as the original post says, its mainly out of curiosity that I was asking. The speaker I had in mind when hypothetically asking this question is an EVM12L. Its fully broken in, but not one of the early originals with the silver back. The ones with the silver back seem to have much silkier, smoother treble. I read a post recently and the person was saying running a low frequency tone through a broken in speaker actually made a big improvement. I was just wondering if my EVM, which I love, would get even better.

To the above poster, just a few hours makes a big difference.

To the OP, you should her some hum, but don't push them too hard. Just look for the cone to be pulsing in and out, that 's the main thing. It will loosen up the cone, surround and spider.
I've done both, and the sine wave method works a treat when done correctly.

To the OP, at 50hz - 60hz you're not going to hear much, it will be more of a hum/vibration. With a raw driver sitting face up on a padded surface, it's difficult to hear at all - certainly not from the next room. If you're breaking in a pair of drivers or multiples, you can wire them out of phase to reduce output further. If I do drivers in a cab, I'll lay the cab face down on carpet.

See my recent post here https://www.thegearpage.net/board/index.php?posts/16035199&postcount=6
Thanks guys, thats helpful!

Those low freuqencies seem to sound a lot quieter than they are. Maybe its because humans are meant to hear midrange and it would be really loud to an elephant.

Anyway, I tried the low frequency briefly and while it sounded quiet, the cone was really moving a whole lot when it touched it gently. It definitely would have tossed a pick out of it in a few bounces.
 




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