'60-'70 12 inch possible Celection blackback

catastrofos

Member
Messages
12
Hi all,
I have a 'vintage' Laney 30w with a speaker with no sticker on it.

The code stamped is : T1385 8 Ohm , MI (or ML) 21.

Searching this code T1385 im coming to G12L but this magnet is not a L one, rather M. Looks exactly like Greenback ..

Anyone an idea what this is ?

Greetings



 

shermanator

Member
Messages
285
Doesn't look exactly greenbackish to me. Have another peek; magnet and dustcap size and shape are different.
 

catastrofos

Member
Messages
12
Hello and thanks for answers,

I now realise that Celestion had different sizes / shapes for the chassis.
That was the main cause of my suspicion - if I have a G12S or G12M.

Considering that amp it self is 30w then this speaker should be around 50-50-60W I suppose?

Cheers
 

Bygone Tones

Member
Messages
69
It is a G12L. Very small magnet speaker. In the late 70's it would likely have been rated as a 15 watt speaker. ML = Dec 1978.

They sound OK but have very little bass or "boom" due to that puny magnet. They were mostly used in low watt practise amp combos, PA cabs, and those solid state Marshall combos in the late 70's. Not something you would really want to use in a 4x12 with a 50w or 100w head, but great for at home / bedroom practise.

Magnet Sizes
The ceramic magnets used on Celestion greenback speakers came in four main sizes. The larger magnets have a higher power handling because they can absorb more heat.
  • G12H – Heavy magnet (50oz) – rated 30w or 25w depending when made*
  • G12M – Medium magnet (35oz) – 5 watts less power handling than G12H
  • G12S – Small magnet (28oz) – 5 watts less power handling than G12M
  • G12L – Light magnet (20oz) – 5 watts less power handling than G12S
Generally speaking, the bigger the magnet, the louder and bigger the sound will be. The G12H and G12M speakers are the most popular Celestion greenback models.

*Power handling increased by 5 watts around late 1967 due to a change in the voice coil design.
 
Messages
5,891
It is a G12L. Very small magnet speaker. In the late 70's it would likely have been rated as a 15 watt speaker. ML = Dec 1978.

They sound OK but have very little bass or "boom" due to that puny magnet. They were mostly used in low watt practise amp combos, PA cabs, and those solid state Marshall combos in the late 70's. Not something you would really want to use in a 4x12 with a 50w or 100w head, but great for at home / bedroom practise.

Magnet Sizes
The ceramic magnets used on Celestion greenback speakers came in four main sizes. The larger magnets have a higher power handling because they can absorb more heat.
  • G12H – Heavy magnet (50oz) – rated 30w or 25w depending when made*
  • G12M – Medium magnet (35oz) – 5 watts less power handling than G12H
  • G12S – Small magnet (28oz) – 5 watts less power handling than G12M
  • G12L – Light magnet (20oz) – 5 watts less power handling than G12S
Generally speaking, the bigger the magnet, the louder and bigger the sound will be. The G12H and G12M speakers are the most popular Celestion greenback models.

*Power handling increased by 5 watts around late 1967 due to a change in the voice coil design.
Great of you to chime in on the matter.
 

catastrofos

Member
Messages
12
Thanx all for reply's,

Bygone Tones gave spot on explanation, thanks extra for that !

I was a bit confused between L as 'Light" and S as a "Small",
so now is more than clear to me.

Amp is played in a std European apartment so lot of concrete walls and behind them - neighbours.
Low volume with a good sound is what I need and this amp just delivers that.
40 years old thing ...

Bass ("boom") coming out is actually quite good (again played on low volume),
need some time to improve the general sound as I notice that the covered area on the back makes a big difference in overall sound (muff vs clear).
To do ..

Greetings
 




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