'68 Fender Deluxe Reverb issue

Discussion in 'Amps/Cabs Tech Corner: Amplifier, Cab & Speakers' started by co-intelpro, Jan 12, 2008.


  1. co-intelpro

    co-intelpro Member

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    I was using my old Fender DR for a recording session a while back. The original speaker was in there.

    I kicked in my fuzz pedal, right then the volume went down to about half. A smell of plastic burning came on (but no smoke), so I shut it off right away. I let it cool down, then turned it on again...nothing, no sound.

    I brought it to a tech, who is always too busy, and left it there. After a while I contacted him and he said that he turned it on, and it worked fine. However, my speaker was shot and needed replacing.

    Do you think the smell was the speaker frying? Or, do you think that smell was some other component frying? I replaced the speaker with a greenback, and it is certainly darker sounding than it was before, so could it have been something else?
     
  2. Blue Strat

    Blue Strat Member

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    It could have been the speaker. You're going to have to trust your tech (or try another tech) as no one else is likely to be able to do a better job checking out an amp over the internet.
     
  3. PRNDL

    PRNDL Member

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    It's unusual for a speaker to blow like that, so you might be correct in wondering what happened.

    Did you try the old speaker either in this or another less cool amp to see if it was bad?
    If it is bad, then it most likely had a short in the voice coil, which you can get replaced if you want to keep everything original.

    A greenback is definitely a darker speaker, which is great for Marshall amps. A Jensen P12 would be more appropriate.
     
  4. co-intelpro

    co-intelpro Member

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    Thanks for the info on the proper speaker replacement. Ya, the speaker was rubbing, but not blown. So, I'm wondering what I burned up in the amp to create the smell and the operation failure.

    The tech said he didn't even bother checking the inside because it just fired up and worked fine at the shop. Bogus thing to do, I think. But, this dude is the only "trustowrthy" guy in town, and is always way too busy with warranteed work.

    What I want to know is, can an overworked speaker produce a burning smell? Otherwise, I should take it to someone else.
     
  5. Blue Strat

    Blue Strat Member

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    If this hasn't been done lately, you should have the bias on the power tubes checked (this can give clues to a lot of things) and check the status of the filter caps. If they're original, they need to be replaced for sure.

    A complete checkout is in order.
     
  6. slider313

    slider313 Silver Supporting Member

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    You may have blown the fuse and that's what you smelled burning.
     

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