70s Epiphone Casino

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by tycobb73, May 18, 2015.

  1. tycobb73

    tycobb73 Supporting Member

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    Can you guys give me your opinion on this? Is it possible it was made in Kalamazoo? I live an hour north of there so I'm on the hunt for something from there. Plus I would like a hollowbody. But if these don't have good reviews I'll pass. I"m not expecting it to compete with $3000 guitar but how does it stack up with other used guitars in the same price range?

    http://grandrapids.craigslist.org/msg/5029234229.html
     
  2. drbob1

    drbob1 Silver Supporting Member

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    japanese made I'm pretty sure, and maybe modded, but that's a good price...
     
  3. SPROING!

    SPROING! Member

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    Kalamazoo production for Epiphone ended in the late 60s.
    Probably Japanese.

    Yeah, looking at the hardware, that's definitely 70s Japanese vintage.
     
  4. Zuhzuhzombie!!

    Zuhzuhzombie!! Member

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    Japanese made with Bolt On necks. They're okay instruments. If he'd take 300 for it you might have yourself a solid beater.
     
  5. swiveltung

    swiveltung Member

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    That appears to be a Japanese made one. Maybe an EA250 or something like that. Most are not that good, but some can be. I had one in walnut finish. When you look at it, if the action is real high..... I would pass on it. May not have enough room to correct that. However, if you are in for a project and can do neck shimming carving etc it may work out.
    They don't command the respect that their age might make you think it should. But it's for a reason.
    The sticker inside the upper F hole should say if it's a EA250, 255, 265 etc. Check them out on Ebay for sold prices maybe.
    Mine looked like a 335 type but was actually called a Casino. I think EA265? go figure. In the end, after a lot of work it just wasnt up to the sound of a previous lawsuit Ibanez (?) 335 type I had which in retrospect was great by comparison.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2015
  6. sa1126

    sa1126 Member

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    Definitely not a casino and probably not worth the asking price IMO...
     
  7. Whiskeyrebel

    Whiskeyrebel Member

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    I have that exact guitar but mine was labeled 5102TE. Matsumoku built. I think this is the same as the EA250 except maybe for the color of the pickup covers. I've seen pics of identical Aria and Univox guitars.

    The pickups are pretty sweet when you get them close enough to the strings to get a solid signal. The neck is narrow at the nut, sort of a shallow D shape with definite shoulders and a flattish back. In that nice shape with a case, I wouldn't say the price is totally crazy, but it could come down some.
     
  8. Zuhzuhzombie!!

    Zuhzuhzombie!! Member

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    This guy is giving the impression that it may have been built in Kalamazoo in the transition period.
     
  9. onemoretime

    onemoretime Member

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    Not worth that kind of money and a newer Casino will have better playability and tone.
     
  10. mc5nrg

    mc5nrg Supporting Member

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  11. Elduderino73

    Elduderino73 Member

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    A semi-hollow with a bolt-on neck? What's the point?
     
  12. Whiskeyrebel

    Whiskeyrebel Member

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    The point is that it sounds a lot different from a solidbody. It's actually fully hollow with a floating bridge. Sort of like a 175 thinline with a 335 silhouette. The mouse-ear body shape makes the upper frets easy to use even with the clunky bolt-on neck block.

    In this one case the bolt neck is beneficial. Some of these have had the neck block shift in angle or the top slightly flatten over the past 45-odd years. Thanks to the screws, you can use shims to fine-tune the neck angle to compensate and it's really not that hard to do. A set neck with high action would simply be uckfayed.
     
  13. elmoscafeo

    elmoscafeo Member

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  14. tartanphantom

    tartanphantom Member

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    And his "impression" is completely wrong. The earliest ones (very late 1969 to 1971, designated as model 5102-T) do indeed have a blue label that reads "Kalamazoo, Michigan", which is where the company was located at the time. However, nowhere on the guitar does it indicate "MADE in Kalamazoo, or MADE in USA. In fact, if he would bother to look at the chrome neck plate, he would see that it is very clearly stamped "MADE IN JAPAN"... and that's not just an indication for the neck plate itself. The model was re-designated EA-250 after 1971.

    All of them were made in Japan, all of them were made by Matsumoku.

    A similar situation occurred on some early Pre-Fender-era Gretsch models. The earlier ones have a label that reads "Fred Gretsch Co., Savannah, GA", but that's not where they were made.

    They are indeed fully hollow, but it does have a monster-sized sound post underneath the bridge-- approx. 1.5 x 2 inches in size. And yes, the bolt-on is an advantage on this guitar-- I was able to shim the neck on mine (a 5102-T) and make it into a rather sweet player. Without the ability to do this, it would be a wall-hanger.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2015
  15. tycobb73

    tycobb73 Supporting Member

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    thanks guys. and I need to clarify something. I'm probably 15 minutes away from the seller, but I"m 1 hour away from Kalamazoo and a homer. That is why the made in kalamazoo is so important to me. I want to have a mode, guitar or bass, that was made at the kalamazoo plant. I'll be passing on this one.
     
  16. SPROING!

    SPROING! Member

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    Can't blame you. The guitar is probably pretty junky. 1971 MIJ isn't the same as a 2015 MIJ.
     
  17. Whiskeyrebel

    Whiskeyrebel Member

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    Depends on what aspect of it you're focused on. Even though the pickups look like should have fallen apart by the way they are built, the original switch and pots and pickups on mine are all still going strong. The body has a design flaw that can lead to the deformation I mentioned but the neck itself is built very ruggedly. Three pieces of maple separated by veneer stringers. I've had it 15 years without touching the truss rod. The original tuners were cheesy though.
     

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