77 strat

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by LoganKade, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. LoganKade

    LoganKade Member

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    Just a question, really out of pure curiosity, but I have a 100% original '77 strat that I purchased a few years back, and I love it, but do you ever think the late 70's strats will ever be highly desired like some other vintage strats? I wonder this because as immaculate of condition as it's in, it's not necessarily the best playing strat I've ever picked up or anything. Idk, just a random thing on my mind, figured I'd start some conversation :)
     
  2. Ciroxin

    Ciroxin Member

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    Nobody can be sure about these things but you asked for opinion so... here is mine: I doubt that.
     
  3. GAD

    GAD Wubbalubbadubdub Silver Supporting Member

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    I find 70s strat lust funny, because in the 70s and 80s, we hated the damn things. Now we fall all over ourselves when we find one. I'm not making fun of you - I've found myself drooling more than once at a 70s natural with rosewood board. :)

    Of course, in the 70s and 80s, 50s and 60s strats didn't command the crazy prices they do today, AND, they were only 20-30 years old - not 50-60.

    Anyway, yes - I do believe that 70s strats will continue to go up in price, just like 70s Les Pauls seem to be. Since all the rich people buy up all the really old stuff, 70s models give us average Joes a chance to buy and play vintage for less coin. Are they as amazing as the 50s and 60s models? No, but some of those 70s guitars still sound and play damn fine.
     
  4. FXPedal.com

    FXPedal.com Member

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    3 bolt 70's Strats aren't very desirable but if it's in great shape and a popular or rare color it may be worth keeping as an investment. Certain rare colors, like Mocha, are generally not well liked.
     
  5. larimar

    larimar Member

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    I never imagined 70's Fender gear would reach they prices they are now so who knows!
     
  6. Texsunburst59

    Texsunburst59 Member

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    If it doesn't play that well and you don't really need to flip it,then just hold on to it. It will be worth something one day. It will never be a desired guitar but will have more value than most of the very expensive boutique guitars out there right now. I believe it will hold its own in the future. Just my opinion though. Most people wouldn't throw down any coin for my '79 Antigua ,but I'll never sell it whether it's worth a lot 20 yrs. from now or not.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. kinmike

    kinmike Supporting Member

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    The poor quality and playability of 70s Fenders and Gibsons is what launched the vintage guitar market. Players saw the downturn in quality and wanted the good stuff made in the 50s and 60s. Supply was limited and demand was high so the prices started going up.

    No offense meant but I think 77-79 was the absolute nadir for Fender. Fender guitars made at ANY other time are/were better.
     
  8. vibrasonic

    vibrasonic Member

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    I think Strats up to 74 are nice. I had an awesome 74 that i foolishly sold in 2003 because
    i wanted a different guitar. I got $1400 in trade. The next year they started selling for over double that. It was a great sounding and playing guitar, very light too.

    I really mis that one.
     
  9. CasinoK

    CasinoK Member

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    I agree with this to a point, certainly I've played many more P.O.S. boat anchor mid 70's Fenders, but just every so often come across a truly surprising one. I'm amazed by a local '78 Ash body / Rosewood board Strat that is probably just over 8 lbs., resonant as can be and plays really well. Original everything including frets. To the OP, I'd never have figures the rise in value of this era of Fender, so it'll probably continue to rise in value, albeit slowly. It's great that you love it.
     
  10. LoganKade

    LoganKade Member

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    Here are some pics of it if anyone's curious. They aren't the best because I'm the dope who scratched up the lens on my iPhone camera. Sometimes I consider selling it for a guitar that better suits my playing. This one sure isn't easy to bend on, haha

    [​IMG]

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  11. fumbler

    fumbler Member

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    You didn't mention the hardtail. Sorry to say that's probably another (minor) strike against it in the price department.
     
  12. serial

    serial Member

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    Your 77 is not 100% original if it's the one in that pic. Guard, knobs, switch and pickup covers were black in 77. All white wasn't back until 1982 or so (after 1975). White guards changed to black in 1976.
    70s Strats aren't huge investment guitars, but there are some really good ones out there. I'd LOVE a good Antigua Fender. I started playing guitar in the 70s, so those are the guitars I lusted after. A lot of the bad reputation that they have is overblown. Same with Norlin LPs-I've owned some awesome ones (and some very average ones).
     
  13. LoganKade

    LoganKade Member

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    Really, Serial? :/ that really upsets me to be completely honest, because the store I bought it from claimed it to be "100%" original. I mean, I partially take the blame for not doing me research and making an impulse buy, but still. Not very cool of them. What would you say the guitar is valued at now?
     
  14. capnjim

    capnjim Senior Member

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    Not sure if this is true or not, I have seen other 70's strats with white parts. fender was notorious for using up any left over parts.
    It will slowly go up in price, but, in my opinion, any Fenders with the serial number on the headstock, 76-77 are not as collectable as the pre '77.
    Probably a killer guitar. Unless you are really hard up for cash, I would hang on to it and play the crap out if it!
     
  15. serial

    serial Member

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    Frankly, that's not a huge devaluing feature. A few bucks here or there, but the range on 70s Strats is pretty wide anyway. I'd look under the guard just to make sure it wasn't routed at all-that's the most common reason for a changed guard, although a lot of black ones got the white guards to look like Clapton's I suppose.
    I've never seen an original white guard on a 77-79-it's pretty common knowledge about the plastics that were used and when. Any unused parts were probably gone in 75/76 when the black guards were mismatched with the white knobs and covers (ugh). Mocha ("Walnut") was not rare-neither was Antigua, contrary to more modern revisionist history. White guards were replaced by black ones in late 75 and returned in 80 (although those would have "S9" serials in many cases.
    Here's a 100% original 77 Strat (next to my 78 Tele Custom):
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2012
  16. LoganKade

    LoganKade Member

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    I'll try to post a pic of the insides at some point. The thing about me and this guitar is that I love the way it sounds, but not the way it handles, if that makes sense. It's got kind of that gritty vintage sound going for it but it's difficult for me to play on compared to even lower end strats ($500 and less). So idk, I'm in a rut haha
     

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