A British flavored player looking for a Fender style amp.. Input please

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by melvins, Mar 15, 2015.

  1. melvins

    melvins Supporting Member

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    Alright guys,

    I'm new to the Fender camp and have never really been a fan but appreciate the tones.

    From what I've heard I think I like Princeton tones but am worried it wouldn't keep up with the band.

    We play blues/rock with a semi hard hitting drummer. My amps have consisted of mainly a Matchless SC30 and or a Lightning. Just picked up a Marshall JCM40 as well and am surprised how well it sounds after some tube swaps.

    With that said, is there a louder Princeton? I think I like that 6V6 "squishyness", if that make sense.

    I plan on selling or trading my SC30 to fund this..
     
  2. sublimeaudio

    sublimeaudio Silver Supporting Member

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    There are some Princeton like amps that have more power (and bigger speakers) than the standard Princeton. My vote is the Louis Electric Princetone. You can put 6L6 tubes in it to get more power/headroom (28W). It also has a 12" speaker and sounds big.
    I think Headstrong also makes a higher powered version, but generally you'll need to use 6L6 tubes to get that power. With 2 6V6 tubes, you can only get up to around 20 watts, but that may not be enough for what you describe.
     
  3. 335guy

    335guy Member

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    Well, the Fender Princeton Reverb Amp tops out at 15 watts, whether you get a vintage one or a Reissue. You can get a bit more volume from one if you go to a more efficient speaker and use JJ 6V6's, which are a nice, modern tube. Sort of a cross between a 6V6 and a 6L6.

    But there are some "clones" that reportedly have a bit more volume. For those, look to Allen Amps, Headstrong, Clark, Vintage Sound, etc. Those are more modern interpretations of the Princeton Reverb. BTW, A Fender Deluxe Reverb also uses 6V6 tubes and is noticeably louder. It does sound a little different than a Princeton Reverb, but still retains the Fender sound.
     
  4. Custom50

    Custom50 Member

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    The Princeton is sort of it's own thing. The next step up is the deluxe but it sounds quite noticeably different.
     
  5. Rumble5

    Rumble5 Member

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    As a long time Marshall guy myself, I picked up a '66 Pro Reverb last year. I got a couple British voiced speakers and an attentuator and swapped some tubes. I run the amp on "7". When I roll my guitar volume back I get classic Blackface Fender cleans with all the crisp snap, and then when I turn the guitar volume all the way up I can get some really nasty dirty tones that sit somewhere in between a Fender tweed tone and early Marshall breakup. Not sure if there are other amps that will do that, but it's the perfect option for me.
     
  6. jrbanjo

    jrbanjo Member

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    I have a 75 Silverface and it's got the most amazing clean tone you've ever heard...love it...but (at least mine) CANNOT keep up with a band. Unless everyone is mic'd and playing low volume, and getting monitor mixes then forget it.

    I've tried many different times over the years and it's the same result, the Princeton just cannot stay clean. And mine doesn't really sound that great, in my opinion with the natural breakup. I do probably need fresh tubes and perhaps a newer speaker would help. Mine has all the original components as far as I can tell. But again, the clean tone on about 4 is to die for.

    Now, it's PERFECT and plenty loud for jamming at home but mine has never been able to handle it with a set of drums in the room.

    YMMV.
     
  7. doublescale1

    doublescale1 FSR Tele Silver Supporting Member

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    look into a Deluxe Reverb - vintage or re-issue. It's 22 watts of 6V6 power, a bigger voice than the Princeton, but still has the 6V6 sag quality that people like about that power tube - Peter Green seemed to have liked them quite a bit. The Brit-voiced speaker thing that Rumble5 talks about with his Pro Reverb can work with the Deluxe Reverb. Depending on how much clean headroom you need, the Pro Reverb (40 watt 2X12) may work better than the Deluxe (22 watt 1X12) but both will give you trad. Fender clean.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2015
  8. WayneM

    WayneM Member

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    The first Marshalls were based on the Fender Bassman......you might want check one out!
     
  9. ChampReverb

    ChampReverb Silver Supporting Member

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    Princeton Reverb II

    20W, 12" speaker

    -bEn r.
     
  10. Guinness Lad

    Guinness Lad Silver Supporting Member

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    Rivera makes a great Fender sounding amp which most of the time is el34 tubes. This might get you where you want to be.
     
  11. Ephi82

    Ephi82 Member

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    Precisely what I was going to suggest. I have a '67 Blackface Pro and it can get a lot of great tones, from classic Fender clean to over driven Fender sweet distortion that is probably as good as if not better than the early British Marshall sound.

    For whatever reason, these amps are not as sought of as a Princeton or Deluxe, but are much more big gig ready. A Princeton must have PA support beyond a small/mid sized pub, and a Deluxe is borderline in a larger bar/pub without a PA.
     
  12. bluesjuke

    bluesjuke Disrespected Elder

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    Ha, I knew this was coming.

    It's smaller brother the Tweed Pro may be an option too.
    Plenty of volume and fullness yet can be driven easier for your "squishy".
     
  13. slider313

    slider313 Silver Supporting Member

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    A brown Pro or Super would be the ticket.
     
  14. SlyStrat

    SlyStrat Supporting Member

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    The '68 Custom Deluxe Reverb. The Custom channel is close to a Marshall. The Vintage more like a Fender. The Celestion speaker helps too.
     
  15. sixty2strat

    sixty2strat Member

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    Blackface Bassman. Cheap and you can use any size of cab. a 1x12 with an inefficient speaker works great.
     
  16. melvins

    melvins Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the responses so far guys.

    I guess I forgot to mention, I'd prefer a semi compact combo.

    I just tried looking up "Fender tweed pro". Do they still make these?

    I don't know much about Fenders.. What exactly makes an amp a "tweed"? Just the covering?
     
  17. Rumble5

    Rumble5 Member

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    The tweeds were made in the 50's and are very different amps than the Blackface and Silverface amps. The tweeds were less powerful and had a great deal of natural distortion while Fender amps tended to get more powerful and cleaner which each successive decade.

    Besides the extra breakup, the tweeds also had strong mids while the BF and SF amps had tons of bass and treble and far less midrange. The Blues and Hot Rod series currently in production are supposed to be based more on the tweed sound (though some will argue they are not similar) and they tend to have more midrange and breakup than the BF reissues.

    The tweeds were literally the precursors to Marshall amps, and the first Marshall was a replication of a tweed Bassman circuit. From that point on Marshalls and Fenders diverged, with Marshall getting increasingly dirtier and Fender increasingly cleaner.
     
  18. bluesjuke

    bluesjuke Disrespected Elder

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    Victoria & Clark among others do.
    I had a JTM45 and a Pro and found some similarities between the two.

    Cleans and breakup are nice and at 28 watts no worries being heard well in a band mix.
     
  19. supercreep

    supercreep Member

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  20. tele_jas

    tele_jas Member

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    I really wish you could try a "Fender" voiced amp before taking the plunge! I've been a "British" voiced amp player for over 10 years now, and just last year I went on a "Blackface" quest and tried a few GREAT Blackface voiced amps: (Bogner Shiva, Tone King Imperial, Allan Encore). While I LOVED them while playing them by their self, I hated them in a band setting. I really missed that upper-mid-range that British amps offer and realized that's what I really *needed* in my guitar tone.

    On a similar note..... I also, recently, ended up getting a Mesa Mark V. I don't like the "Clean" or "Fat" modes, they sound too "American" for me, but I LOVE the Tweed mode! It has that upper mid-range that I've become accustomed to in my British voiced amps, but has a nice low-mid that American amps are known for too. So, maybe you might look at an amp that is Tweed voiced or with a nice Tweed option? It would be a nice meeting place for both Am and Brit voiced amps.
     

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