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A Good Song To Master

theHoss

Member
Messages
1,248
Howdy,

I am a long time guitarist looking to improve my abilities. I have started taking lessons again which are providing me a solid theory and technique background. I would like to begin learning songs that I could work on at home, something that is complete with a solo guitar. (i.e. not the lead to Black Magic woman, or Stairway to Heaven). I would like the piece to be complete with one guitar.

Can you recommend one that might be a good choice. Here are the criteria.

1) Intermediate level
2) Any type (jazz, blues, folk, whatever)
3) Complete as a solo guitar.

Thanks much!
 

Kappy

Member
Messages
14,033
Midsummer's Daydream (Rick Emmet, Triumph)
The Clap or Mood for a Day (Steve Howe, Yes)
Solo guitar arrangements of Bach, look for preludes, etc
Chet Atkins solo tunes
Jerry Reid solo tunes
Joe Pass (anything from the Virtuoso series of CDs --just him playing solo)

That oughta' get you started. Good luck!
 

Clifford-D

Member
Messages
17,070
A good place to start would be to get a good handle on who does what.

Blues is great for solo guitar, check out Joe Pass

If you want separation between Bass, melody and chords check out
Tuck Andress or Martin Taylor or George Van Eps or Howard Alden or ???

I happen to love Bill Frisells approach to solo guitar. With his minimalist
approach and broken clock ideas.

Then there is Chet Atkins, Michael Hedges, Leo Kottke, John Rebourne and so on.

Every one of these guys, living or dead, has material, books you can study and learn from.

Look and see what tunes they have chosen, figure out the 'why' of it.

Good luck.

Here is a link to some Frisell transcriptions

http://www.geocities.com/enalnitram/book.html?20079
 

Clifford-D

Member
Messages
17,070
Those are great suggestions, thanks! I will look into one of them.
I dig my Monkey, but not as much as my Greenline od by SPF, I pump my Monkey into the Greenline

Of course for $39.00 the Monkey is the best od deal on the planet.
 

willhutch

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,909
I find jazz blues a good way to increase overall knowledge and ability. Here are some reasons:

1) It is a crossover point into jazz harmony. Its just a step removed from stuff the blues/rock guys dig. As such you can apply much of the pentatonic wanker (said with love) vocab.

2) The stuff you learn can be applied to more basic blues settings. Hip jazz turnarounds often transfer back to basic blues changes

3) Standard jazz moves exist here: ii-V-I, I-VI-II-V, tritone substitution, etc. Familiarity with these changes clues you into a lot of harmonic maneuvers you hear in jazz and pop standards.

4) It lends itself well to solo guitar. Walking basslines punctuated with chord chops, spiced up by single-note lines are huge fun to play, and entertaining to listeners.

I love jazz blues because you can tap into badass SRV type stuff, or you can tickle the ears with more far-out jazzy stuff. It is a style with cross over appeal - the guys at your local blues jam will dig it as well as the jazz guys. It is a great platform from which to play solo guitar.
 

theHoss

Member
Messages
1,248
I dig my Monkey, but not as much as my Greenline od by SPF, I pump my Monkey into the Greenline

Of course for $39.00 the Monkey is the best od deal on the planet.

Tone,

I love my monkey too. I have 2 USAs and one rehoused TB. Not sure if this was a mispost, but I just wanted to let you know we are in the same boat.
 

theHoss

Member
Messages
1,248
I find jazz blues a good way to increase overall knowledge and ability. Here are some reasons:

1) It is a crossover point into jazz harmony. Its just a step removed from stuff the blues/rock guys dig. As such you can apply much of the pentatonic wanker (said with love) vocab.

2) The stuff you learn can be applied to more basic blues settings. Hip jazz turnarounds often transfer back to basic blues changes

3) Standard jazz moves exist here: ii-V-I, I-VI-II-V, tritone substitution, etc. Familiarity with these changes clues you into a lot of harmonic maneuvers you hear in jazz and pop standards.

4) It lends itself well to solo guitar. Walking basslines punctuated with chord chops, spiced up by single-note lines are huge fun to play, and entertaining to listeners.

I love jazz blues because you can tap into badass SRV type stuff, or you can tickle the ears with more far-out jazzy stuff. It is a style with cross over appeal - the guys at your local blues jam will dig it as well as the jazz guys. It is a great platform from which to play solo guitar.
That is what I am talking about. Any suggestions on a song for a starting point? Thanks much. I might take this post to my teacher and see what he suggests? Thanks again!
 

Clifford-D

Member
Messages
17,070
Howdy,

I am a long time guitarist looking to improve my abilities. I have started taking lessons again which are providing me a solid theory and technique background. I would like to begin learning songs that I could work on at home, something that is complete with a solo guitar. (i.e. not the lead to Black Magic woman, or Stairway to Heaven). I would like the piece to be complete with one guitar.

Can you recommend one that might be a good choice. Here are the criteria.

1) Intermediate level
2) Any type (jazz, blues, folk, whatever)
3) Complete as a solo guitar.

Thanks much!
Mel Bay has a great study on jazz tunes called

Jazz Guitar Standards I & II

You get a Lead sheet, Chord Melody, Comping and single note solo

Each tune is a package, a complete study.

And each tune is done by a real pro

Jack Wilkins, Chris Buzzelli, Syd Jacobs, and more, more.

Great study

Martin Taylor has a 'how he does it" book.

Tuck Andress has an intensive video

Studies, studies everywhere.

We guitarists are more lucky than any other instrument
as to the amount of modern guitarist literature available.
 

drfrankencopter

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,168
In a rock vein I've been having a blast learning Andy Timmons' "Electric Gypsy". Sure it's rock with bass and drums accompanyment, but there's enough melody in the tune that it can work as a solo performance as well.

Once learning how to play the tune there's some neat lessons to be learned in terms of how Andy incorperates some chromaticism in tasfeful spots. Theres some blues licks thrown in, some rock licks, and some other stuff, including a 1st solo played entirely with tapped harmonics.

Cheers,

Kris
 

theHoss

Member
Messages
1,248
Mel Bay has a great study on jazz tunes called

Jazz Guitar Standards I & II

You get a Lead sheet, Chord Melody, Comping and single note solo

Each tune is a package, a complete study.

And each tune is done by a real pro

Jack Wilkins, Chris Buzzelli, Syd Jacobs, and more, more.

Great study

Martin Taylor has a 'how he does it" book.

Tuck Andress has an intensive video

Studies, studies everywhere.

We guitarists are more lucky than any other instrument
as to the amount of modern guitarist literature available.
Thanks again. I ended up getting both and an accompanying CD set from amazon used. All said it was about $40. Thanks for the input, I think this will be exactly what I am looking for.
 

theHoss

Member
Messages
1,248
It was a different book. There is I & II each with 22 songs, then there is an accompanying book that has all 44 songs on disc.
 

dets1

Member
Messages
4,129
Here's a chord tutorial for solo guitar that I wrote several years ago. It's for the I-VI-II-V progression. It's all done in the key of G but the chords are all movable forms, so you can used them in any key.

http://www.jimsoloway.com/lessons/lessons.htm

The diagrams are all laid out as images of the fingerboard with the fret positions on the left. If you have any trouble understanding the layouts, feel free to ask and I'll do my best to explain.
some nice voicings. thanks.
 

Bo Faulkner

Member
Messages
3,825
:agree I been messing with this tonight. I am new to him. Wow what a player

In a rock vein I've been having a blast learning Andy Timmons' "Electric Gypsy". Sure it's rock with bass and drums accompanyment, but there's enough melody in the tune that it can work as a solo performance as well.

Once learning how to play the tune there's some neat lessons to be learned in terms of how Andy incorperates some chromaticism in tasfeful spots. Theres some blues licks thrown in, some rock licks, and some other stuff, including a 1st solo played entirely with tapped harmonics.

Cheers,

Kris
 

Guinness Lad

Member
Messages
15,865
Midsummer's Daydream (Rick Emmet, Triumph)
The Clap or Mood for a Day (Steve Howe, Yes)
Solo guitar arrangements of Bach, look for preludes, etc
Chet Atkins solo tunes
Jerry Reid solo tunes
Joe Pass (anything from the Virtuoso series of CDs --just him playing solo)

That oughta' get you started. Good luck!
You want the guy to quit or what? That's brutal list, I would have done the same.
 

The Captain

Member
Messages
12,471
Actually reading the OP and answering the question asked....

Nothing Else MAtters by Metallica.

Fingerstyle intro co-written by Michael Kamen
Interesting arpeggiated verse and chorus parts
Groovy bridge section
Nice solo, not too difficult, but hard enought to be interesting

"One" is another song by them that plays well as a solo piece, but it gets a little tricky toward the end. It's a work in progress for me. The first half has a series of short solos interspersed with really cool syncopated verse parts with a time sig change from 4/4 to 3/4 for the end of the chorus and then back again. It works well to end the song just before the brutal triplets start. I had a student do that for an audition into a school music programme, and it worked well. The tapping solo and the harmonised descending triplet figure lines after the solo are great exercises in themselves though.
Orion is a straight instrumental by them that is great fun to play.

Don't Cry or Sweet Child by Gunners are great songs to learn as complete instrumental pieces in themselves, so is Civil War.

And I'll probably get hosed for this, but Enter Sandman is not a music store anthem for nothing !! Great riffs, cool solo.

U2, Streets is another good one to just play.

Purple Haze, Hey Joe, esp if you address all the fills Jimi played.

Pearl Jam - Betterman, Yellow Ledbetter, RVM, In Hiding, Jeremy, Alive . If you go to www.giventowail.com you get all their tabs plus if you look in the covers section, you will see a bunch of great songs by the Who and lots of others, lots of ideas there.

Layla - Unplugged version
Dire Straits - Sultans, Romeo and Juliet
Floyd - Time, Comfortably Numb, ABITW Pt 2 (this is agreat song, and an approachable cool solo, Wish You Were Here, Shine On Pt 5, Money has a great riff, but a big jammy solo.
Smoke on the Water, not entirely joking here, saw this for the first time ever recently, and thought, hey, everybody knows the intro, but how many can actually play the whole song, including the solo. Nothing too hard in the solo.

Lenny Kravitz - Are You Goin' My Way
Son House/JAck White - Death Letter, Seven Nation Army (mmmmm, slide)

ZZ Top - la grange, gimme all your loving
jeff buckley - hallelujah

led zep immigrant song, gallow's pole, black dog
 
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