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A little solo Jazz piano to blow your mind

Neer

Silver Supporting Member
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12,734
Sal Mosca was a Tristano disciple and musical genius. One of the greatest pianists I've ever heard. He was sort of a recluse--had a bunch of students, though. I have an acquaintance (guitarist) who detailed his studies with Sal to me and they were extensive and grueling.

Anyway, I made this video to share this treatment of There Will Never Be Another You. Hope you enjoy!

 

eliot1025

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,600
Well, he seems to have an interesting harmonic sense but I can't say I enjoyed it. I appreciate you giving me the chance to hear it, though. I'd listen to more of his playing - he merits my attention.
 

Neer

Silver Supporting Member
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12,734
Well, he seems to have an interesting harmonic sense but I can't say I enjoyed it. I appreciate you giving me the chance to hear it, though. I'd listen to more of his playing - he merits my attention.

He could get pretty far out there and away from the tune in almost every respect--rhythmically and harmonically-- but he never lost his way. He can be a very challenging listen.

A friend of mine studied with Warne Marsh and told me that Warne said that Sal got too far out even for him and they had played together since the '40s! Sal was coming from the old school--1930s Jazz and some classical, so it was a different bag than cats had later on when this was recorded.

Maybe you'd like this better:

 

tribalfusion

Member
Messages
7,581
Sal Mosca was a Tristano disciple and musical genius. One of the greatest pianists I've ever heard. He was sort of a recluse--had a bunch of students, though. I have an acquaintance (guitarist) who detailed his studies with Sal to me and they were extensive and grueling.

Anyway, I made this video to share this treatment of There Will Never Be Another You. Hope you enjoy!

Thanks for posting that. I knew of him a bit as well.

If you like this you would really like Richie Beirach especially his Maybeck Solo Album which is astounding.
 

Neer

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
12,734
Thanks for posting that. I knew of him a bit as well.

If you like this you would really like Richie Beirach especially his Maybeck Solo Album which is astounding.
I like that recording very much. Richie's version of All The Things You Are from that record really taught me a lot.
 

Neer

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
12,734
Quick great story about Sal Mosca:

Sal was at a NYC club to see Charlie Parker back in the '40s--a club where Sal was a familiar face--and Parker's piano player was running late. The owner of the club asked Sal to sit in until the regular player arrived, and Sal obliged.

Sal got up there and they started playing--he didn't know what tune they were playing or the key, so he started exploring. About 2 choruses in, Bird leans over to him and says, "It's a blues, man."
 

SamBooka

Member
Messages
2,222
Is like being lost in Austria
Don't really know where I am going but the scenery is very nice
 

russ6100

Member
Messages
4,574
Thanks for posting Neer! :aok

I dig it....didn't find it particularly "out" at all.

I probably would like it even better if he swung it a little more...it is said that those from the Tristano school weren't particularly known for their "swingingness", although I think Mr. Konitz can swing his ass off....

I'd heard of him but never heard him that I know of - Thanks again!!
 

Neer

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
12,734
Here's a great clip of Sal Mosca and Warne Marsh live in 1981 playing a Marsh-Konitz tune, Sax of a Kind. Sal's solo is a great example of his playing--sit back and listen to him go:

[SOUNDCLOUD]http://soundcloud.com/ionahoopii/sax-of-a-kind-warne-marsh-and[/SOUNDCLOUD]
 






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