A little whine before dinner? (Pickguard content)

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by Mighty Melvin, Jan 4, 2018.


  1. Mighty Melvin

    Mighty Melvin Member

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    I've got this nice (for me) guitar and this pickguard. The pickguard is supposed to be a replacement but the holes are pretty mismatched to the holes in the body, as is to be expected.

    I really, really don't want to plug the body holes and drill for the new pickguard. I'll always know that that hacky mess is under there and it will always be a contamination.

    What I should do is buy material and make a correct pickguard, but I have this one here and it's tortoise, which brings with it special cost and complication to discard and replace it.

    What would you do?
     
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  2. Lobotomie

    Lobotomie Member

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    New holes in the body is what I would do.
     
  3. Floyd Eye

    Floyd Eye Member

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    Ditch the bad guard and have Tony at Pickguardian make you a proper one.
     
  4. Ayrton

    Ayrton Member

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    I am the same way about extra holes under the guard. Yes it is hidden, but I know it is there, mocking me.

    Get a correct guard
     
  5. Crunchtime

    Crunchtime Member

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    maybe you could order a pickguard from Warmoth and have them not drill any of the mounting screw holes. Then you can use the old guard to mark proper hole locations.
     
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  6. Mighty Melvin

    Mighty Melvin Member

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    Yeah, it's just crappy. I would never be happy I did it.

    I'm actually pretty good at duplicating pickguards (router table and tracing bearings), but it's a dismal outcome after buying this one and being faced with buying material that's at least fifty bucks.
    .
     
  7. Ayrton

    Ayrton Member

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    I hate cutting my own. Makes a hella mess in the the shop
     
  8. cardinal

    cardinal Member

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    I’d cut a new pickguard or redrill the guard you already have. Doubt anyone would notice the extra holes in the guard unless they were really staring at it.
     
  9. Mighty Melvin

    Mighty Melvin Member

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    I thought about doing that. I'd rather do violence to a disposable piece of plastic than to the guitar itself. The guitar certainly looks nice with it sitting there.
    .
     
  10. KGWagner

    KGWagner Member

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    There's no sense in perpetuating a mistake or poor production values/quality control. I would move toward the solution that brings it back to "correct". If the holes in the body are in the wrong place, plug 'em and redrill to fit the standard 'guard. No shame in that. In fact, it's the noble thing to do. If the 'guard's holes are wrong, curse the supplier of the wrong 'guard and buy a properly made new one. Write the bad one off to experience and inform the supplier you won't be buying any more of their product. They'll either learn a lesson or lose business. Either outcome is good.
     
  11. Mighty Melvin

    Mighty Melvin Member

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    That's a pretty good line of thought. Now all I would have to do is find out which is correct.
    .
     
  12. KGWagner

    KGWagner Member

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    Aye, there's the rub.

    Oddly enough, even though the OEMs are the genesis of most "standards", they're often the worst violators of them. High volume production often leads to shortcuts that a more particular/painstaking builder would not engage in. Witness string trees. Anybody who's ever taken apart a Fender factory-issue fiddle can tell you lotsa stories about fastener hole location, perpendicularity, depth, etc. They can look great on the face while being surprisingly slipshod under the skin. Kinda like American cars from the '60s and '70s. Hammer to fit, paint to match, do your best and caulk the rest.
     

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