A Question About GLS plugs and Soldering

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by Farbulous, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. Farbulous

    Farbulous Member

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    Inside the GLS pancake jack there are two connection points. One is higher up and on the side and the other is lower down and seem to be connected to the base. My question is this: can I solder the ground wire directly to the inside of the body of the plug instead of the lower connection point? Will that achieve the same thing?

    Thanks!
     
  2. ARC Effects

    ARC Effects Member

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    Yes you can but can I ask why you'd want to do that?
     
  3. Farbulous

    Farbulous Member

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    Because the ground wire, when I twist it, is too large for the hole in the connector.
     
  4. justonwo

    justonwo Member

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    You don't feed the ground wire (shield) through the hole. You lay the twisted ground into the little "stem" that holds the strain relief (i.e. the lower part you are talking about) and you solder to that.
     
  5. jnepo1

    jnepo1 Silver Supporting Member

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    The ground lead is the lower lead. The hole is to help secure the wire and solder to the lead, as the solder melts it will fill in the punched hole. It makes no sense in soldering the ground to the body when you have a lead that accepts the solder better for a more solid connection.
     
  6. walkers

    walkers Member

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    I trim off some of the shielding first (just enough) to get it down to size, twist it, tin it, bend a small right angle in it - then insert in the hole and solder.
     
  7. tdk8709

    tdk8709 Senior Member

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    :agree
     
  8. Farbulous

    Farbulous Member

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    From what I have seen I thought you weren't supposed to cut any of the filaments, but that makes a lot of sense. If the twisted wire wasn't so thick I could easily make that right-angle like I do with the actual inner wire (which is much thinner already).

    One other questions here... and I only ask because I am a super newb at this, but last night I couldn't get the solder to wet... like the tip of the soldering iron was just burning it away, and not tinning. This thing is brand new, but it only goes up to 450 degrees. Is that the problem? Do I need a hotter iron? Because this thing was working the other night and now I can't get the solder to flow. Thanks again all.
     
  9. justonwo

    justonwo Member

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    Solder flows to surfaces that are hot. You heat the area you are trying to solder to. You don't just melt solder onto that area. The thing is, molten solder also helps to transfer heat to the working surface so you want to heat the surface with the iron and work a bit of solder between the iron and the working surface. Once the surface gets hot enough, the solder will start to flow. If you don't get your working surface hot enough, the solder will just bead up. This can be a bit of a challenge with a pencil tip iron and a big twisted shield and plug end, because you don't have the surface area to transfer a lot of heat with a penil tip and the shield is a pretty big heat sink.

    It does take practice, though. Also, after you solder each joint, use a damp sponge to clean the tip and then apply more solder to the tip. This will help keep it clean and will improve iron performance.
     
  10. Ed Reed

    Ed Reed Senior Member

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    I spit the shield in two and twist it up and tin (looks like t with the top being the positive) I have a long soldering tool that's used to remove components from a board, one end is tapered. I lift the lower lug up and enlarge the hole slightly with the tapered end of the tool. One of the sides I solder to the lug by going through it and the other side of the shield I fold back outside the jacket for a mechanical connection when the plug is assembled.

    Yes and yes to keeping the iron clean and tined.
     
  11. Farbulous

    Farbulous Member

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    Bought a hotter iron - that did the trick. Cables are coming together like butter!
     
  12. MegaMan9

    MegaMan9 Member

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    Interesting technique, which cable are you using ?
     
  13. MegaMan9

    MegaMan9 Member

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  14. Ed Reed

    Ed Reed Senior Member

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    Made by Horizon, it's their Mogami clone.
     
  15. Ed Reed

    Ed Reed Senior Member

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    Here's a few cameraphone pics of how I do it.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  16. mike@nortoncable.com

    mike@nortoncable.com Member

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    Be sure not to overheat these plugs either.
    If you heat the plate/body up too much the plastic which keeps the plug shaft tight to the base melts out of spec and makes for a faulty plug....
     
  17. MegaMan9

    MegaMan9 Member

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    Can't really see from the pictures, but if I understand correctly, you have a piece of tinned shield not soldered to anything, folded back, touching both the outer jacket and the plug when assembled ?
     
  18. Ed Reed

    Ed Reed Senior Member

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    yes, it's under the cable
     

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