A Question about New Jersey

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23,771
The real issue is the drivers. I never thought anyone could top Boston drivers...but then came NJ. Driving as contact sport
It was just notorious, everywhere we went - especially around DC, Maryland, Virginia, Eastern Pennsylvania, Eastern West Virginia, and adjacent NYS: See a driver driving dangerously/inconsiderately/manically and the vehicle had Jersey plates on it - also, all down I-81 and I-95, in fact all the way to South Florida. Uncanny.

So my only query was, did considerate drivers from NJ rent a car without NJ plates and did some morons with no real connections to NJ happen to borrow a NJ plated SUV or car?

I am NOT an "after you, Alfonse" type driver and I drive a pretty brisk pace, myself. But these people seemed he!! bent on ruining the reputation of all NJ drivers, where-ever they happened to roam. When I shopped for used cars, I never bothered to look in NJ because I assumed the car had been tortured as usual. I bought one in Reading, PA and another in Alexandria, VA instead.
 

Jon C

Silver Supporting Member
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16,990
I have lived in NJ, Boston, and D.C.

Three different issues.

D.C.= most incompetent by far, spiked w so many lost out of towners.

Boston - cow paths made into roads now overwhelmed, very rude and hostile (and not particularly competent in many cases)

NJ- most skilled in some ways, greater volume means greater sheer numbers of incompetence and a-holes.

Boston was the worst.

Although I did get to use driving skills that would leave jaws dropped and risk a ticket when I did them in Seattle (eg, do a legal U-turn on a major downtown street (4th @ around Madison) and pull forward into a just- vacated parking meter space, with only minor correction needed).

:idea:dunno
 
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sws1

Member
Messages
10,617
I have lived in NJ, Boston, and D.C.

Three different issues.

D.C.= most incompetent by far, spiked w so many lost out of towners.

Boston - cow paths made into roads now overwhelmed, very rude and hostile (and not particularly competent in many cases)

NJ- most skilled in some ways, greater volume means greater sheer numbers of incompetence and a-holes.

Boston was the worst.

:idea:dunno
I was hesitant to chime in on the driving topic...BUT, you nailed it exactly with this.
 

RCM78

Member
Messages
5,680
Ah, forget the tomatoes, it's the musicians. I posted last week about Jerry Gaskill (Kings X) playing with my buddy in a little bar... Saturday I stopped to see them, Jerry was on it again and I was called up for a couple. One night last month I was the only one (out of four of us) who'd never toured 30,000+ arenas.

I've famously covered a local's gig at Paul's Tavern in Belmar while he was more famously jamming with Paul McCartney in London (he's in Little Steven's Disciples of Soul). A week later I was quick-called as 2nd guitar in a bar because 1st was Anthony Krizan (Spin Doctors, Lenny Kravitz). Recently did a fill-in and found out between sets that the drummer was from Nektar, one of my favorite bands back in the day and J.T. Bowen was a guest singer. Got a last-minute call yesterday to play acoustic with a couple of local guys in a hotel lobby in Asbury. Next month they'll be supporting their album in 3,000-seaters in Europe, but yesterday was just winging covers on acoustics (w/ bass & congas)... tight 3- and 4-part harmonies, lots of dynamics, dead-clean endings and everybody could play everything in any key to adjust for guest singers. And on and on...

It's not Nashville or Austin, but there's a cool vibe to being a musician around here. It's still true that you get gigs playing covers, but there are places dedicated to a slowly-growing original music scene. And one thing that distinguishes it from better-known music places is that everyone seems to support everybody. When you're bored and you don't have a gig, just go somewhere and it's a good bet that the PA will go, "hey, Mike's here. Get up here..."
Mike’s not embellishing at all. The jersey shore is such a great scene! I’m proud to be a part of it!
 

Jollyb

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,062
I grew up there. I left in 99' becuase of the taxes. Just couldn't get ahead. Bought a house in Florida bigger, half the price, more land and no State Tax.

That said.. when i was a kid living at home and not worrying about Taxes it was a great place to grow up. I have incredible memories.
 

Guitar55

Who was that masked man?
Messages
9,197
Glad you love coming to NJ, but I think you are oversimplifying things. I live 4 blocks outside of Newark's west ward. I'm in Newark all the time. Most of it doesn't look like crap. It has a thriving downtown and some well maintained residential areas. It has a long way to go for sure, but I bet I can name 10 cities in NJ that look more like crap than Newark, and many of them are in areas of the state you wouldn't expect.
South Orange?
 

Guitar55

Who was that masked man?
Messages
9,197
Born, raised and lived most of my adulthood in NJ. Great place to grow up. Beautiful beaches and farmlands, great culture being so close to NYC. The cities are in ruin and trying to rebuild slowly. I escaped 3 years ago due to taxes, weather, cost of living and traffic. Great decision, but I miss everyone I left behind.
 

DonaldDemon

Member
Messages
8,369
I'm always amazed at the paradox that this is the state with the worst reputation and most disliked and yet the residents are probably some of the most proud. How many other places are there where it's very common for people have tattoos of their state on them? That's not counting all the pride stickers on cars, the clothing, etc. I think it's weird and don't buy into all that but you see it everywhere here. I've seen so many more NJ tattoos lately it's insane. Maybe Texas is the only other state where that happens?
 
Messages
23,771
Maybe Texas is the only other state where that happens?
Texas is a good parallel.

The strange thing is, at least based on what I have seen, New Jersey is crazy diverse, from North to South with a bewildering variety of living settings - I mean, what you see when you look out the window. My first exposure was Vineland, and later I saw Newark, and with each successive environment I went into I was like "WTF?" how could this all be one state? And the NJ music IMO is like that, too. One area is Danny Gatton, another is Hip Hop and another is Klezmer.

Texas is also a lot more dis-associated from Lufkin to Austin, Paris to Brownsville, than most other states. And the music? The same thing. Which makes it so weird and ironic that there two Multiple Personality States would be so proud of a common Identity that I doubt really exists.
 

DonaldDemon

Member
Messages
8,369
Texas is a good parallel.

The strange thing is, at least based on what I have seen, New Jersey is crazy diverse, from North to South with a bewildering variety of living settings - I mean, what you see when you look out the window. My first exposure was Vineland, and later I saw Newark, and with each successive environment I went into I was like "WTF?" how could this all be one state? And the NJ music IMO is like that, too. One area is Danny Gatton, another is Hip Hop and another is Klezmer.

Texas is also a lot more dis-associated from Lufkin to Austin, Paris to Brownsville, than most other states. And the music? The same thing. Which makes it so weird and ironic that there two Multiple Personality States would be so proud of a common Identity that I doubt really exists.
You are absolutely right on the diversity thing and it is pretty shocking if you were to just drive through the state in several areas. You have the southern kinda feel down south and some areas southwest feel like you are in Alabama, especially all the farmland areas. There’s the mountain towns of the northwest Appalachians which feel more like New England, the urban areas up north by NYC, the coastal shore towns have their own beach vibe going on, the Pine Barrens are an ecosystem totally unique to themselves, etc. I can’t comment much on the music, I only know the scene I roll in for the most part and am kind of oblivious to the rest.
 

A440

Supporting Member
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4,610
What’s interesting is that there’s some division within the State of NJ. North and South are different due to the influences of NY and Philly. Some also debate whether there’s a Central Jersey or not.

North Jersey guys feel they know how to drive better than anyone else. I’ll keep my opinions to myself. :)

I just try to get along with everyone!
 
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thewalkingboss

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,577
What’s interesting is that there’s some division within the State of NJ. North and South are different due to the influences of NY and Philly. Some also debate whether there’s a Central Jersey or not.

North Jersey guys feel they know how to drive better than anyone else. I’ll keep my opinions to myself. :)

I just try to get along with everyone!
North and South Jersey are different, but not the way you would think. They are split along what I call the "Taylor Ham/Pork Roll Line". It runs from approximately the Toms River Bridge over to Seaside Heights, diagonally across the state up to about the point where I-78 crosses the Delaware River. North and east, the meat is called Taylor Ham. South and west, it is Pork Roll.
 

Gasp100

Supporting Member
Messages
20,601
Is there a state with a worse reputation? Not that I know of. Yet, it's overcrowded as **** here so obviously plenty of people like being here. My wife hates it but she is from the midwest, which I totally get after spending a lot of time there with her family. We are more brash than most other places in this country, kind of hard to handle if you grow up with the opposite. I don't mind it here, especially always living within 10 minutes of the ocean, I just wish there were less people. Eventually the cost of living will drive us out and being a surfer that doesn't leave us many options.
I grew up in Jersey and much prefer people talking straight and telling you to **** off in front of your face, vs. the dirty South where they greet you with a smile and end their sentences with "have a blessed day" while cursing you behind your back.
I'm a stranger in a strange land now... weird.
 


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