A Question for Guitar Players Who've Started in the Past Few Years

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by & You Don't Stop, Dec 7, 2017.


  1. & You Don't Stop

    & You Don't Stop Supporting Member

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    I'm interested to hear from players who are learning their instrument in this internet age, when the closest guitar lesson is just a mouse click away. What have you, as a beginner, found to be very valuable in really pushing your progress forward and helping to develop your style and technique?

    A certain practice method? Do you follow a certain youtuber? Subscribe to an app or teaching program?

    I'd love to hear about your journey.
     
  2. & You Don't Stop

    & You Don't Stop Supporting Member

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    Am I the only newb at tgp?
     
  3. Jonathan31

    Jonathan31 Member

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    Not a new player but even with all that is availiable on the internet I still am a big fan of finding a teacher in person. That is how I learned over a decade ago. Many people to fine being self taught but with a good teacher you will learn much much faster.
     
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  4. QuarterTone

    QuarterTone Member

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    JustinGuitar is great for a broad-based beginner overview. TrueFire is amazing for in-depth lessons on specific topics.
     
  5. Eddie 70

    Eddie 70 Member

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    I am a newbie player. Been trying to teach myself for about 4 years now. No telling how many bad habits I have learned on my own. I have used Justinguitar. Marty Schwartz, You Tube, etc. I know I should find someone to take lessons from. I don't think I have progressed as fast or as far as I could have taking lessons and doing what I am doing.
     
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  6. Rezin

    Rezin Member

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    I've been playing for a while, and I'm not sure that asking for advice from other beginners is the way to go. Looking back, I would say that to progress you have to play fairly regularly, even if not for very long at a time. In-person lessons from a good teacher are invaluable. But on your own, I'd study some theory. People tend to pooh-pooh theory, but theory is really a shortcut to playing well. You don't have to get deep into the esoteric stuff, which people like to show off with, but you should know enough that you know how chords are formed, you should be able to look at a chord and say, "Maybe I'll try the seventh' and then go to the seventh (usually by moving one finger.) That kind of thing. And for most beginners, I think it would be invaluable to learn the Pentatonic scale shapes. If you worked at it a little -- say a half hour a day for a couple of weeks -- you'd know the shapes and how they work. Then you could get a couple of backing tracks and play lead over them, which is not only fun, especially for a beginner, because it's like playing with a band, but because it's almost like working with a metronome, which is also quite helpful. A little further along, I'd spend a few bucks to buy a looper, so you can records some tracks and then sit back and listen to what you actually sound like.

    By the way, I did most of my theory study on airplanes, when I was traveling a lot. You don't necessarily have to have a guitar in your hand to study theory. Memorizing the fretboard is also seriously important, and for that, it is best to have the guitar in your hand.
     
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  7. Dirty_Tones

    Dirty_Tones Supporting Member

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    In my experience I haven't been afraid to do things that would seem otherwise tedious and repetitive, like pentatonic runs and playing simple licks 360 degrees around the neck. This type of work helps at a fine grain level and helps you get more bang for your buck should you decide to start using a live instructor.
     
  8. Caprica

    Caprica Supporting Member

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    ^ this
     
  9. Tag

    Tag Gold Supporting Member

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    The realization that on line lessons can never even approach the effectiveness of one on one, live lessons.
     
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  10. 556_Chris

    556_Chris Member

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    If I may.

    I am 44.

    It has always been a bucket list item of mine to learn how to play guitar. Last fall (2016), I picked up a Ibanez RG6003fm from GC during their month long guitar sale. I paid $269.00 new, got me a Line 6 amp, case and stand...all for what I WAS going to pay for an ESP LTD 401 alone...

    So I sought out and was recommended an instructor at a local music store. I like the store, been there before and I still support it today.

    The instructor was only dead set on Mel Bey Vol 1 then Mel Bey vol 2. etc and 'maybe' 5 min of a simple tab to learn. I was getting bored AF and not wanting to go anymore. Dude didn't seem like he was in the room, wasn't well organized and simply wasn't motivating to be around.

    I started on the internet, found some youtube channels (Marty, Justin, etc) and then reluctantly, I checked out Fender Play.

    My ability and my learning took off. I have been going back and forth between Fender Play, some books, Marty/ Justin and supplementing Songsterr and Ultimate-Tab app's/ site on my tablet and lap top.

    I am enjoying what I am learning...and I am improving. Have a few decent pedals and I am happy with my progress. I get together with a good friend who knows how to shred and he gives skill sets to work, improve and riff's to master before we get together next.
     
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  11. Boeing bloke

    Boeing bloke Member

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    Finding a good teacher was invaluable from my perspective. While I wasn’t a total beginner, I needed a way to find my weak areas.

    The internet is a wealth of knowledge, but I found I advanced in leaps and bounds when a good teacher came into the picture. In my job and other hobbies I’ve learned that self assessment can almost never beat that extra set of eyes. And I haven’t dumped the internet entirely. If anything what I’ve learned from a teacher made me understand what I was seeing on the net and between the two have achieved more in 3 years than I did in my teens and early 20’s.

    Just my .02$.
     
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  12. mlowie

    mlowie Member

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    I picked up a guitar 3 years ago and snagged a copy of Gibson learn and master. Spent 6 months with the dvd's and random internet sites (all mentioned above).

    Then my wife got me an introductory lesson with a terrific teacher. He has been playing for 25+ years, degree in music, teaches music in a public school as his 'real' job. I improved so much quicker with him as he was able to provide feedback that the one-way internet sites can't give.

    The biggest issue i had with internet learning is i tended to bounce around too much as there is so much good stuff out there. I'd hit Justin or Marty and start to learn something cool, and see an alternative link to the right of the page with another cool song or technique and off i went.

    Having a live teacher with a set of goals for a weekly or biweekly lesson helped me focus my efforts which I feel allowed me to progress faster than on my own.
     

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