Acclimation to certain time sigs............

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by gainiac, Oct 12, 2006.

  1. gainiac

    gainiac Senior Member

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    3/4 4/4 (and permutations thereof) is pretty easy for most people.

    7/4 I have a good feel for too.

    5/4....throws me for a loop. When I attempt to write/play within 5/4 it has a malfunctioning robotic quality.

    Any of you folks ever have trouble getting used to the "feel" a certain sig implies?

    If so how did you work through it ands add it to your creative palette?
     
  2. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    I count and count until it's part of my soul. The more I focus on playing, singing, counting a grouping (5, 7, 9, 11, 13), the easier it becomes to hear and feel it when I'm listening to or playing music. There are still some Zappa tunes that I don't know the time signatures to (and I've been listening to them for years). There are even some that I know the time sig to but I still have trouble feeling without slowing them down (the 19/16 in Keep it Greasey for instance). But when it comes to most I can hear them right away from the work I've done on odd groupings.

    For 5, just pick out a few good tunes, "Take 5", "Mission Impossible Theme", "Money" by Pink Floyd, and a million others and make jam tracks out of the grooves.

    HTH!
     
  3. willhutch

    willhutch Supporting Member

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    The only reason 3/4 and 4/4 are so easy for us is that we hear and play them all the time. Those are the grooves that are part of our cultural DNA.

    To get the feel for other time signatures just requires exposure and familiarity - practice.

    Beyond that, I find it helpful to feel the sub-groupings of twos and threes. So 7, for instance, could be felt as 1,2-1,2-1,2,3. But you're probably already doing this.

    Hey - I never noticed that "Money" was in 5! Cool!
     
  4. gainiac

    gainiac Senior Member

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    Neither did I!!! What a groove it is too!
     
  5. gainiac

    gainiac Senior Member

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    19/16.........Yikes.....I haven't listened to Frank in a while. Keep it Greasey is a favorite though.
     
  6. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    Oops! My bad. Money's in 7. Sorry about that. Here's a list of tunes in 5 for y'all.

    Be warned that some of these entries are grossly inaccurate. I helped put some of that page together, but some putz kept putting stuff like Led Zep's "The Ocean" in 15/8 instead of 4/4 & 7/8 like it really is. I would change it and the troll would change it back. I even sited published sources, but the troll kept thinking of it as the more complicated 15/8. :confused:
     
  7. fumbler

    fumbler Member

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    A looooong time ago in high school band (during which I carried the trumpet; few people would say that I played it) I was taught to count tougher time signatures as seperate bars of two, three or four beats as needed; almost like a polyrhythm. It helps to bring out the accented beats and get a groove going.

    e.g. I'd count "Take Five" as one-two-three-one-two and I'd count "Money" as one-two-three-one-two-three-four.

    By the way, "Money" is definitely 7/8 except for the guitar break which is straight-up 4/4. In the DSOTM documentary Gilmour says that he didn't want to have to construct a solo over 7/8 (lazy sonofagun). The guitar break is really just a 12-bar blues progression!

    And I know better than to attempt Zappa.

    [EDIT] So I get up to go pee while I'm typing my reply and 4 responses appear before me. Solution? Dependstm.[/EDIT]

    -fumbler-
     
  8. GtrWiz

    GtrWiz Member

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    this is how I think of it too, break it down into smaller, more digestible bits, until you can really feel it.
     
  9. Dajbro

    Dajbro Member

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    I agree that listening is key. Back in college when I was on a huge Dave Holland, Steve Coleman, Greg Osby, Bela Bartok binge, listening to and transcribing their music (sometimes JUST the rhythms) really helped internalize things. When I wrote music back then, things would just naturally come out in different meters.

    David
     

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