Acoustic Guitar recording..

Smakutus

Member
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8,367
I am planning on doing some home recording using my old Roland 1680 and a Taylor guitar.. I like the way the Taylor sounds, but not the way it (or really any) acoustic sounds through those on board pick ups.

I was thinking of getting an amp to use and record direct from it.. I know nothing about acoustic amps.

Are there cool sounding effects pedals for recording acoustics direct rather than using an amp?

I also plan on getting a pick up that mounts in the sound hole and trying it out.. Plus I have a good sounding mic I can use to record it acoustically..

Any advice?

Thanks,
Jeff
 

kludge

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Do you have any sort of audio interface? Just one mic (a SM57 or cheap Chinese small diaphragm condenser) is all that's needed. Start with the mic 1-2 feet from the guitar, pointed at the neck-body joint. I like to do this with the mic along the neck, pointing back around a 45 degree angle. You might be able to do a little better with different placement, but you can do a lot worse. You can get better mics, etc, but this is going to be good, real good.
 

SackvilleDan

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2,087
If you don't like the piezo sound into the PA, you're not likely to enjoy it anymore through a mic'd amp, pedals, or anything else. Get a mic and an interface, and record the guitar live in the room.
 

makerdp

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786
You dont need an audio interface if you are recording into a Roland VS1680. It has pretty decent built-in mic pre's already and if you have the effects cards, some pretty decent reverbs to sweeten it up a bit.

However, I would record it with the mic as mentioned above but also go ahead record it directly with the built-in piezo as well. Just go straight into another channel on your 1680 and record them both at the same time. You might find a blending of the two will turn out nicely. It's a common trick. Unless you are using a larger diaphragm mic than an SM57, you might find you are lacking some of that "body" in the lows and low-mids. The onboard pickup can bring some of that back nicely.
 

buddaman71

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FWIW: i recorded this track years ago using my old 94 812ce, 2 condensor mics (AT4033 aimed at body and a KM184 aimed at the 12th fret) and a VS1680
i just get them close to where i think it will sound good, hit a chord and move around slightly until it sounds best to me. i also sometimes like to simultaneously record a track of the direct pickup to blend in with it's own wide stereo feed.

 

Blooby

Member
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1,810
I have heard some surprisingly good recordings with dynamic microphones like a 57, but I would invest in a decent condenser microphone. There are some great entry-level ones by Rode and Spark.

Nice music, buddaman. There's a prime example of the results you can't get with a piezo (at least not that I have ever heard).

Blooby
 

buddaman71

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Thx. That's from a collection of lullabies that were all recorded with same method, using 2 condenser mics to an old VS1680, in my 1 and 3 yr daughter's bedroom almost 20 years ago. Mostly composed/improvised in real-time to play them to sleep and recorded in single takes. (Other than a couple tunes with obvious overdubs I added after the initial takes.)

I've given CD of this to all new parent friends and family members over the years, and love it when the kids get older and tell me they loved it and listened to it many times growing up.

 
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tribedescribe

Member
Messages
859
Its standard practice to record a acoustic guitar with a small diaphram condenser mic aimed at the 12th or 14th fret. One mono sdc can work well in a band mix. Some people blend a LDC with the sdc to get a fuller sound for balleds and solo stuff. Micing a acoustic amp is going to sound weird.

If your on a budget I have heard good things about the little bondie mic below.

https://www.littleblondie.com/buy.html
 

tgartke

Member
Messages
305
You should check out 3sigma audio IRs for acoustic- its an easy $10 experiment that could make things much easier for you depending on what you're looking to do. All you need is a DAW to load the IR into.
 




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