Acoustic Guitar with an Electric Feel?

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by turbolx5oh, Jan 19, 2016.

  1. turbolx5oh

    turbolx5oh Member

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    Long time electric player here and I've never owned an acoustic but am in the market for an electric acoustic in the $700 range. My problem is that every one I try it is so far removed from an electric that I can't seem to find one that I can even entertain getting comfortable with. I realize I'm not going to get the exact feel and the they are two different instruments but I just need something that has a neck that is closer to an electric feel. I like a 60s style neck and don't care for thin(shred) or thick (50s) necks. The narrower the nut the better and preferably with a cutaway.

    Any suggestions on what I should try?
     
  2. Lewguitar

    Lewguitar Member

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    I don't find the necks themselves to be all that different.

    If you're used to light rock n roll strings with an unwound G string and a .010 or lighter E string, that's probably what's throwing you.

    Acoustics use heavier strings and usually higher action.

    Taylors are thought of as having necks similar electric guitar necks.

    Find something you're reasonably comfortable with, maybe with a 1 11/16" nut width, and have the action lowered as low as it'll go without buzzing.

    Have it restrung with light (not medium) strings.

    Spend some time getting used to it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2016
  3. lamenlovinit

    lamenlovinit Member

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    Taylor and Larrivee come to mind as the closest thing, while not being the same, as you can get with "real" acoustics. Larrivee can feel very familiar with their very flat compound radius.

    If it's for stage look into piezo equipped solid body guitars. I have an old parker fly (Joni used one alot), and you can find those for a bit more than your budget. I recently played a Epi 339 with piezo that would fit the bill for a reasonable price.
     
  4. Lo Blues

    Lo Blues Member

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    You can try a Yamaha. Some of those necks are quite small. But yeah, just put 10's on whatever you buy and that should make whatever guitar you choose a lot less intimidating.
     
  5. Axis29

    Axis29 Supporting Member

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    I have a bud who has a Taylor that felt just like an electric guitar. It was about the closest thing I've ever felt.
     
  6. justabubba

    justabubba Member

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    have acquired a couple of steel string guitars the past couple of years
    alvarez-yairi neck feels much more like an electric than the martin
    you should be able to find a good used alvarez-yairi for the budget you have allocated
     
  7. Crowder

    Crowder Dang Twangler Silver Supporting Member

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    The Godin A6 is worth checking out. I'm surprised how loud it is acoustically, considering there's no sound hole, and of course it was designed to be plugged in. But it makes a great couch guitar. Loud enough without being annoyingly loud, and the form factor is great for around-the-house use.
     
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  8. fatoni

    fatoni Member

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    Larrivee makes pretty cool guitars with flatter than typical necks which is good for that fast and smooth feel
     
  9. EricPeterson

    EricPeterson Member

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    Stratacoustics and teleacoustics basically just have a standard fender electric neck on them. That is the closest I have experienced, you will obviously sacrifice traditional acoustic tone (at least when played acoustically) otherwise I think taylor gets the nod, they usually have wider necks though, unless you get the 100 series, I think those are a narrower nut, at least my old 110 was.

    I say try a Taylor 110 or a 114.
     
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  10. lp_bruce

    lp_bruce Member

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    I've got a couple of Ovations and they definitely have an electric-like neck. They sound OK plugged in, though unplugged they aren't so good (to me). I've got a couple of Michael Kelly Hybrid guitars that are electrics with a piezo bridge. So they play exactly like an electric. I think the acoustic tones need a bit more EQ love than my standard acoustics, but that's not too big a deal to me.

    Peace,
     
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  11. frquent flyer

    frquent flyer Member

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    I'd give the taylor T 5 a chance. It has an electric feel to it.
     
  12. 8TrackJoe

    8TrackJoe Member

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    If you want a thin body then I would suggest either a hybrid like a Taylor T5, Godin or a Crafter. Straight up acoustic I would say a used American made Ovation Super Shallow Body or maybe a Carvin thinbody Acoustic Electric. Yamaha has thin body the APX and the A1/A3 series are nice. The Taylor guitars have a nice neck, but if you want a smaller guitar then look at the x12 series (312, 412, 512......). I have a 214ce, but would love to move to a 312ce. Also Martin has their HPL black series that I enjoyed playing in the store.
     
  13. Frozen Rat

    Frozen Rat Gold Supporting Member

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    If you want an acoustic guitar that's close to as easy as an electric then you want a 24.75" scale Gibson strung with 11s. They have a narrower nut than most acoustics too (1.72" opposed to 1.75" typical, although some are 1.68"). A J-45, Hummingbird or J-15/35/29 etc. are shorter scale, narrower and can take low action and sound good strung with 11s. I suppose you could go even to 10s. The reason why these guitars are easy to play is the lower tension of the 24.75 scale and that 1.72" nut fits most people's hands very comfortably. My Hummingbird feels only slightly more challenging to me than my LP and it has 12s on it.
     
  14. Matt L

    Matt L Supporting Member

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    Taylor 214ce

    1-11/16" nut, neck profile very similar to a slim '60s Gibson.
     
  15. Lewguitar

    Lewguitar Member

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    Like I said, the lighter the strings the more it'll feel like your electric guitar.

    But eventually, if you're serious about the acoustic, you're going to have to develop the hand strength to play a set with a wound G and higher action than you can get away with on an electric guitar.

    I use Daddario light phosphor bronze.
     
  16. Bear in Hastings

    Bear in Hastings Member

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    I play a Russ Haywood solid body acoustic. Russ is a renowned luthier from Hastings in the UK. It is packed with Russ’ renown flair for the unusual, this is by far the best choice for a player who wants the playability, tone and look of an acoustic with the ease of a solid body. This high end solid body acoustic is made by hand and the quality shows.

    It features a comfortable cutaway electric style body, comprising a veneer top and the striking electric blue on the back and sides, all enhanced with fine quality body binding. The guitar’s main timber is Black Limba, which is actually white. The front is Sequoia Sempervirens, i.e. a burl piece of a giant Redwood tree.

    For such an appealing body, the hard rock mahogany neck, fingerboard, head veneer and ebony bridge set it off perfectly. One of the highlights is the blue Turquoise Matrix which is a kind of stone and the neck with a smooth finish that feels beautiful in the hands and plays like a dream.

    This model is fitted with an EMG, and the pre-amp is made by Dave Barnett, another Hastings genius known for his design of the Barnett Davies amplifier. Dave’s circuitry is special and known only to him as he designed it all himself. This produces great-quality sound, with both the bright top end along with the depth and resonance of the bass. It is so well screened you can hear no noise at all. This is more than just an instrument to play it becomes a part of your expression. I have no idea what Dave Barnett adds to make it sound so good. He probably he colluded with the Devil on some crossroads somewhere.

    This instrument has finally resolved a problem that I have been trying to solve for years. I have found a practical electric that plays like and sounds like a high end acoustic. I play it through an AER so I get the quality of sound expected for such an instrument. If this is what you are looking for I suggest that, once you have saved up, speak to Russ.
     
  17. Bear in Hastings

    Bear in Hastings Member

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  18. shredtrash

    shredtrash Supporting Member

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    Another vote for Taylor guitars.
     
  19. ArtDecade

    ArtDecade Supporting Member

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    Pretty old thread bump, lads.
     
  20. TomV

    TomV Supporting Member

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    Check out the Cort Frank Gambale. I saw Frank demo it at NAMM and he said the neck and setup
    Was based on his Les Paul. It was strung up with 10's and he made it sound beautiful. You can find them for under $700.

    Edit. Ok, old thread. still some good info.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2019

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