Acoustic to Electric Transition and Gear

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by coolikedat99, Feb 4, 2015.

  1. coolikedat99

    coolikedat99 Member

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    I am beginning the transition from acoustic to electric guitar, and am curious about the gear used in electric guitars. I have played several electrics through multiple different amps at music stores, but have had a hard time finding a really GREAT tone in most of the combinations I have tried. By far, my favorite clean amp was an all-tube Vox AC-15, but I would definitely like more overdrive/distortion available from the amp (without having to reach too-loud volumes). I have played several Fender amps, and didn't like the cleans or overdrive too much. I did like a Marshall I played, but the cleans weren't quite the sound I'd like. As far as guitars go, I was happy with how a Tele and a LP sounded in overdriven sounds, but only REALLY liked a Strat for the clean tones (on the Vox). Playing wise, I have always played my acoustics kind of like an electric (lots of bends, vibrato, muting), but I don't want to get rid of a decent strumming and fingerpicking tone (think some of Jeff Buckley's songs).

    Also, I found a Gibson Les Paul on Ebay with a repaired headstock (had been snapped horizontally) with no hardware besides the body and neck. How much work and money would go into getting a guitar like this playing and sounding correctly?
    (P.S. I do know many of the terms that have to do with electric guitars and amps, so feel free to use them).
     
  2. Kurt L

    Kurt L Member

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    My advice is do NOT buy the LP with a headstock repair and no hardware.

    Considering that you are just transitioning to an electric, you may find getting it operable again takes more time and money than you care to give up. Trust me, I've fallen into the project trap more than once. (Of course, if you enjoy projects and occasionally learning the hard way... just ignore everything I wrote.)

    Rather than buying every single piece of hardware to restore a guitar that's in bad shape, you'd be better off applying the money to a good guitar. Remember, that guitar is for sale because someone is giving up on it. Hmm....

    With regard to the amp, sounds like you enjoyed the Vox for its clean tones and there are a million flavors of overdrive, distortion and fuzz pedals to get you wherever you want to go. Go for it!
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2015
  3. coolikedat99

    coolikedat99 Member

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    Alright, thanks for the comment. I can see your point about the LP, and I'll think about it some more before deciding.
    As far as overdrives go, what are some good starting out tips some of you have for getting overdriven sounds from clean amps? Do guitar stores let you try out pedals with their in-store amps and guitars? I've heard a Big Muff in action, and it sounded pretty cool, but how would it go with a single-coil driven Vox?
     
  4. teledude55

    teledude55 Member

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    I usually always recommend a Strat style guitar for a first Electric- they are comfortable, classic and can cover a wide range of sounds/styles. Not to mention there are a billion Strat style guitars in the world and they can be had for pretty cheap. Spend your money on a good amp.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2015
  5. Guitarwiz007

    Guitarwiz007 Silver Supporting Member

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    This. A good amp will make even a crappy guitar sound good. Never works the other way around. Check out the Mesa line. Just about all of them have pristine cleans you'll just have to find your style of distortion/overdrive. I chose the Express over the pricier Lonestar because I liked it better. But if you have the coin, really check out the Mark V. To me that I one of the best sounding amps on the planet period.
     
  6. drbob1

    drbob1 Silver Supporting Member

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    A Vox is a great first amp, pair it with a decent overdrive (a $129 Timmy would be a great investment, or a Soul Food for even less).

    As to the guitar, I'd go to the nearest instrument stores, find a Vox to plug into and grab every used $150 guitar they have that looks decent and find the one that plays best and feels best and sounds best to you. Lots of times that's going to be a used Peavey or Fender but you never know what'll be around. Don't buy a project at this point, you have no idea if you're even going to like it when it's done.
     
  7. Torb

    Torb Member

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    As drbob1 is saying, a Vox is a great first amp. And a Strat, especially one of the more modern ones (Player/Deluxe-series from Fender or similar) would be a safe and versatile choice. I would add some kind of a cheap overdrive pedal to the rig, something to make the amp a bit more driven at low volumes. The Digitech Bad Monkey or something similar comes to mind.

    I would happily do a small blues gig with a Fender Classic Player Strat into a Bad Monkey pedal followed by a Vox AC15C1.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  8. Pietro

    Pietro 2-Voice Guitar Junkie and All-Around Awesome Guy

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    First electric? Imho, you want a tele. More people seem to think you can play any style of music on a tele than any other guitar. It sounds GREAT overdriven (might have to turn the tone down, but that's easy) and clean and is usable in all positions.

    I wouldn't pay a lot, but I wouldn't get junk either. I'd get a used MiM or cheaper American.

    You already know what amp you want. Get the AC15 and for grit, get a drive pedal. NOBODY can tell you which drive pedal, I promise you. Try some.
     

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