ADHD. Please Share Your Insight.

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by MustardCap, Mar 14, 2019.

  1. FuzzBucket

    FuzzBucket Member

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    No one wants a crutch, especially for one's kid, but everything you have to biologically do everyday is essentially a crutch, like eating, drinking, pooping, sleeping.

    I have to take Vit D pills which I wish I didn't have to, but I rather pop a pill then have to spend an hour a day getting it from the sun.

    I also rather jump in my car and go my friends and jam at a moments notice, then have to first take some time to get something to eat to last me, but if don't eat properly first, then I can't jam as long, or as well, and I'll start feeling crappy and that's really no fun.

    I know it's hitting you hard because it's affecting your kid and there's that loss-of-control factor as a loving concerned parent, but be thankful it's not real cruches and it's just a convenient little pill he has to take. He may not need to for the rest of his life and to the point of my initial post, taking those meds under doctor supervision is low-risk.

    As for any therapies to reduce the need for those meds, a lot of good advice has already been given, but I'd put emphasis on what the one guy above mentioned; nutrition. Try to clean up your kid's diet to see if that makes a difference (eat less processed foods) & make sure he's getting adequate exercise. I really think two of our society's biggest causes of health problems are crappy diet & ever-increasing sedentary lifestyle. The biggest cause is stress and that's scientifically proven, btw.

    Enroll him in a wrestling, or mma gym. Young little dudes love to grapple. It's in our guy DNA. :)
     
  2. aldocello

    aldocello Member

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    Sorry, I wasn't paying attention. But seriously folks - My son was diagnosed with ADD years ago. We took him to a doctor who specialized in writing Adderal prescriptions. That's all he did all day long Monday through Friday. He never really attempted to diagnose my son's problem. We made my son take the Adderal because we thought it was the right thing to do. The drug was awful. It turned my vivacious son into a freaking zombie. We took him off the drug. My son continued to have problems through his teen years. But then guess what happened? He grew up. He's a great dad. He's a hardworking young man who works at a trade solving complex problems every day.

    I think Adderal is an awful drug. I hope you can find other solutions for your child.
     
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  3. tonewoody

    tonewoody Member

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    ADHD is a 'spectrum' disorder. Symptoms manifest in various ways and degrees in different individuals.

    There isn't a 'one size fits all' solution. Everyone is wired a little bit differently.
     
  4. Dr. Tweedbucket

    Dr. Tweedbucket Deluxe model available !!!11

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    Here is a pretty detailed video on it, it's terrible at all the drugs they put these kids on, it seems like a guessing game. :dunno

     
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  5. shadow mask

    shadow mask Member

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    It’s strongly associated with the autism spectrum, there is a lot of genetic overlap with it. I agree that ADHD is a spectrum disorder.

    I think that I have ADHD to some degree and a doctor told me that I am on the autistic spectrum as well which I think is correct. I have noticed a lot of correlations with autism like anxiety, intense sensitivity to odours, physical clumsiness, very bad motion sickness, poor social understanding, etc.

    I’ve always had problems maintaining focus on stuff, which makes it hard to do things like sit and watch a film or study. I just want all the info NOW.

    Apparently Ritalin can stunt growth in adolescents, possibly due to sleep disturbance and consequent lower levels of growth hormone. Low GH isn’t good for adults either.
     
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  6. NamaEnsou

    NamaEnsou Supporting Member

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    That is exactly the problem. The majority of drugs people are taking are simply not necessary, although the professions that benefit financially like to push the idea that drugs to help people live normal lives are the way to go.
     
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  7. Exiled_On_Main_St

    Exiled_On_Main_St Member

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    I have it. I have had to learn how to focus and realign my concentration when I lose it. I get distracted a lot but I know when it’s okay to be distracted and when not. My job is very focus orientated and when I have something to focus on I excel as I seem to crave the opportunity. I am an ICU nurse and I’ve never had any issues. But people do notice I can be a motormouth at times.

    I was on Ritalin as a child and I took the sparkle away from life. It made me into a zombie and took the very thing that made me away from me. I believe it also contributed to the issues I have with anxiety and depression. Only when I decided that I would no longer take it did I start to take control.

    If my son has it I will never put him on Ritalin. Never ever.

    I believe with the right methods, finding the thing that the person wants to focus on, enough support, you can train a person and help them excel. I feel like we have a tendency towards the arts and this should be a first port of call for people with ADHD in helping them learn how to focus on tasks. By helping them focus on tasks they enjoy you can use that to aid in concentrating on things that aren’t as enjoyable. And in controlling impulsivity.

    If I can do it anyone can. I really do believe that.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2019 at 7:39 AM
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  8. Custom Deluxe

    Custom Deluxe Member

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    Each case is different and each treatment plan should be different. I'm in education so I see it everyday. What isn't mentioned in this thread are those teens or young adults who begin self-medicating in order to help them cope with the lack of control they often feel.

    It would be very irresponsible to make a blanket statement that all ADHD meds are bad and no one should be on them.

    I think the real issue is finding a doctor willing to look at each case comprehensively and not immediately jump to the conclusion medication is or is not necessary.
     
  9. tycobb73

    tycobb73 Supporting Member

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    Key here is years ago. The dosages were much higher then. Now they start you off on a lesser dose and gradually increase it. I notice no difference in my son's personally.

    My friend is a teacher. She says she can tell who has it and isn't medicated because everytime someone sharpens a pencil these kids look up.
     
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  10. guitarmook

    guitarmook Member

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    I finished HS in 83, college in 89. I don't know when ADD became a formal diagnosis, but I didn't even hear about it until about 98. I've never been formally diagnosed, but have read about ADD quite a bit, and my adaptive behaviors fit everything perfectly. HS was easy, I didn't really have to work, but my grades were 'uneven'... if I could stay focused enough to do the easy work, good grades. If not, problems. But I did well enough and got into a difficult engineering school, and really struggled. But once I changed behaviors, my grades improved dramatically.

    What behaviors? What works for me most is lists. Very detailed lists. Not just 'clean the bathroom', but clean the sink, clean the counter, clean the stool, clean the tub, clean the tile, clean the floor, clean the mirror. Here's why that matters/works for me. When I get interrupted (and I know I will), I can come back to the list. I can cross-off little pieces as I go, which rewards behavior and encourages more. And if, at the end of the day, I've been distracted several times, and haven't finished the bathroom yet, it's not a downer that I couldn't even get THAT done... I can still look and see I've only got 2 or 3 things left.

    Depression and anxiety are very commonly associated w/ ADD - because, in part, you think you're just not making progress, or you're constantly failing to pull it together. And it's a spiral, because the anxiety/depression takes you away from accomplishing the list.

    I've treated my ADD behaviorilly(?), and it works, mostly. I'm fairly successful w/ my job, have taught my wife who I am and what helps and what doesn't help, and I'm doing okay - but it's still something I struggle with, everyday.
     
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  11. Stringmaster

    Stringmaster Gold Supporting Member

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    I'll throw in--I'm a School Psychologist, and my main function is to assess children with (or potentially with) disabilities that may qualify them for special education. I've worked at all levels from preschool through high school. Students with ADHD (or ADHD-like behaviors) can potentially qualify under "Other Health Impaired". I agree with Custom Deluxe's input--it's such a mixed bag and should be looked at on an individual basis. Finding a good doc is essential. One of my pet peeves is that some docs will make a diagnosis based solely on parent input. I honestly think this is borderline unethical, as I feel teacher input is a huge part of the equation--maybe even bigger than parent input due to the amount of time teachers are with the kids, and they have ongoing observation/insight regarding a child's behaviors in a structured and demanding environment. The harder ones to pinpoint are the children with "inattentive type" ADHD as they don't wear it on their sleeves. These kids tend to be compliant, are not behavior problems, but may be completely off task internally--so they often are seen as lazy, or blend in and go undetected. They will often be focused one-on-one, but get lost in the classroom. Then there's the flip side of students with high amounts of hyperactivity and impulsivity. They wear it on their sleeves. These kids are often seen as behavior problems, struggle with academics, and social problems are often a result as they can be hard for peers to tolerate. Quite often these students are very bright, but can't pull it together. I currently have two little guys that fall into this category--they even lack focus 1-1 and need constant redirection in the classroom. Re the medication issue--I have first hand witnessed dramatic changes in students once starting medication, and you can instantly tell if they forgot their meds for a day--teachers will agree with that. I have also seen the struggle of students who could really benefit from meds, but are not on them--that's a parent decision that I don't make--they're not my kid! Another point that I'd add is that the future for students who struggle academically is not always good---when they hit high school (or before) the failing kids tend to hang out with other kids that are failing, and what they are doing is not often the best (ie drugs etc). I honestly think there is more risk for substance abuse in kids that fail, vs those that are on stimulant meds that benefit them--but that's just opinion from my observations. If a parent asks for my advice or "what would you do if it were you're kid" I tell them I would find a good doc that I trust, have good contact/communication with school/teachers, try behavioral strategies that may help to improve organizational skills (there are many books on the subject or therapists that can help), and closely monitor. if I felt that I tried everything but meds with no success, I would explore that (If it were my kid). Pet peeve 2--parents monitoring meds on their own without doctor input: I have parents tell me that they tried meds for a day and their kid went through the roof/was a zombie, etc--and I ask if they reported this to the doc, and often the answer is no. This needs to happen as there is no one size fits all and often (and unfortunately) trial and error is needed to nail it. As a side note, I think there is a lot of merit to the impact of screen time (and research back this)--they are finding that this level of stimulation can cause a lack of being able to do menial tasks or sit in less stimulating environments (such as math class) and maintain focus--so if it were my kid, I would really limit this, as well as increase physical activity. PS: I've not seen cases where alternative methods such as essential oils, homeopathic etc has done any good for students who really benefit from meds. So meds? Maybe--it depends on the child. I could go on but gotta go!!
     
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  12. PBGas

    PBGas Supporting Member

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    If you really want to help a child with ADHD, consider looking into Neurofeedback/Biofeedback. It works incredibly well and has long term lasting effects. Instead of meds, it is the first line treatment in Europe. I used to be a trainer for this as a side occupation to my main one because when it was started in use in the mid-90s for children and adults, I was really interested in learning more about it. I trained myself on the machines as well for about 2 years and it really continued to help my focus and concentration. I no doubt grew up with this. It has helped me accomplish so much that I would have never thought possible in my own life/occupation.

    Everyone looks for the magic pill but in reality, it is a short term solution. Eventually over time, there are side effects that really rear it’s ugly head as the child turns into a teen and what do docs do...increase the meds yet again. I’m not saying it is wrong, I am saying that there are other methods out there that also work.

    I have had my younger son (7) on Neurofeedback for the past year and it is amazing how much better he is not doing in school these days. It took many sessions and it is not cheap but I can honestly say that I have seen the results first hand and they worked beautifully for him. My bass player in my band is a psychologist and he agrees completely as he has looked into it as well. He has his son doing the training now as well. You really have to be consistent with the first 40 sessions. That is the key.

    I am only reporting on what has worked for my son.
     
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  13. Fred Farkus

    Fred Farkus Gold Supporting Member

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    Our son was diagnosed with it in high school. He came to us and told us he was having trouble focusing on his homework and wanted to see the doc. He was prescribed a med, sorry, don't remember what it was. He only took it on school days and it helped him immensely.

    Everyone is different and these have to be handled on a case by case basis. Don't listen to generalizations about "overmedication" and etc. Do what is right for your kid and what you are all comfortable with.
     
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  14. amstrtatnut

    amstrtatnut Member

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    We tried non drug alternatives for years.

    Ultimately, you must find a health professional you trust. We found a phsyciatrist that explained aderoll to us, how it works and what the effects are.

    I cant to you not to worry. Talk to your health pro or find one you trust and talk to them.
     
  15. bluesoul

    bluesoul Silver Supporting Member

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    Big problem: *** ADHD, it seems, has become something of a runaway train. But who is its conductor? “
    Grossly misdiagnosed and grossly mistreated.
    Diagnosed for a “condition” does not equate to having a condition.
    “Can’t “focus does not equate to “won’t focus.

    A real problem: There is a condition/disorder
    ADHD…Difficult to diagnose based on behavior and symptoms and initially distinguish the difference between “can’t” or “won’t” Obviously, something that cannot be ignored!

    There are of alternatives to medication. Medication is effective with some kids (adults too), but should be considered a last resort, one that is much better than struggling through life though! It is at difficult decision for parents! Proceed with caution!

    BTW…it was in the early nineties where things really escalated with “diagnoses” and treatment through use of drugs. Pharmaceutical companies were sending sales reps through the doors of the schools educating teachers about ADD/ADHA and leaving pamphlets for teachers to hand out to parents. Teachers were essentially making a first diagnose and then sending kids to specific doctors that would prescribe meds. At the time Ritalin was the common drug we began to hear about. Sounds like the wolf shepherding the sheep! (fortunately, that all came to an end!)
    I remember seeing the pamphlet from Ciba-Geigy during a visit to the school where I learned from a teacher that my 1st grader was ADHA. The teacher recommended a specific doctor to go to…I chose to go elsewhere (specialist in child development). Ends up that my son was simply bored and behaving in a way that raised suspicion in regards to ADHA. I learned a lot through the process and it was very alarming what was going on.

    ***A quote from the book “How ADHD Was Sold. (by Adam Gaffney)
    ADHD, it seems, has become something of a runaway train. But who is its conductor? “
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2019 at 12:18 PM
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  16. The Funk

    The Funk Member

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    I have. I've always had it. Definitely real.

    Was not medicated for most of my life. Had cylert as a ten year old (which has since been removed from the market). Went off it at after a year.

    Wasn't medicated again until senior year in college. Ritalin. Terrible. Made me withdrawn and anti social. Took me years to recover. Stopped that after the first semester.

    Didn't take any other medication until I got married at 34, at the insistence of my wife. She and I thought I was depressed. The reality was that I felt out of control and was anxious about the responsibilities of being married. The doctor prescribed Adderall XR. It was a life changer, and a life saver.

    ADHD in general had a huge effect on my self esteem, sense of self worth, and identity. Fortunately I'm pretty smart, and really tenacious, so while I was often told I'd probably never make it through high school, I managed to go to graduate from an Ivy League college, and eventually i got a masters degree. I had a fairly successful career as a freelance UX designer (before that was a thing), but my career was sort of peaking out due to the limitations of my ability to focus. When I started on Adderall XR, those issues went away, and I was able to advance in my career.

    ADHD is basically feels like you are trying to go through life and be nice to everyone, but everyone is getting mad at you all the time and you don't know why.

    Its is unbelievably difficult to deal with on your own. Its an issue with a part of your brain that controls impulses that is underdeveloped. The stimulants work on that part of the brain to bring its performance to normal. You don't get high on adderall XR if you have ADHD. You just get normal.

    Of course, everyone's brain is different and a different medication may work better for some. Strenuous exercise helps a lot, but with a life full of work, wife, band, and kids, its not always as possible as you'd like.
     
  17. bluesoul

    bluesoul Silver Supporting Member

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    That would be part of the problem. She is a teacher and not a medical professional! Carry on!
     
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  18. amstrtatnut

    amstrtatnut Member

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    The "crutch" thinking is understandable but not correct.

    If your child needed glasses, would you call them a crutch? The way it was explained is that our brains work differently. The meds help people whos brains have trouble processing certain things to be able handle them better. Not a crutch but glasses.

    I dont want to go too far down the path here. Try alternatives if you want to.

    PM me. Ill give you more info on what we tried.
     
  19. The Funk

    The Funk Member

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    This is a medical issue and discipline has nothing to do with it. I'm disciplined as hell. What would've happened to me in the 50's is that I would've been kicked out of school, and likely not been able to be a successful, productive member of society. That's not a better outcome.
     
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  20. Penguinchit

    Penguinchit Member

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    My son tried neurofeedback and it made quite a difference.

    https://www.additudemag.com/neurofeedback-adhd-brain-training/

    His old doc gave him med after med after med and my son hated it. It changed who he was, affected his sleep and I think it led him on the depression path. We're pretty much meds as a last resort now. Diet has been a huge benefit for him. We've cut out most non-natural foods from our diets. Also, I hope you can take a different path than us and do more early on to understand what your son could be thinking and feeling as he struggles. I wish so much that I would have had a better understanding when my son was younger. I always knew my son was smart and though he just wanted to be lazy and goof off. ADD took it's toll and I helped catalyst the process because I thought he was following my footsteps and not working to his potential. We knocked down what could have been a vibrant young man and there's not a day that goes by that I regret the parent I was.

    Check out the ADDitude site. There are lots of informational articles that have helped me learn.

    https://www.additudemag.com/category/parenting-adhd-kids/

    To be honest, my wife is the one who understands and empathizes much better than me, so if you have more questions and stuff, PM me and I'll run it by her.

    This is completely true. Every kid who has to deal with ADD should be given this opportunity.
     
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