Adjusting action of guitar

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by Ides of March, Oct 16, 2008.

  1. Ides of March

    Ides of March Member

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    My action is kind of high especially at the 10 and 12th fret is too high actually. What is the best way to adjust the action on my Taylor, I know it's not the tension rod. Do I have to file down the saddle piece?
     
  2. jpfeiff

    jpfeiff Member

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    Get a professional setup from a qualified guitar tech for the best results. Yes, they might indeed adjust the truss rod, before resorting to sanding down the saddle.
     
  3. JSeth

    JSeth Member

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    don't mess with it if you don't know what you're doing... take it to a shop that sells Taylors (an authorized dealer if possible) and ask them what to do...

    If you don't have that option, let a qualified luthier/repair person do it. Although I have been playing guitar for 50 years (good God! ) and can do some stuff myself, I have found that a solid relationship with a great gutar tech is INVALUABLE! Find someone you can trust, and learn from them when they do your instrument set-ups and repairs...
    Every one of the men who have worked on or built my guitars are trusted friends and I wouldn't have it any other way!!!
     
  4. geetarman

    geetarman Member

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  5. David Collins

    David Collins Member

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    Only difference here is I would reverse that. The fact that a store sells guitars, should in NO way be taken as an endorsement they know anything at all about working on guitars. Quite the opposite is usually true, and "music store setups" often tend to be near the bottom of the barrel in my experience.

    If you don't have a tech to go to, check around with your friends in the area. Sometimes music stores will have a decent tech, but don't take it as a given.
     
  6. Structo

    Structo Member

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    How old is the guitar?
    Is it still under warranty?

    Is there a visible hump in the top behind the bridge?

    First thing I would try is to loosen the strings and give the truss rod nut about 1/8 turn clockwise.
    Then re-tune and let it settle for a few days.
    If that helped any, you may need to go a little tighter but remember a 1/4 turn is huge on most guitars so don't get too aggressive with it.
     
  7. Ides of March

    Ides of March Member

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    the guitar is from 2001 and from what I have read I believe that the saddle piece needs to be sanded some. but it's only at the 10 to 12th fret where I have noticed it being a little higher that the top and middle of the fretboard.
     
  8. chris77

    chris77 Member

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    Hey bro I to play Taylors and know just what you are dealing with. I bought a 441ce l3 a few years ago and right away needed a good set up. I have learned to set up my own gear but that is just me. Everything that has already been stated is true it could be your truss rod, first of all. If you taylor was bought new you should have some instructions in the case on how to determine if you neck is straight. (if not just do some quick google research.) if it is indeed a bowed neck then a quick turn of the truss should bring things down. But IMO you should not use the truss to adjust the string height. I switched my stock saddle out for a fishman cleartone and had to sand mine to get it where I liked it. I just used some med grit sandpaper taped to a wood block, then held another woodblock (about half the length of the bottom piece leaving the sandpaper exposed) on top of that block creating a 90 degree angle then simply held the saddle against the block while draging it back and forth on the sand paper. This will help you from sanding an angle into the saddle. Now how far you go is the important part, I use a micrometor to check my progress and just took it slow. I would sand a little be more between string changes untill I got it right. Even if you totaly screw it up it is not to big of a deal just buy a new one and start over. (although you will propbaly have to sand the width as well as the height on a new saddle) I to agree just because they sell the things dont mean they know squat about them.

    Shawn
     

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