Advice for learning and understanding rhythm, and how it works.

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Jaradc, Sep 8, 2008.

  1. Jaradc

    Jaradc Member

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    I've bounced around from teacher to teacher the past few years learning "the basics". All of the teachers insisted that i start over again, which i willingly abided. But after a few weeks, or in some cases months, of the basics of scales i grew bored and stopped to learn by myself, and to save money because i felt like i wasnt learning anything new.

    When i write a song, I initially create (sometimes on a random occasion) a cool sounding riff. Half the time im stuck with this riff, because i cant find anything in my rarely creative mind to match up with this melody in my head.

    So my question is...


    Is there any books/videos/etc that i could buy that would help myself better understand the art of basic theory of music, and how chord (a) matches with chord (b), and so on. Sorry if i am doing a bad job of explaining what i want.


    To better refine my guitar teachers, they were all great teachers but i felt like i was being focused more around lead playing rather than rhythm. I also feel like i learn better by myself with books.

    Thanks guys, any help would be great!
     
  2. Kendrick68

    Kendrick68 Member

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    Hi Jaradc,

    After reading your post I think what you are asking is not about rhythm but rather harmony. To sum it up briefly, rhythm is about subdividing the beat. Harmony is about finding consonant or dissonant sounds to augment your melody. Please provide some feedback as to exactly which entity you are inquiring. This will enable other musicians to give you proper advice.
     
  3. The Captain

    The Captain Supporting Member

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    Yeah, I was a bit confused about what you meant too. I agree that a lot of teachers start this "learn some scales and then improv with them" schtick which goes nowhere. I've been there , done that with a bunch of teachers too.
    Learn some songs, and you will be letting the great composers teach you.
    Knowing scales is not bad. getting disillusioned with playing because that's all you are getting is bad. Lessons should contain music as well as theory and exercises.
     
  4. Jaradc

    Jaradc Member

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    Kendrick and Violet,

    Thanks for the response, Kendrick you are correct about my miss interpretation. Basically what i would like to figure out, if i'm playing a song and the chorus is a G chord, what would sound good with a G chord to make a breakdown/verse/and so on.

    Thanks,
    Jarad
     
  5. UnderTheGroove

    UnderTheGroove Supporting Member

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  6. willhutch

    willhutch Supporting Member

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    How many songs do you know how to play? After you get enough songs under your belt, you get familiar with the sound conveyed by certain chord changes. Eventually, it becomes apparent that a handful of chord changes occur again and again and again. As you recognize this, you begin to learn what makes music tick from a harmonic standpoint. This can then guide you in creating new songs.

    Listening and learning tunes is critical. A teacher cannot simply give you this experience. What a teacher can do is teach you some theory that can help you make sense of what is going on in your favorite music. A little basic theory can help you, for instance, know what chords lie in a particular key. Also, how chords are constructed is very helpful. This is very useful info for making music.

    It sounds like the problems you are having with your teachers is that they are not teaching what you want to learn. A decent teacher can give you some knowledge that will help in understanding chord progressions. Next time you interview a prospective teacher, here are some topics to inquire about:
    harmonizing the major scale
    chord construction
    chord progressions

    Actually, you can do a websearch on any of these topics and get info to help understand "if i'm playing a song and the chorus is a G chord, what would sound good with a G chord to make a breakdown/verse/and so on"
     
  7. Jaradc

    Jaradc Member

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    Great! Thanks for the info guys! Much help.
     

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