After de-glossing the finish with a course Scotch-Brite, then what?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by gulliver, Jan 30, 2012.

  1. gulliver

    gulliver Member

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    De-glossing a black (thick) poly ‘80s strat, no added relicing, just want a matte finish.

    The finer scotch-brite type pad didn’t do much, so I used the next course one. Circuler motion looked strange, so I hand buffed it with the grain. Now, the finish is basically straight scratches that take on every finger print.

    What next? Going back to the finer scotch-brite smooths it a bit, but it still doesn’t look finished. I’m just looking for a nice matte.

    THANKS
     
  2. whaiyun

    whaiyun Member

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    use a bit pure carunaba (sp?) wax and rub on and rub off.. it might be a bit shiny but it'll be less odd looking...
     
  3. fumbler

    fumbler Member

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    Micromesh or polishing papers like this are what you need. Just stop at the finest grade that gives you what you are looking for.
     
  4. musicofanatic5

    musicofanatic5 Supporting Member

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    Just exactly the sort of process that should not be performed by unauthorized personnel, if one wants good results. Fellas here talk about "sanding" their neck or sanding to remove finish, and I cringe. Abrasives should be sold to properly licensed individuals only.


    ...unless, of course, you don't care how it turns out.
     
  5. nrandall85

    nrandall85 Member

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    Micromesh is the right tool for the job. As long as there's finish left, you can even get it back to factory appearance if you want.

    Clean with naptha in between each grit. Stay away from scotch brite and sandpapers.
     
  6. gulliver

    gulliver Member

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    So, I should pay someone to work on all my projects and never learn anything. :huh
     
  7. rockonomics

    rockonomics Member

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    :agree Some people just don't understand that they at one time couldn't even **** without a diaper. Life is a learning process. Ignore the cork shiffin' butt wads.
     
  8. FrankiePRS

    FrankiePRS Member

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    This.
     
  9. dnauhei

    dnauhei Member

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    Excellent results can be achieved relatively easily with wet sanding. Get some wet dry sand paper and some paint thinner and go to town! You can always experiment with some polyurethane from home depot with this technique. Paint some wood with some poly and then try out the wet sanding. You'll be blown away at what a nice even finish you will be able to achieve with relative ease.
     
  10. gulliver

    gulliver Member

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    What grit do you usually recommend.

    The poly is so thick, I don't think I need to worry about going through.
     
  11. Trebor Renkluaf

    Trebor Renkluaf I was hit by a parked car, what's your excuse? Gold Supporting Member

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    You don't pay someone to change your strings, do you?

    De-glossing the back of the neck aint rocket science and can do wonders to relieve that sticky feeling many gloss necks have.
     
  12. gulliver

    gulliver Member

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    Thanks for your suggestions.

    Home Depot had sand paper labeled deglossing and they're 600 grit. Marketing is everything, so I bought a 3-pack and will start there. The micromesh pack looks good, but costs almost 10% what I paid for the guitar :p
     
  13. Smakutus

    Smakutus Member

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    Some of you guys make this wayy harder than it is.. Steel wool and about five minutes time and you get a matte finish. After playing it a while the oils from your skin will shine it back up. Repeat with the steel wool etc etc..

    Jeff
     
  14. gulliver

    gulliver Member

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    You're probably right, my other strat was purchased with a degloss and that's what the seller said he did.

    How coarse? 00 or 000?
     
  15. pinefd

    pinefd Member

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    If you're going to go the steel wool route, I wouldn't go an courser than 0000. Oh, and make sure you tape up your pickups beforehand, or you'll get all the errant pieces of steel from the wool sticking to (and in) them.
     
  16. TStrat99

    TStrat99 Member

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    0000 Steel wool has always worked fine for me too. Cheap and easy. I run it across the necks of all my guitars with glossy necks. No need to take it to anyone. That's just plain silly. It's easier than changing strings! Eventually it'll gloss back up again though.
     
  17. Curt

    Curt Member

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    Where do I apply for an "abrasive license"?
     
  18. old goat

    old goat Member

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    skip the steel wool and use wet to dry sandpaper (I would use water with a touch of dish soap instead of mineral spirits)--each grit should be used until the scratches from the previous grit before moving to the next. Once you get up to 600 grit you can go to the white and then gray scotchbrite, or to finer sandpaper grits from an autoparts store. Stop at whatever grit you're happy with.
     
  19. Wake911

    Wake911 Member

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    Good thing all the guitar companies didn't take your advice and not try their hand at working on guitars and building them......cause they too were once unauthorized personnel and I think some of them(subuild some damn good instruments. And EVH wouldn't have one of the most well known guitars if he'd not taken a stab at reprinting his guitar. Makes me laugh.
     
  20. nl128

    nl128 Silver Supporting Member

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    [​IMG]

    heres one I did before I got my abrasive license. I just took it apart and wet sanded it in my kitchen sink with some maroon colored scotch bright. It was about 10yrs ago and my first attempted. now its my favorite beater

    taking guitars apart having fun ,learning and making mistakes is part of being a guitar player. good luck with your project
     

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