All Blues "Miles Davis" soloing !!

Phreekfuse

Member
Messages
239
So i am really into this Tune called "All Blues by Miles Davis.

Been trying to find a backing track and found a horrible but do-able midi file in the key of G !!

The changes are
G7 X 4 bars
C7 X 2 bars
G7 X 2 bars
D7(#9) X 1 bar
Eb7(#9) X 1/2 bar
D7 (#9) X 1/2 bar
G7 X 2 bars


Can you guys give me tips to what scales and modes i can use over them ^ ??

I can play over this song by ear very easily... but it'd be really cool for me to know what are all my options. Please do help cause i am really a beginner guitarist :)
Thank You for your time ^_^ !!
 

Phreekfuse

Member
Messages
239
That book has all the chord progressions in it :O !! and i can't read that much music >_<" !! but it's miles solos transcribed which i can basically play by ear !!

Really just want to know all the scales and modes and arpeggios i can play over each chord so that i can apply it to other music as well :) !!


Thank you !!
 

D.Cooper

Member
Messages
716
The G mixolidian can be played over most of it, that seems to be the theme. But remember to focus more on the individual changes rather then just playing the same scale up and down over everything ;)
 

harry65

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,284
g mixolydian , g dorian , g major penta , g minor penta , half whole diminished scale starting on D over the turnaround , you basically wanna use mixo and major penta over the g7 chords , g dorian and g minor penta over the c7 chords , this is a good base to start with , from there arpeggios, chromatics and upper tensions come into play but this is a very good base to start from , will take you far...............;)
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
21,841
That book has all the chord progressions in it :O !! and i can't read that much music >_<" !! but it's miles solos transcribed which i can basically play by ear !!

Really just want to know all the scales and modes and arpeggios i can play over each chord so that i can apply it to other music as well :) !!


Thank you !!
G7 GBDFAC(orC#)E arpeggio
GABC(orC#)DEF scale

C7 CEGBbDF(orF#)A arpgeggio
CDEF(orF#)GABb scale

D7 DF#ACEG(orG#)B arpeggio
DEF#G(orG#)ABD scale

Eb7 same as D7 but up a 1/2 step

Try to copy lines from the solos on the record, oops, I mean CD, I mean mp3!
 

Sandy Cheeks

Senior Member
Messages
2,740
With #9 chords, you can use the altered scale, among others:

D7#9: D alt: D Eb F Gb Ab Bb C D
Eb7#9: D# alt: D# E F# G A B C# D#

You can think of that Eb chord as an A7(#11), if you like.
 

Phreekfuse

Member
Messages
239
Thanks alot for all the responses guys :) !!
you'll are terrific :) !!

Any more ideas on the #9 chord changes would be cool :O !!

Peace out ^_^ !!
 

OOG

Member
Messages
3,294
the tune DOES NOT go to a IV chord at bars 5 & 6
it goes to a minor I chord
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
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21,841
the tune DOES NOT go to a IV chord at bars 5 & 6
it goes to a minor I chord
I likes when bass players stay on the G pattern for bars 5&6, like the recording. Nonetheless, I personally think of those bars as C7 with the bass pedaling the G pattern. It pretty much 6 of one, half a dozen of another as far as what to call it. I call it a 12-bar blues.
 

russ6100

Gold Supporting Member
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4,550
I likes when bass players stay on the G pattern for bars 5&6, like the recording. Nonetheless, I personally think of those bars as C7 with the bass pedaling the G pattern. It pretty much 6 of one, half a dozen of another as far as what to call it. I call it a 12-bar blues.
Right you are! Nice to see you've got this concept early in your study of the tune - too many get hung up on over-analyzing it.

If C7 *were* the IV7 chord (like a more traditional blues), a lot of players might play something that could after the fact be analyzed as "C Lydian Dominant", otherwise know as - you guessed it - G melodic minor. So there's were you might regard your "minor" as coming from.

Either way, it's just a 12 bar blues.

Another thing - the D7 to Eb7 to D7 - you can simplify your thinking over these as just "V7" and adjust the amount of tensions to taste. There's nothing wrong with not addressing that Eb7 - it's perfectly OK to let the harmony move underneath of *you*, while you continue with your idea, and play *through* it. So maybe alternate between addressing the Eb7 and not every other chorus.
 
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OOG

Member
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3,294
definitely blues
with a modal twist
as stated the bass stays in G
hence G Dorian on bars 5 & 6
which is essentially the same as C Mixolydian

so basically B or Major 3rd with a flatted 7 for the G Dom section (Mixolydian)
and Bb or minor 3rd (Dorian) for the G min section is the difference since the bass stays in G

this is so subtle the it goes right by most people
 

Sammo

Member
Messages
711
definitely blues
with a modal twist
as stated the bass stays in G
hence G Dorian on bars 5 & 6
which is essentially the same as C Mixolydian
Yeah, it is same note collection, sure. But the soloists on Kind Of Blue version sure try their best to avoid emphasing "e" note during bars 5 & 6 on their solos, but they all sure seem to play Gm7 and it's extensions a lot. And there are virtually no blue notes on G mixolydian parts. This leads me to believe there was instructions to not treat it as blues but as modal tune.
 

gill

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726
Yoiu might want to listen to Larry Carlton's version (on the Last Nite CD) for some ideas also
 

russ6100

Gold Supporting Member
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4,550
Yeah, it is same note collection, sure. But the soloists on Kind Of Blue version sure try their best to avoid emphasing "e" note during bars 5 & 6 on their solos, but they all sure seem to play Gm7 and it's extensions a lot. And there are virtually no blue notes on G mixolydian parts. This leads me to believe there was instructions to not treat it as blues but as modal tune.
I noticed this too.

This is the evidence that proves the sidemen were told to pretty much stick with the modal note pools. Had there been no instruction, those guys would have blown blues and bebop all over this tune. And I think that as great as these guys made it sound, students should be made aware that that was, at that time, a pioneering endeavor, and that there's no reason not to include idiomatic blues vocabulary on the tune when tackling it today.
 
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OOG

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3,294
the trick is avoiding the flat 3rd on the I chord when playing blues over it
save it for the minor I in bars 5 & 6
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
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21,841
the trick is avoiding the flat 3rd on the I chord when playing blues over it
save it for the minor I in bars 5 & 6
If you are playing jazz you can use all twelve notes. I'd think of Bb more as a #9 (ouch A#). That is a fine tension to use. If you play All Blues on the bandstand anything is fair game.
If you are trying to recreate Kind of Blue, that's a different story.
 




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