All-in-One Mics?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by Baphometblood06, Sep 8, 2019.

  1. theRagman

    theRagman Gold Supporting Member

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    This is a great post. Thanks!
     
  2. Ejay

    Ejay Member

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    Recording a good guitarsound isnt all that easy, mic, mic placement, room, amp, preamp, etcetc.
    Offcourse its possible..but odds are that you will get better results with a modeler or IR loading load device connected to your amp.

    Modeling on a budget...check sgear software, that sounds really good, free trial, 125,- to buy if im correct.
    Although there are hitrcords using sm57 on vocals...your kinda stuck to that perticular sound...go condenser if you can...I have good experiences with rode.
     
  3. pold

    pold Member

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    SM57 and a Rode NT-1A. They are not expensive, so I would buy four of them and experiment with all sort of combinations.
     
  4. Humble Texan Fan

    Humble Texan Fan Member

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    The 441 is something of an odd ball mic as it is designed to emulate the response of a condenser with more extended highs.

    Not geared towards anything in particular it's a mic I wouldn't use for electric guitar and similar where a neutral or extended response isn't advisable.
     
  5. Jess 1971

    Jess 1971 Supporting Member

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    An SM57 is the right place to start. You can use it on guitar cabs and even bass cabs and get good results. It's not an ideal vocal mic, as it is unidirectional, but it's still a usable mic for this purpose. You can definitely spend more, and recording gear is, as some have already suggested, an enormous rabbit hole. However, an SM57 is an ideal mic to get started with, as it's pretty ubiquitous and it can serve many purposes.

    Good luck getting started on recording, and please come back and share your results once you've done something you're willing to share!
     
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  6. Baphometblood06

    Baphometblood06 Member

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    Thanks for all the help, everyone.
    I’m currently considering the Rode NT1-A, the SM57, and the SM7B. I’ll let you all know about my final decision, and I’ll definitely get back to you about the results.
    :)
    Peace and love
     
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  7. orogeny

    orogeny Supporting Member

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    i'm going to encourage you to dig into the heil pr35 a little more
    it's effectively designed from a guitar cab mic (the pr30)
    stevie wonder, jacob dylan, and many others use it on vocals
    and, yes, it sounds great on a guitar cab. . . .oh, AND on an acoustic guitar, and as an overhead for drums.
    it doesn't need a preamp.
    it's REALLY fun for singers who use proximity-to-microphone effectively (both live and in the studio)
    it's very feedback-resistant in a live situation.
    it WILL embarrass the sm57 in most situations.
    you won't use the rode live (most likely)
     
  8. Mario C.

    Mario C. Member

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    Beyerdynamic M88 if you want a dynamic that will record guitar, bass amps and vocals.
    Or Beyerdynamic M201 for guitar and bass amps, sounds great on both, sounds good on vocals too.
    Lewitt MTP 440 DM for guitar amps and drums, sounds so much better than a 57 in every way.
    Røde NT1 (the black one, not the NT1A) for all three applications if you want to use a condenser mic.

    Personally I hate the SM57 but that's just me.
     
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  9. drbob1

    drbob1 Silver Supporting Member

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    Learning how to mic a cabinet and a vocal is much more important than the specific mics you're using. You also need to decide if this is going to be a "one and done" purchase, or if it's a temporary measure while you practice and save money for the "right" mic.

    SM57-it's a standard for a reason. It's not transparent, but it makes guitar cabinets sound like they're supposed to, so you really don't need anything else for guitar in the long term. The top end is a little weak for vocals to sound "like you're in the room", but you're not singing ballads, I don't think you're going to hate what you get with the 57 for vocals. And it'll work for bass and drums, although there are better choices. My recommendation? Pick up a used 57 for $50 and stay there for a year.

    SM7B/MD421/RE20-these are the "go to" large diaphragm, dynamic vocal mics, and they can sound really good. Plus they kill on guitar cabs (the 421 is my go to). The downside is that they're $300 used, 6X what you're paying for the 57 for an incremental improvement.

    LDC-the Rode NT1a is certainly a good choice here. I'd also add the Oktava Mk219/319 (different form factors but otherwise the same mic) for $100-150 used. I'd used a 219 for vocals, piano, acoustic guitar, room mics-they sound great. And with a little spare cash, you can mod them from simple (new coupling cap) to complex (new capsule, new caps etc). The Rode is similarly easy to mod with lots of instructions on the web. How about all the other cheap LDCs from MXL, Ocean, Blue and so on? I wouldn't-you're either sacrificing basic sound for a modding project (MXL) or you're paying more for something you can't or won't mod (Blue). I have to say that for your application, the ultimate answer IS the U87, so start saving your pennies ($2000-3500).

    Ribbon mics-these give you a very smooth and accurate picture of either vocals or guitar, many multi-mic setups include a ribbon and a dynamic or LDC. You can find some fairly cheap ones that sound good, but you have to try it out. Plus you need a stout preamp (like the SM7) to get enough volume to work with these, so, I'd say, probably don't go this way at first.

    Be aware that having a decent preamp, decent cables, decent room sound or isolation, and above all, good performance are more critical than the mic.
     
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  10. makerdp

    makerdp Member

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    SM57 of course but for even more flexibility and if you can afford it, RE20 or MD421.
     
  11. Pewtershmit

    Pewtershmit Member

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    Please if you are going to go by the suggestions of an SM57, consider the sennheiser E609 or E906. IMO you'll get better mileage out of them as they don't have the mids that an SM57 is known for. They have a flatter response and a better high end response. Springing for the 906 is a worthwile bump. I love mine. Sold off all my 57s

    They are also better made, and can be draped over a guitar cab.

    You also look cooler singing into one.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. theRagman

    theRagman Gold Supporting Member

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    The Beyerdynamic M88 is a fantastic mic. Great suggestion!

    I also loathe SM57s, so you’re not *completely* alone.
     
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  13. Buck Woodson

    Buck Woodson Supporting Member

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    What's a good room mic for recording multiple amps simultaneously? I would guess you'd want omnidirectional.
     
  14. Baphometblood06

    Baphometblood06 Member

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    Thank you so so much for this recommendation. After checking out both mics and watching multiple comparisons of the SM57 with the E906, I have decided the E906 is absolutely the right mic for me. The clear high end and flat mids are much more suited to the sound I prefer, and it sounds fantastic on vocals too. Since I’ll be recording bass direct into my audio interface, that won’t be an issue.
    And boy oh boy, the E906 absolutely dominates with guitars and vocals. I’m blown away by how much more open and gritty it sounds, especially for metal.
     
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  15. Humble Texan Fan

    Humble Texan Fan Member

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    Yes, the e906 is just lovely. Not tried it on much vocal stuff but the predecessor, the MD409, certainly was an smashing performer here.
     
  16. bigtone23

    bigtone23 Member

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    This. Or a RE20 or Peavey 520i. Larger diaphragm dynamics are a good choice for going around and mic'ing the band.
    57s do a good job all around, too, with the usual limitations for EQing, pop filtering.
     
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  17. Baphometblood06

    Baphometblood06 Member

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    Alright, after much contemplation I have come to my final conclusion:
    Why have one when you can have two?
    So I’ll be purchasing both the SM57 and the Sennheiser E906
    I will let you guys know how my first recordings go, and I might post some results if I feel so inclined. Thank you all for the help
    Peace and love
     
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  18. TonePilot

    TonePilot Supporting Member

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    i'd recommend the SM58. It's a killer VM and a decent amp mic.
     
  19. mc5nrg

    mc5nrg Member

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    Get an SM58 if you want to also use it for vocals. A 57 and 58 are essentially the same mike except for head.
     
  20. eigentone

    eigentone Supporting Member

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    EV RE20 or Shure SM7B are at the top of my list for starting out home recording those three in the genre. If it's in your budget. I'll add that nice pres can really help these mics shine. The mics often need a lot of gain. Cheap pres will often add a lot of noise.

    I'm not a fan of SM57s. They are rugged and cheap, but really not good for bass IMO. You'll be wondering where your fundamental has gone.

    Compare the frequency responses of the SM57:
    https://pubs.shure.com/guide/SM57/en-US

    And the SM7B:
    https://pubs.shure.com/guide/SM7B/en-US

    SM57 starts rolling off around 200 Hz and is around -12 dB at the bass's low E fundamental. The SM7B starts rolling off around 110 Hz and is about -6 dB at that low E.

    RE20's low end performance is even better:
    https://www.electrovoice.com/binary/RE20_Engineering_Data_Sheet.PDF

    The SM57 can be handy for removing low end from guitars, but the RE20 and SM7B have roll of switches so they can perform similarly when you choose.

    I've used all three quite a bit (basically lived in a studio for a few years.) The EV RE20 is the one I think is the most versatile and liked the most.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2019 at 2:52 PM
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